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Local Briefs
Newsleter
Friday, October 13 2017
 
Written by Catherine,
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Native Authors Breakfast Fundraiser 2017
Tuesday, October 10 2017
 
Written by The Circle,
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lindalagardeweb.jpg

Join Us for Breakfast with   
Linda LeGarde Grover

Friday, December 15, 2017
8:00 to 9:00 a.m.

Doors open at 7:30 for coffee 

The Circle board invites you to join us for our annual
Native Authors Breakfast Fundraiser to support The Circle,
the voice of Native journalism in the Twin Cities, serving the
Native community and regional readers for 37 years. 

Enjoy good conversation and a light breakfast with coffee and juice while listening to Native author Linda LaGarde as she reads from her new book, Onigamiising, and other works.

All Nations Indian Church, 1515 E. 23rd St., Minneapolis
$35 suggested donation

To RSVP and reserve your spot: call 612-722-3686 or email This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it

onigamiisingbookcoverimage.jpgLinda LeGarde Grover is a member of the Bois Forte Band of Ojibwe and a professor of American Indian Studies at the University of Minnesota Duluth. She is author of the short fiction collection The Dance Boots (U of Georgia Press 2010), novel The Road Back to Sweetgrass (U of Minnesota Press 2014), poetry collection The Sky Watched: Poems of Ojibwe Lives (Red Mountain Press 2016) and essay collection Onigamiising: Seasons of an Ojibwe Year (U of Minnesota Press 2017). Her writings have received the Flannery O'Connor Award, the Janet Heidinger Katka Prize, the Red Mountain Editor's Award, the Native Writers & Storytellers Fiction Award, and the Northeastern Minnesota Book Award for Poetry.

Onigamiising

From the publisher: Long before it came to be known as Duluth, the land at the western tip of Lake Superior was known to the Ojibwe as Onigamiising, “the place of the small portage.” There the Ojibwe lived in keeping with the seasons, moving among different camps for hunting and fishing, for cultivating and gathering, for harvesting wild rice and maple sugar. In Onigamiising Linda LeGarde Grover accompanies us through this cycle of the seasons, one year in a lifelong journey on the path to Mino Bimaadiziwin, the living of a good life. 

In fifty short essays, Grover reflects on the spiritual beliefs and everyday practices that carry the Ojibwe through the year and connect them to this northern land of rugged splendor. As the four seasons unfold—from Ziigwan (Spring) through Niibin and Dagwaagin to the silent, snowy promise of Biboon—the award-winning author writes eloquently of the landscape and the weather, work and play, ceremony and tradition and family ways, from the homey moments shared over meals to the celebrations that mark life’s great events. Now a grandmother, a Nokomis, beginning the fourth season of her life, Grover draws on a wealth of stories and knowledge accumulated over the years to evoke the Ojibwe experience of Onigamiising, past and present, for all time.

 

 

Oct 2017 Community Calendar
Friday, October 06 2017
 
Written by The Circle,
Average user rating    (0 vote)

Thru Oct. 14
Edgar Heap of Birds

The Bockley Gallery is will host an upcoming exhibition of Edgar Heap of Birds. The show will feature a range of Heap of Birds text-based works that spans three decades of his artistic practice, beginning in the mid-1980s. Also on view will be examples of his abstract, acrylic on canvas Neuf paintings and one commissioned public artwork that will be installed on the exterior wall of the gallery. Exhibit runs through Oct. 14. Gallery hours: Wednesday through Saturday, noon to 5pm. Bockley Gallery, 2123 W. 21st St., Minneapolis. For info, contact 612-377-4669 or email:  This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it

Thru Oct. 29
We the People

For its fall exhibition, We the People, Minnesota Museum of American Art invited four guest curators—Christopher Harrison (independent curator and artist), Johnnay Leenay (Minnesota Museum of American Art), Mary Anne Quiroz (Indigenous Roots Cultural Center), and Maggie Thompson (Two Rivers Art Gallery)—to present artworks with disparate cultural points of view, reflecting on the complexities of contemporary American identities. Artists include Star Wallowing Bull, Zackary Drucker, Rico Gatson, Susan Hauptman, Nooshin Hakim Javadi, Steve Ozone, and others. The exhibition is free and open to the public. We the People is on view through October 29 at the Historic Pioneer Endicott, 141 E. 4th St., St. Paul. For info, call 651-204-0700 or see: http://mmaa.org/wethepeople .

