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Local Briefs
Spotlight On: Charly Etzkorn
Friday, February 07 2014
 
Written by Alfred Walking Bull,
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charlie_etzkorn-web.jpgSeven year-old Cheyenne River Sioux Tribal citizen Charly Etzkorn sang the National Anthem at the home opener for the Minnesota Swarm lacrosse game on Jan. 19.

The game was also the Swarm's Native American Heritage Day where they paid tribute to the Native roots of the game with a traditional version of the game at half-time featuring the Oneida Warriors and Prairie Island Indian Community's lacrosse teams. The Hoka Hey Singers also rendered an honor song for the 8,000 audience members in attendance for supporting the traditional Native American game.

Etzkorn said of her time in the spotlight, “It was really fun. I was nervous but it was really fun.”

Thousands Pack Final Hearing for Proposed PolyMet Mine
Friday, February 07 2014
 
Written by Elizabeth Dunbar/Dan Kraker, MPR News,
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Minnesota Public Radio News can be heard on MPR's statewide radio network or online at minnesota.publicradio.org .

The public's last chance to speak in front of hundreds about why they like or loathe PolyMet's plan to mine copper and nickel in northeastern Minnesota went out with a bang.

More than 2,100 people packed a Saint Paul RiverCentre ballroom, matching in size but surpassing in feistiness the combined 2,000 or so people who attended two earlier meetings in Duluth and Aurora. There were standing ovations, boos, laughs and even a guy with a guitar and harmonica who sang out his fears for Minnesota if the state embraces PolyMet, which would be the state's first copper-nickel mine.

Moderator Aimee Gourlay asked the crowd on several occasions to avoid interrupting the speakers with applause so they could maximize their three-minute time limit to speak. Those requests mostly went unheeded.


Native Business Grows With Values and Guidance
Friday, February 07 2014
 
Written by Alfred Walking Bull,
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native_business_grows_with_values_and_guidance-web.jpgBusiness continued to grow in the Minneapolis Native American community with the latest class of graduates from the Fall 2013 Plan It! Entrepreneur Training Program on Jan. 16.

The program is offered by Bii Gii Wiin Community Development Loan Fund, which was established to promote home ownership throughout the Native community in Minnesota, in partnership with Neighborhood Development Center. Eight students in the program spent 11 weeks, meeting at Bii Gii Wiin offices on Franklin Avenue, learning how to start a business and complete their business plans.

The ties between the program and the Native business community run deep. Mike Goze, American Indian Community Development Corporation CEO, has a personal and rewarding relationship with the program. “A number of years ago, my son Tony when through this exact same class and we started a company and this year we did somewhere between 6 and 7 million dollars worth of work. The kind of business you want is a profitable one. That is the key.”

What's New In the Community: February 2014
Friday, February 07 2014
 
Written by The Circle Staff,
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HONOR THE EARTH GRANTS OVER $120,000 TO INDIGENOUS PROJECTS

CALLAWAY, Minn. – Honor the Earth, in collaboration with the Headwaters Fund, the Indigo Girls, Medicine for the People and a number of individual and institutional donors, announce grants of $120,000 to Indigenous grassroots organizations across North America. In this grant cycle, Honor the Earth has been able to support organizations working in restorative agriculture, honoring traditional cultural practices, protection of sacred sites and in opposition to destruction of water, land and life.

Organizations include: Hopi Tutskwa Permaculture, on the Hopi reservation, for working in restorative agriculture and to initiate hands-on learning projects and hosts workshops that support Hopi youth and community to develop skills and capacity in rebuilding sustainable communities.


Serving Those In Need
Thursday, January 09 2014
 
Written by Alfred Walking Bull,
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serving those in need.jpgCelebrating the holidays with family on the reservation is a tradition that's familiar to most Native Americans living in the Twin Cities. For Lorna Her Many Horses, known to most as Emmy, it's an opportunity to give back to the children and elders of the Rosebud Sioux Tribe.

It started as a personal summer cleaning project that quickly progressed into a relief mission for her home reservation. For the second-poorest reservation in the country with an unemployment rate as high as 85 percent, every day items like clothing can be a struggle for some to provide for children and elders, particularly in the more remote communities.

“Any time I have gone back, I've taken things that were mine that I didn't want anymore to the the Spotted Tail Family Center. This summer, I had a lot of friends who were just getting rid of stuff. In August, I just put something on Facebook, asking if people had items to go to the children's home. At first I thought, no one's going to give me anything and I was going to be embarrassed. But the more people who saw it, the more people contacted me about donating, I was overwhelmed.”

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