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Ojibwe Culture Celebrated at Ponemah Round House
Tuesday, August 04 2015
 
Written by Michael Meuers, Red Lake News,
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ojibwe culture celebrated at ponemah round house 1.jpgFor the third year in a row, the Red Lake Band hosted an Ojibwe Language and Cul­ture Camp for youth from July 21-23 in Ponemah, Minn.

The three-day Gabeshiwin (camp), hosted by Red Lake Chemical Health and Red Lake Eco­nomic Development and Planning, featured eat­ing traditional foods, lacrosse, moccasin game, plant gathering practices and identification, birch bark crafts, traditional Anishinaabe teachings and more. Gabeshiwin is a part of Red Lake Na­tion’s Ojibwemowin Revitalization efforts.

As elders pass away, the people of the Red Lake Nation are concerned that language and tradi­tion will disappear. To combat those fears, Red Lake officials are focused on language revitaliza­tion and related efforts to retain tribal culture. Much of indigenous culture depends on Native language, as many concepts cannot be translated to English.

The camp was held at the Round House in Ponemah, near the Point, home to more than half of the remaining fluent Ojibwemowin speakers in the United States.

At camp, children participated in Ojibwe sports and crafts, ate traditional foods and learned about traditional spiritual ceremonies and plant-gather­ing practices at Obaashiing, a village known for practicing traditional ways.

By far this was the most well-attended camp yet with 74 youth and 56 elders, staff and parents at­tending the first day. In 2013 only 30 children, 10 to 14 years-old, attended but that attendance nearly doubled in 2014. Each day started off with a hearty breakfast of traditional foods, which was served throughout the camp as part of the cur­riculum.

Tom Barrett, Sr., Director of Red Lake Chemi­cal Health Programs, and a major sponsor of Gabeshiwin (the camp) provided some background. “Our language was basically stripped from us a generation or two ago. The children were forbidden to talk their na­tive language.”

Barrett recalled how U.S. government authorities swept onto reservations and took Ojibwe children to boarding schools to assimilate to the white culture. The rip­ple effects of that action are still being felt by American Indians today.

“We feel if we can raise kids’ self esteem their chance of using chemicals will be less,’’ said elder and first speaker Murphy Thomas. “Self esteem is all tied up with knowing who you are and having a sense of pride in your heritage, language and cul­ture.”

Minnesota’s tribes face threat from currency markets
Tuesday, August 04 2015
 
Written by Lee Egerstrom,
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On the beautiful North Shore, citizens of the Grand Portage Band of Lake Superior Ojibwe often keep one eye looking out over the horizon of Lake Superior and another eye on traffic coming down the shore from Canada.

The U.S. dollar is rising against most of the world’s hard currencies and widening the exchange rate gap with the Canadian dollar as well. From past experience, any imbalance in the exchange rate of currencies can distort trade volume and direction of trade flow; it can certainly influence where people go for tourism and shopping.

Eight out of 10 cars, vans and coaches parked outside the Grand Portage Lodge and Casino most days have Canadian license plates. Other hospitality industry enterprises operated by Northern Minnesota, North Dakota, Montana and other border state tribes and bands are nearly as dependent on international trade as Grand Portage.

But Grand Portage may top them all, said former Minnesota Trade Office director P. Richard Bohr, recently retired from the College of St. Benedict and St. Johns University. He continues to monitor global markets while teaching in the master’s of international business (MIB) and the master’s of international development (MID) programs for St. Mary’s University graduate school in Minneapolis.

“It’s hard to image there is another Minnesota enterprise as dependent on international trade as them,” he said.

The State of Minnesota’s Indian Affairs Council notes that 80 percent of Grand Portage’s hospitality industry revenues come from Canadian visitors. The reservation at the tip of the Arrowhead Region is Cook County’s largest employer, with about 300 people holding jobs in its hospitality industry enterprises. Of them, the Council estimates 18 percent are international employees – First Nation Ojibwe from Thunder Bay – who cross the border each day from their homes in Ontario.

Dayton: Mille Lacs walleye woes require special session
Tuesday, August 04 2015
 
Written by Tim Pugmire, MPR News,
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DFL Gov. Mark Dayton is proposing a special legislative session in August to consider an emergency financial aid package for resorts and other businesses in the Lake Mille Lacs area. But House Speaker Kurt Daudt, R-Crown, says he thinks it may be too early to talk about bringing back the Legislature.

Dayton is concerned about the economic hit that the popular fishing destination will suffer if state officials close the walleye season early due to a dwindling fish population. He discussed the idea with Daudt and Senate Majority Leader Tom Bakk, DFL-Cook, on July 28, and they agreed to the following week to begin planning.

No decisions have been made, but Dayton told reporters on July 29 that the state assistance could include zero interest loans, property tax abatements and additional tourism promotion. He said “time is of the essence” to address a potentially “catastrophic” situation.

“We need to get the loan program under way,” Dayton said. “The resorts up there need working capital so they can pay their employees and just keep open, especially if the walleye fishing has to be closed beginning next week.”

Before a special session area legislators, lawmakers who oversee natural resource issues and state commissioners should meet to talk about the problem and ways to respond, Daudt told MPR News.