Thru Oct. 30
Gordon Coons Exhibit

The MacRostie Gallery will be displaying the work of Gordon Coon’s current exhibit Expressions of My Journey; Expressions of My Journey. Self-taught artist Gordon Coons creates works in a variety of mediums including linoleum block prints, paintings, pen and ink, carvings in stone and wood. The MacRostie Gallery will display his woodcut prints, vibrant duct-tape images, and Ojibwe woodland art style paintings. Inspired by Ojibwe petroglyphs, images, and stories from birch bark scrolls, these paintings are sometimes described as x-ray vision. He is an enrolled member of the Lac Courte Oreilles Ojibwe Tribe of Wisconsin. Opening Reception: October 6 from 4-7pm. MacRostie Art Center, 405 First Ave NW, Grand Rapids, MN. For info, contact 218-326-2697 or This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it Or see: macrostieartcenter.org .

Thru Nov. 17
OZHITOON (MAKE)

“Ozhitoon” is an exhibit showcasing quillwork from the Two Rivers Gallery summer quill class and mosaics created by youth from the Little Earth Youth Development Center, in partnership with Good Space Murals. Free and open to the public. Gallery Hours: Monday - Thursday, 10am - 4pm. Two Rivers Gallery, 1530 E. Franklin Ave., Minneapolis.

Thru April 22, 2018
Renewing What They Gave Us

“Renewing What They Gave Us: Native American Artists in Residence,”is an exhibit of original beadwork, birch bark and textile artwork by five contemporary American Indian artists on display alongside the MNHS artifacts that inspired them. The artists, Jessica Gokey, Pat Kruse, Denise Lajimodiere, Gwen Westerman and Holly Young, created the artwork as part of the MNHS Native American Artist-in-Residence program. Since 2014, the program has helped revive the study of technique, knowledge and lifeways associated with traditional forms of American Indian artistry. For info, see: http://www.minnesotahistorycenter.org/exhibits/renewing-what-they-gave-us .

Oct. 2-30
Ginew/Golden Eagle Youth Program

G/GE is an after school prevention program that teaches a 23 month resiliency curriculum. We have physical activities, sports, tutoring (Indian Youth Study Time) arts and crafts, and fieldtrips. We serve a meal each night and have limited transportation to and from the program within a designated service area. Mondays through Thursdays from 5pm-7pm. Mon and Tues: 5-10 year-olds meet from 5pm to 8pm. Wed. and Thurs.: 11 and older youth meet from 5-8pm. Free. MAICC, 1530 E. Franklin Ave., Minneapolis. For info, call 612-879-1708.

Oct. 3, 10, 17, 24, 31
Intro to Dakota/Ojibwe Language for youth

Intro to Dakota Language for youth. Taught by Dawi/Huha Maza, from 5-7pm. Intro to Ojibwe Language for youth, taught by Memegwesi, from 5-7pm. Free. Minneapolis American Indian Center, 1530 E. Franklin Minneapolis. For info, contact
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Oct. 3, 10, 17, 24, 31
Women’s Empowerment Group

Women’s Empowerment Group invites women within the community to come together to share their feelings, thoughts, experiences, and hopes in a safe place. The group discusses a range of topics to promote healing, including historical trauma, self-care, and lateral violence.  Indigenous practices such as smudging, talking circles, and art are incorporated to foster holistic health. 2-3:30pm. Indian Health Board Counseling and Support Clinic,1315 E. 24th St. Minneapolis. For info, call  612-721-9800 or see: http://indianhealthboard.com .

Oct. 4, 11, 18, 24
Girls’ LEGO Group

Girl’s LEGO Group at the Indian Health Board helps girls (ages 8 to 11) who may need additional skills or practice in managing frustration, improving self-esteem, and increasing social skills. We meet weekly on Wednesdays from 3:15 to 4:45pm. Indigenous practices such as smudging, talking circles, and art are incorporated to foster holistic health. Indian Health Board Counseling and Support Clinic, 1315 E. 24th St. Minneapolis. For info, call 612-721-9800 or see: http://indianhealthboard.com .

Oct. 4, 11, 18, 25
Ojibwe/Dakota Language
Intro to Dakota Language, taught by Cante Maza. From 5:30–7pm. Intermediate Ojibwe language taught by Memegwesi. From 5:30–7pm. Both are open to the community. Free. Minneapolis American Indian Center, 1530 E. Franklin Minneapolis. For info, contact This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it or This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it

Oct. 5
Native Poets/Artists

The New Museum for Archaic Media: An evening of Poem Films presents Heid E. Erdrich, Jonathan Thunder, Elizabeth Day, and Andrea Carlson. Erdrich will perform poems from her book, “Curator of Ephemera at the New Museum for Archaic Media” between screenings, followed by discussion with the filmmakers with whom Erdrich collaborated. Short films of Erdrich’s poems include Indigenous Elvis Works the Medicine Line, Undead Faerie Goes Great with India Pale Ale, It was Cloudy and Pre-Occupied. 6:30pm. Minneapolis Institute of Art, 2400 3rd Ave S, Minneapolis. For more info, see: https://new.artsmia.org/ event/the-new-museum-for-archaic-media-an-evening-of-poem-films-2 .

Oct. 5, 12, 19, 26
Ojibwe/Dakota Language

Intermediate Dakota Language, open to community, taught by Dawi /Huha Maza. 5-7pm. Intro to Ojibwe, open to community, taught by Memegwesi. 5-7pm. Free. Minneapolis American Indian Center, 1530 Ea. Franklin Ave., Minneapolis. For info, contact This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it or This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it

Oct. 5, 12, 19, 26
Niizh Manidoowag  Two-Spirit Group

Niizh Manidoowag Two-Spirit Group is an open group inviting two-spirit people to come together to share thoughts, feelings, and hopes with one another in a safe space. This group includes Indigenous wellness practices such as talking circles and smudging to foster holistic wellness. From 2:15 to 3:45pm. Indian Health Board Counseling and Support Clinic, 1315 E. 24th St. Minneapolis. For info, call 612-721-9800 or see: http://indianhealthboard.com .

Oct. 7, 8, 21, 22, Nov. 4, 5
Ogichidakwe Council Advocacy Training

Ogichidakwe Council Advocacy Training, Helping Victims/Survivors Of Sexual Violence & Abuse. The training is intended for community women helping family and friends who disclose sexual violence/abuse. Limited to 20 community members. Child Care and Transportation assistance available. 9am to 5pm each day. Elder’s Lodge, 1500 Magnolia Ave., East St. Paul. For info, contact Eileen Hudon at 763-244-5815. Register with Jessica Owen at 612-250-5907.

Oct. 9
Indigenous Peoples Day

Join us for a community-planned Indigenous Peoples Day 2017 celebration. Round Dance and Rally. MC: Deanna Standing Cloud. Speakers: A representative from Stop Line 3 efforts, and a representative from MMIW efforts will be in attendance. Performances: Wakemup Productions, Oyate Hotanin. 4-7pm. Minneapolis American Indian Center, 1430 E. Franklin Ave, Minneapolis. For info, see: www.indigenouscities.com .

Oct. 9
St. Paul’s Indigenous Peoples Parade

Join us for the St. Paul Indigenous People’s Day Parade. The theme this year is "Protect Mother Earth". Start time is 11am. The parade line up begins at 10am at the parking lot of American Indian Magnet School, off 3rd St. at Earl in St. Paul. The route is the same as last year, from AIMS to Mounds Park. The park will have performers, student speakers, singing, dancing and celebrations of Indigenous Peoples. All participants are encouraged to create floats, banners, and posters to make a statement on ways Indigenous people can protect our Earth. Each registered group/class will be judged along the parade path and trophies will be awarded to the best group/class. To register your group, contact Pam Gokey at 651-793-3803 or at: This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it  

Oct. 10
Family Education Diabetes Series (FEDS)

A free series that brings together American Indians and their families to share knowledge and resources to prevent and manage diabetes. Free. Interfaith Action of Greater Saint Paul, Department of Indian Work, 1671 Summit Ave., St. Paul. Contact Sarah Goodall at 651-789-3862 or This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it The event will also be held on these dates:
• Nov. 14
• Dec. 12