“We’re very concerned about the situation. We want to make sure we do what’s right by these resorts. We don’t want to see them suffering because of this closing of the season early,” Daudt said. “But we also want to make sure we’re doing the right thing. And we want to look at all options.”

Dayton met on July 29 in St. Paul with Mille Lacs area officials and business owners. He plans to visit the area later in the week.


Appeals court upholds DNR decision to deny permit to bear researcher
Tuesday, August 04 2015
 
Written by Dan Kraker, MPR News,
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A three-judge panel of the Minnesota Court of Appeals has upheld a state agency's decision to keep researcher Lynn Rogers from putting radio collars on black bears.

But Rogers is claiming partial victory, saying the ruling allows him to once again place cameras in bear dens to broadcast the hibernating animals over the Internet.

Two years ago, the state Department of Natural Resources declined to renew Rogers' research permit to feed bears in Eagles Nest Township to gain their trust so he could observe their behavior. DNR officials argued that his work threatened public safety by making the bears comfortable around humans and teaching them that people can be a source of food.

At issue before the appeals court was whether Rogers needed a DNR permit to place tracking collars on bears. Rogers first applied for a research permit in 1999, and the DNR granted him one.

In the court's ruling, Judge John Rodenberg concluded that "feeding a bear and habituating it in order to keep it in one place while a radio collar is affixed to it" amounts to legal "possession" of the bear, which under Minnesota law requires a permit.

DNR Communications Director Chris Niskanen said the agency is "very satisfied" with the court's decision. It "confirms the agency's belief that it's the responsible agency for permitting wildlife research, and managing wildlife populations," he said.

But Rogers also praised the ruling, which stated that he does not need a DNR permit to place cameras in bear dens while they are hibernating.

"I am just thrilled that the judges saw the value of the den cams, and gave me the right to broadcast them to the world again this winter," he said.

Rogers conceded that it would be more difficult to find active bear dens without the use of radio tracking collars. But he said he already knew the locations of many dens, which bears often reuse.


Federal officials reject threatened status for wolves
Tuesday, August 04 2015
 
Written by Dan Kraker, MPR News,
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The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service on June 30 rejected a petition to classify the gray wolf as threatened under the federal Endangered Species Act.

In most states, wolves are listed as endangered and can only be killed for threatening a human life. But in Minnesota, where there are about 2,400 wolves, they are listed as threatened, and federal trappers can kill wolves within a half mile of a verified attack on pets or livestock.

In 2012, the Fish and Wildlife Service removed federal protections for the wolf in the Great Lakes region. But in December a judge reversed that decision.

When proposals emerged in Congress to remove wolves from endangered species protection altogether, the Humane Society of the United States asked the federal government to classify wolves everywhere as threatened.

The group called that a compromise between the more restrictive endangered listing for wolves and removing wolves from that list.

"This is something that we think you could extend throughout the country," said Ralph Henry, a Humane Society attorney. "It would alleviate a lot of the pressure that we're seeing, especially in the most populated areas like Minnesota, Michigan and Wisconsin."

The Fish and Wildlife Service said the petitioners didn't demonstrate that reclassifying the wolf was warranted.

Minnesota Public Radio News can be heard on MPR’s statewide radio network or online at www.mprnews.org.

Confronting Calhoun: a bike ride meets the living legacy of white supremacy
Tuesday, August 04 2015
 
Written by Junauda Petrus, TC Daily Planet,
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confronting calhoun 1.jpgIndependence Day 2015. We were Indigenous, Eritrian, Nigerian, Korean, Sudanese, Black-American, White, Puerto-Rican, Columbian, parents, dancers, teachers, artists, queer, avid cyclists, borrowing bicycles for the day, babies riding in the bicycle chariot of a parent.

And we were Minnesotans. We believed that the beautiful waters previously known by the Dakota of this land as Mde Maka Ska should no longer honor John C. Calhoun. This charmer enslaved Black people and fought to protect enslavement in the south. We were riding to change the name and we were beautiful, unexpected, and powerful.

Jeremy Little is the director of the Minnesota Black Riders Association. He is a dynamic young man in love with bicycling and the community. Little reached out to me and other activists and artists to help him organize a “Freedom Ride” on the 4th of July to Lake Calhoun in order to bring attention to this issue. We also had a culminating community BBQ.

We didn’t have much time to plan but once we got the ball rolling, the support and interest was amazing! We had beautiful bicycle caravans hailing from north and south Minneapolis as well as St. Paul. Volunteers were ready with food at Lake Calhoun for hungry riders and games for children. We wanted it to not only be revolutionary, but celebratory and joyful.

After we sang a protest song together, an older white man who approached the crowd and told us to “get over it,” that “George Washington owned slaves,” “those were the times” and all sorts of other white supremacist brainwashing that is used to justify naming public places for celebrated murderers, rapists, and enslavers.

“It shouldn’t surprise us that white supremacy has arrived to rear its ugly head,” said with elegance and earned wisdom by Nekima Levy-Pounds, Minneapolis NAACP president, activist and lawyer to the diverse group of peaceful and joyful bicyclists enjoying the day as we were interrupted by the irate and hateful bystander.


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