Oct. 10-11
NIBI MIINAWAA MANOOMIN

NIBI MIINAWAA MANOOMIN: Gaa wiijigaabawitaadiwaad (Accountable Relationships). The 5th biennial symposium invites tribal members and University personnel to meet, share information and learn from
each other about ways to protect water and wild rice for future generations. This year’s event will
discuss what accountable relationships require and how we can agree to commited action that is trusting and binding. White Earth Chairman Terry Tibbetts, University of Minnesota President Eric Kaler, Karen Diver, an elder panel and other tribal and university representatives will join us as as we seek to learn what accountability means, and how we can commit to a respectful, collaboratively developed agenda with agreed upon outcomes and deadlines. Shooting Star Hotel and Event Center, 777 Casino Road, Mahnomen. For info, see: www.cfans.umn.edu/wildrice .

Oct. 11
MAICC Networking Event

The Minnesota American Indian Chamber of Commerce’s Networking Event. Mingle with the Board of Directors and members of the Chamber. The Board is in the midst of strategic planning and want to hear from you! Register now to reserve your place. 5:30-8pm Minnesota American Indian Chamber of Commerce. For info, contact This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it or 612-877-2117.

Oct. 17, 19, Nov. 7, 9
AIFACS Foster Care Meetings

AIFACS is hosting more foster care/shelter home informational sessions in Minneapolis and St. Paul. St. Paul: October 17th from 2pm-3pm and from 5:30pm-6:30pm at the American Indian Family and Children's Services Office. Minneapolis: October 19th from 2pm-3pm at the Mpls American Indian Center. St. Paul: November 7th from 2pm-3pm and 5:30pm-6:30pm. Minneapolis: November 9th from 2pm-3pm. Light food and beverage will be served. RSVP to Kelly 651-223-8526 or email This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it

Oct.  17
Indian Child Welfare Education Day

Please join us as we share the strengths and wisdom within our community. ICWA Case Plan from Parent's Perspective. Active Efforts: Helping vs. Impeding. Presenters: Julie Williams, Director: White Earth M.O.M.’s Program. Resource Panel Bright Beginnings – Minneapolis American Indian Center. Natives Against Heroin – White Earth Urban Center. Parent Mentors – ICWA Law Center Indian Advocates – ICWA Law Center. More Presenters TBA. Registration at 8am. Programing goes from 8:30am to 4pm. CEU’s will be provided. There is no cost to attend this event. Lunch is provided. Mitchell Hamline School of Law, 875 Summit Ave, St Paul. Registration is at: www.eventbrite.com/e/icwa-case-plan-from-parents-perspective-active-efforts-helping-vs-impeding-tickets-38010016984. For info, contact Sandy White Hawk at This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it or 651-442-4872.

Oct. 18
Elder’s Health Day

This event is by appointment only. Includes medical visit, dental visit, flu shots and other immunizations, and a light meal. 9am to 12:30pm. To schedule an appointment, call 612-721-9800. Indian Health Board, 1315 E. 24th St, Minneapolis

Oct. 18
The Sioux Chef Book Signing

Authors Sean Sherman and Beth Dooley will present and sign copies of The Sioux Chef's Indigenous Kitchen. Indigenous American fruits and vegetables, the wild and foraged ingredients, game and fish. Locally sourced, seasonal, “clean” ingredients and nose-to-tail cooking are nothing new to Sean Sherman, the Oglala Lakota chef and founder of The Sioux Chef. In his first book, The Sioux Chef’s Indigenous Kitchen, Sherman shares his approach to creating boldly seasoned foods that are vibrant, healthful, at once elegant and easy. Open house event and book signing. Samples made from recipes in the cookbook will be served. Cash bar. Books will be available for purchase from Birchbark Books. 6-9pm. Aster Cafe River Room, 125 SE Main St, Minneapolis. Please RSVP at: z.umn.edu/101817.

Oct. 19 (deadline)
First Nations' Native Arts Initiative

First Nations will award 15 supporting Native arts grants of up to $32,000 each to Native-controlled nonprofit organizations and tribal government programs that have existing programs in place that support Native artists and the field of traditional Native arts. Entities eligible include U.S.-based, Native-controlled, nonprofit 501(c)3 organizations, tribes and tribal departments, tribal 7871 entities, or Native community-based groups with eligible fiscal sponsors. Applicants must be located in and serve tribal communities in one of the following states: North Dakota, South Dakota, Minnesota, Wisconsin, New Mexico, Arizona, California, Oregon and Washington. Applications are due by October 19. For info, see: www.firstnations.org/grantmaking/2017NAI .

Oct. 20
Friday Family Fun Night

Join us for a Halloween themed Family Fun Night. This event is free and is open to community. Activities for the whole family (parents or guardians must accompany children). Games, Language, Cultural and Art Activity, Open Gym, Nutrition Demonstration. Healthy beverages and light refreshments available. 5:30–8pm. MIAC, 1530 E. Franklin Ave. Minneapolis. For info, contact This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it , This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it , or This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it

Oct. 20
Tobacco Prevention and Wellness Symposium

Native youth, ages 12-18, are invited to the Ain Dah Yung Center’s 8th Annual Tobacco Prevention and Wellness Symposium. The symposium provides youth the opportunity to learn about living a healthy lifestyle and contributing to healthy communities, all within a cultural context. Youth will have hands on learning experiences and connect with community leaders regarding the risks of harmful use of commercial tobacco, substance abuse, and diabetes awareness that promote living a healthy lifestyle. Bring your regalia for a mini-powwow. Regalia is optional. Continental breakfast, lunch, dessert snacks and refreshments provided. 9am-5pm. DoubleTree, 411 Minnesota St., St. Paul. For info, see: www.eventbrite.com/e/ain-dah-yung-centers-8th-annual-tobacco-wellness-prevention-symposium-tickets-34084969060 . Or contact: Contact Dennis Gilbert at This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it or Travis DeCory at This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it

Oct. 20
GenIndigenous Response Fund

The NAP GenIndigenous Response Fund provides grants up to $5,000 to youth organizing groups responding to current moments in ways that build long-term power for Native youth. This fund provides grants to organizations playing leadership roles in their local communities while considering efforts to support the long term engagement of youth leaders in advocacy efforts. The submission deadline is October 20, 2017. Groups applying must be 501(c)(3) or have a fiscal agent which is a 501(c)(3) entity. Organizations without nonprofit status or a fiscal agent should contact This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it For info, see: http://nativephilanthropy.org/programs/generation-indigenous/ genindigneous-response-fund .

Oct. 20
2017 Fair: This Is Not A Test  
White Supremacy, Climate Change, and the Future of Our Schools. This social Justic Education Fair brings together educators, students, parents, and communities from across the Twin Cities Metro to collaborate, network, and organize social justice in education. Childcare, breakfast and lunch provided. The workshop is free but donations are welcome. 8am to 5pm. Patrick Henry High School, 4320 Newton Ave., Minneapolis. For info contact: This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it or 612-787-2272.

Oct. 21
Sioux Chef Cooking Demonstration

Join Sioux Chef Sean Sherman for a series of cooking demonstrations based on his new book The Sioux Chef’s Indigenous Kitchen, an introduction to the modern indigenous cuisine of the Dakota and Minnesota territories. 30-minute demos will take place at 12:30pm and 2pm. Cost is included with site admission. 12:30-2:30pm. Mill City Museum, 704 S. 2nd St., Minneapolis. For more info, see: www.mnhs.org/event/4979 .

Oct. 21, Nov. 18
Linda LeGarde Grover/Duluth

Linda LeGarde Grover will be at Zenith Bookstore for a reading and signing of her new book, Onigamiising: Seasons of an Ojibwe Year. Long before it was known as Duluth, the land at the western tip of Lake Superior was known to the Ojibwe as Onigamiising, “the place of the small portage.” In fifty short essays, Linda LeGarde Grover reflects on the spiritual beliefs and everyday practices that carry the Ojibwe through the year and connect them to this northern land of rugged splendor. 2pm to 4pm. Zenith Bookstore, 318 N Central Ave., Duluth. For more info, see: www.upress.umn.edu/press/ events .
• Nov. 18: At Barnes & Noble in Duluth: 12-3pm. Barnes & Noble Duluth, 1600 Miller Trunk Hwy., Duluth.

Oct. 21
Caring for the Animals Clinic

MN SNAP will take part in the Little Earth Animal Clinic, sponsored by Pet Haven, Inc. of MN and supported by The Native America Humane Society and VeTouch. Free spay and neuter surgeries, flea and tick prevention, heartworn tests and vaccinations for Little Earth pets. Pet Haven will cover the cost of surgeries and vaccinations for Little Earth pets. MNSNAP will be using the parking lot in the front of 2501 building. First come first serve. 9am to 5pm. Dog surgery check-in at 8am. Cats and rabbits surgery check-in at 8:30am. Little Earth, 2501 Cedar Ave. S., Minneapolis. For info, contact Little Earth of United Tribes Management at 612-729-9361 or 612-704-3694.

Oct. 23, 24, 26, 27
MPCA Air Permit Training

Training and information about how to comment when facilities apply for permits to emit air pollutants. October 23, 24 at MPCA in Saint Paul. October 26, 27 at the Minneapolis Urban League. For info, contact Say Yang at 612-345-8255 or This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it

Oct. 25
NO overdose Town Hall

Raise awareness and build strong partnerships to prevent Opioid-related deaths that have risen to crisis levels in Hennepin County. 5:30-7:30pm. Held at Gichitwaa Kateri Church, 3045 Park Ave. S., Minneapolis. For info, call Carmen Bibiano at 612-807-2449.

Oct. 27
MIWRC Fall Feast

Please join us for our Fall Feast. Free meal, including creamy wild rice soup, salad, dessert and more. Raffle for a beautiful quilt -- winner will be announced at 2pm. All community members welcome. 10:30am-2pm. MIWRC, 2300 15th Ave S, Minneapolis. For more info, call 612-728-2000.

Oct. 30
AIFACS Stakeholder Gathering

What is the future of foster care and what is AIFACS’ role in creating this future? Come share your thoughts. All are welcome and encouraged to attend. Free childcare and lunch. Please RSVP and also let us know if you’ll be needing childcare and what ages/number of children. 12pm-4pm. For info, call Kelly or Lucy at 651-223-8526.

Oct. 30
IFACS Stateholder Gathering

American Indian Family and Children's Services is hosting a Stakeholder Gathering from 12pm-4pm at the Minneapolis American Indian Center. Childcare is available and there will be a meal. We want to hear from anyone who holds an interest in the foster care/child welfare system. This includes GAL, county/tribal workers, foster parents, foster children, former foster children, judges, healthcare providers, elders, relatives of foster children, other community members, etc. If you plan to attend and need childcare, please RSVP with the number and ages of children. American Indian Family and Children's Services, 25 Empire Dr., St. Paul. For info, contact Kelly Peet at 651-223-8526, option 3.

 

Nov. 1
Heid E. Erdrich, Linda LeGarde Grover, David Lawrence Grant and Thomas Dillon Redshaw will read from their works
Heid E. Erdrich is the author and editor of eight books, most recently the poetry collection Curator of Ephemera at the New Museum for Archaic Media. Heid’s recent awards include a Minnesota State Arts Board grant and a McKnight fellowship in prose. Heid is Ojibwe enrolled at Turtle Mountain. She teaches in the Augsburg College Low-residency MFA program. Linda LeGarde Grover (Boise Forte Ojibwe) is the author of the new collection of essays, Onigamiising: Seasons of an Ojibwe Year (University of Minnesota Press 2017). Her short fiction collection The Dance Boots received the Flannery O’Connor Award as well as the Janet Heidinger Kafka Prize; her novel The Road Back to Sweetgrass (Minnesota, 2014) received the Wordcraft Circle of Native Writers and Storytellers 2016 Fiction Award, and her poetry collection The Sky Watched: Poems of Ojibwe Lives received the Northeastern Minnesota Book Award and the Red Mountain Press Editor’s Award. David Lawrence Grant is a Twin Cities-based writer. As a playwright, he has been commissioned to write work for the Minnesota Historical Society, VocalEssence and Mixed Blood Theater, among others. As a screenwriter, he wrote for Russell Simmons’ Def Pictures, HBO, and the Showtime Network and is a past recipient of screenwriting fellowships from the Minnesota State Arts Board and the McKnight Foundation. David currently teaches screenwriting at Film North (formerly IFP). Thomas Dillon Redshaw is the author of Heimaey (1974) and The Floating World (1979) and fugitive broadsides and chapbooks. His poems have appeared in American little magazines and in such Irish publications as Cyphers, Poetry Ireland, Southword, and The Irish Times. He edited Well Dreams: Essays on John Montague (2004) and served as the editor of Eire-Ireland (1974-1996) and New Hibernia Review (1996-2006), both of whose pages featured contemporary Irish poetry.
(Curated by Michael Kiesow Moore and Ardie Medina.) 7:00 p.m. The Bockley Gallery, 2123 W 21st Street, Minneapolis (couple doors down from Birchbark Books). For info, see:  www.bockleygallery.com

Nov. 3-5
Women's Congress for Future Generations

This is the third Women's Congress and we are back with another opportunity to elevate the voices of women in protecting Mother Earth and Future Generations. Come join us as we gather around the Sacred Circle and deepen our commitment to Mother Earth. This year’s focus is on Climate, Health, and Justice. We are committed to healing the wounds among and between us, to hearing each other’s stories and to finding a way forward together as told to us by the Anishinaabe in the 7th Fire Prophecy. From Nov. 3 starting at 10:30 am to Nov. 5, ending at 12:30 pm. Cost varies according to ability to pay. Earle Brown Heritage Center, 6155 Earle Brown Dr, Brooklyn Center. For info, contact Elizabeth Anders at 612-986-4327 or  This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it ; or Ann Manning at 612-802-8513 or This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it Register at wcffg.org .

Nov. 13
Hopi Water Protector Vernon Masayesva

Vernon Masayesva, former chair of the Hopi nation in Arizona and founder and executive director of Black Mesa Trust, is an internationally respected speaker and activist for preserving water resources and the environment for future generations. Masayesva is a Hopi elder of the Coyote Clan from the village of Hotevilla, one of the oldest continuously inhabited human settlements in North America.  He resigned as chair of the Hopi tribal council to protest the decision to allow Peabody Coal Company to consume billions of gallons of precious fossil water from an arid region as a cheap way to slurry coal to an electricity generating station 273 miles away in Nevada. In 1998, he founded Black Mesa Trust (www.blackmesatrust.org), whose motto is, “Paatuaquatsi, Water is Life.”  An international speaker on water and Hopi values, he has been honored by activists including Peter Coyote and Jane Fonda and scientists including renowned author and water researcher Dr. Masaru Emoto from Japan. As a result of his commitment to preserving water and the environment, he was honored by President Bill Clinton as an “Environmental Hero.” Event is a 7pm, with a reception with Mr. Masayesva after the event. Sponsored by Plymouth’s Caring for Creation and American Indian Initiative committees. The event is free, with plenty of free parking.  Plymouth Congregational Church, 1900 Nicollet Ave, Minneapolis, MN 55403. For info, call 612-871-7400.

, at 7pm.

David E. Larsen
Friday, October 06 2017
 
Written by The Circle,
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David E. Larsen
December 3, 1941 - September 2, 2017

obitdavelarsen.jpgDavid E. Larsen, “Hpu Hpu” (Dobbie) “Wahinkpe Ohitika” meaning Brave Arrow, age 75 from Caŋsayapi (Lower Sioux Community) made his journey to the spirit world September 2 at North Memorial Medical Center in Robbinsdale after a brief illness.

David was born December 3, 1941 in Pipestone, MN to David J. and Emmarica (Wabasha) Larsen. He served in the US Navy as a radar operator from 1960-1964. David was a strong passionate man who loved and dedicated his life to his Dakota community and to Indigenous people worldwide. His passion took many forms. He was an educator of Dakota History and Culture at the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis and Minnesota State University Mankato. He taught and mentored Indian Students at Redwood Valley High School and most recently at Columbia Heights Schools. 

David was elected to the Lower Sioux Tribal Council and served three terms as Chairman. He was instrumental in bringing the first real revenue to Indian communities by initiating Indian gaming in the state of Minnesota. His commitment was unending. He served as spiritual advisor for Native men and women at MN Correctional Facilities, and at the MN Veterans Hospital in St. Cloud. Dave was well known for his scholarship and continued efforts to share the true history of the Dakota people. He was regularly called upon by schools, churches, historical societies, and universities to share his knowledge. A traditional dancer, he will be remembered by his powwow family. When he wasn’t dancing, his broadcast journalism voice could be heard emceeing at powwows across Minnesota.

The family he leaves to cherish his laughter, humility and great smile include wife Valerie; son Scott; daughters: Teri (Brian), Becky (Nate), and Barbie; stepson Greg (Karla); 24 grandchildren; 7 great grandchildren; brothers: Bob (LaVeda), & Curt (Cathie); sister Lana; and many other relatives and cherished friends. He is preceded in death by many relatives and friends.
Funeral Services were held at St. Cornelia’s Episcopal Church Hall at the Lower Sioux Community. Interment is in St. Cornelia’s Cemetery. Online condolences may be sent at www.stephensfuneralservice.com . Stephens Funeral Service - Redwood Valley Funeral Home assisted the family with arrangements.


Hurricanes
Friday, October 06 2017
 
Written by Ricey Wild,
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My big black ‘kitten’ The RZA (who is only four years old) was walking in front of me in the hallway with his tail up high. He clearly wanted something, like treats, and I said to him, “You have all that food, clean water and a soft bed!” I stopped in my tracks and felt terrible for the millions of Americans in Puerto Rico who don’t have that security.

Ahem! Excuse me while I take my anxiety meds. I’ve been in plenty of blizzards, floods and tornadoes but the magnitude of what Hurricane Maria inflicted on Puerto Rico is beyond devastating, to say the least. What worries me most is that another such anomaly weather-wise will hit them again just as they begin to recover from Irma and Maria due to climate change (IMHO). I wonder if these types of catastrophes are just the harbingers of what’s to come.

I cry for my fellow sentient beings. I do not, as a practice, say to myself, “Self, at least you’re not homeless, starving ‘insert any 3rd world country and I include US Indian reservations here’ or disease ridden with no access to health care.” Yeah. I get to be warm and dry. I can call people and let them know I’m all right and sleep comfortably even with my physical pain. So I don’t really have anything to complain about except how my Taino descended relatives are being treated by the US Government – which is headed by the most disgusting White Supremacist ever. And there have been too many.

Just in case you missed any of my dozens of column references about how I was in Hurricane Wilma in Mexico on the Riviera Maya ;) in 2005, here you go again. Yikes. I just now had to grow gills again, remembering the humidity. Well, before we were shuttled to a hurricane shelter on the resort grounds, I put in a call to my only child to basically say goodbye, because I didn’t have any clue how things were going to go. Just wondering if I would ever see him and my family again was torturous.

That is where all of our fellow Puerto Rican American citizens are right now –  in that grey cloud of uncertainty of not knowing if their loved ones know they are all right. I saw a piece on the Governor of Puerto Rico saying that 45 has been in touch with him and offered support. I can’t say that I believe 45 because Puerto Rico is mostly brown people, and sadly Thee Olde Dotard is not a fan of naturally tanned people. Prove me wrong and I will hand write a letter to you stating this.

Then, into my little nest of comfort, North Korea and Venezuela are dusting off their war kits in anticipation of US aggression. REALLY, really??? Can we just please all go back to hunting, gathering, gardening and bartering? This capitalistic society is simply not working for all of humanity and in my honest opinion it is killing us. Even if we laid off the nuclear bombs and nuclear plants, where would we put them? I think of that character from the TV series “Lost” who kept pushing the keyboard to prevent being obliterated. So, where do we go from here?

Indigenous Peoples worldwide had it all under control until colonists from tiny islands and fiefdoms in Europe thought they had a better plan. Divide and conquer – which they did with efficient vicious genocidal tactics.

Which brings me to this: I watched a facebook interview of a survivor of Nazi torture actually forgive her tormentor Mengele. Truth be told I’m not there. I’m not at that point nor do I think I ever will be, considering the centuries of hate, genocide, torture and lies the colonists have inflicted on us Indigenous Peoples. And that is still going on right now. And for what? To benefit the filthy millionaires who support sucking every sacred mineral and resource from our Mother Earth. Wow! And the Christians believe in an afterlife? Good luck in Hell (not).

Peace be upon you my Kin. In the direct tunnel of hateful flames we will still carry on by dancing, singing, praying and doing what we have always done – depending on each other for help when we need it. I really need it now more than ever, medically.

I have taken so many people into my home when they had none. They all let me down bigly. Yet I am still empathetic to those who need help right now. When will I ever learn? HAHAHAHAHHAHAAAHAAH!

Still, I am gonna donate a big $10 bucks for Puerto Rico. I do what I can.

BTW, I’m going as an Indian for Halloween, buckskin-n-all!

 

 

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