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Local Briefs
VISUAL ARTS REVIEW: All My Relations presents provocative images in Maggie Thompson's “Where I Fit”
Friday, April 04 2014
 
Written by Mary Delorie, TC Daily Planet,
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pocahotness_where_i_fit.jpgWhen you think of your cultural and ethnic identity, is there a piece of cloth – a sown or painted tapestry, a beaded headband, a knitted cable sweater, a special quilt made by the matriarch in your family – that helps you honor and celebrate who you are? Cloth and/or textiles are often overlooked as key cultural touchstones in modern day society, but they are the focus of Maggie Thompson's solo exhibition at All My Relations Gallery. She uses textiles to ask important questions about family, identity and culture. As a Native American woman (Fond du Lac Ojibwe), Thompson uses this show to “dig deeper into the notions of her identity focusing on issues of cultural appropriation and Native authenticity through the rigid ideas of blood quantum and stereotyping.”

Her show is socially powerful with hints of nostalgia, deep-rooted sadness, and an anger that bubbles up along the edges. All the pieces showcase Thompson’s talents when it comes to color, patterns, and fabric types. She also pushes boundaries when it comes to textiles incorporating multimedia elements – screen-printing photographs, gold and silver threads, foam cookie cutters and also cornhusks and bottle caps.

The artist was initially an architectural student at the Rhode Island School of Design, so there are elements of her weaving and knitting that certainly draw from this, like straight lines and geometric patterns intentionally building a whole from smaller parts. Thompson recalls feeling like an artist even when she was very young, long before her textile degree from RISD.


Fond du Lac Follies
Friday, April 04 2014
 
Written by Jim Northrup,
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I really like winter. The cold and the snow stay outside my little HUD house. I especially like the tree shadows on the snow, the gravity defying clumps of snow that hang onto the pine branches, the cold wind that reminds me I should have put on one more layer.

I hear people complaining that this winter has gone on too long, they want to see spring. I just ignore them and enjoy what we have.

Very soon we shall begin our sugar bush. We have plenty of firewood. and we found a new source for the gallon milk jugs we use. My son Joe is showing his son Joe how to carve taps.

Another seasonal cycle for these Anishinaabeg will begin soon.

****

It Ain't Easy Being Indian
Friday, April 04 2014
 
Written by Ricey Wild,
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ricey wild.jpgYet more wintry weather is on the way and there’s not a damn thing I can do about it. I mean, really??? Eh … I along with all the other people who are suffering severe winter-itis are beyond ready for spring. Shoot. The first mosquito that bites me this year I won’t even smack it, I’ll just let it feast until it bloats up and falls off my skin. But only the one though.

To come out of this endless winter somewhat sane I have taken to pretending that every new snowfall is the first one of winter because that’s the only way I can save myself from going bat-shit crazy. Another thing I’m doing is I joined a gardening class! In Ojibwe language it’s “Gitigaan” and it was great. There were Indian tacos to eat and prizes; I won and picked out organic stuff for soil. I saw a lot of familiar faces that already are long time gardeners who have a lot of knowledge I need to begin my own little garden.

Last year in June I became a Master Naturalist so I’m pretty sure I will be able to handle a 3-by-6 foot raised container garden. If and when the snow ever melts, it could happen … maybe. Prior to this next adventure I liked to joke about my amazing dandelion 'garden' and that people came for miles around to see it but I’m serious about becoming a gardener, a grower of vegetables and herbs so I can eat healthier. I read a lot and what I’m reading about genetically modified organism (GMO) crops scares me because we the public don’t really know what is in that produce! Ewwww!!!

Political Matters: Next steps for PolyMet
Friday, April 04 2014
 
Written by Mordecai Specktor,
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In March, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency weighed in on the Supplemental Draft Environmental Impact Statement on the PolyMet sulfide mine, near Babbit, in northeastern Minnesota. The EPA gave the copper-nickel mining project – which is called NorthMet – a rating of “EC-2,” with the “EC” standing for “environmental concerns.”

“The rating means that federal regulators still have concerns about potential environmental effects of the proposed $650 million project and that they want to see more analysis and a clearer explanation of how pollution problems will be resolved,” the Star Tribune noted, regarding the EC-2 grade. “Specifically, they asked for more detail on issues that have dogged the project for months: how long contaminated water will have to be treated in future decades and how PolyMet’s ‘financial assurance’ will protect the state against unforeseen financial and environmental costs.”

The EPA’s recent rating is an improvement over the failing grade the agency gave the NorthMet project in October 2009, which sent PolyMet Mining, a Canadian-based corporation, back to the drawing board. Four years later, the SDEIS came out. In my February column, I reported on the public hearing held in St. Paul (other hearings took place in Duluth and Aurora) and noted that the Ojibwe bands up north have expressed concerns with baseline data about water flow from the proposed mine site. The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources responded to the tribal concerns, and stated that it is “reviewing new stream flow data for the Partridge River.”

April 2014 Calendar
Thursday, April 03 2014
 
Written by The Circle Staff,
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Ongoing

NACC MNsure Navigators are still able to assist those who have no income or who are low-income in applying for Medicaid and MinnesotaCare. If you attempted to apply for MNsure and had issues with the application, you may qualify for an extension.

For more information, contact: Lori Williams, 612-872-8086, ext. 1013, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it ; Sandra Lorentz, 612-872-8086, ext. 1018, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it ; or Patti DuFault, 612-872-8086, ext. 1045, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it


Through May 31

“Where I Fit”

Textile works by Maggie Thompson (Fond du Lac Ojibwe). All My Relations Gallery, 1414 E. Franklin Ave., Minneapolis, MN, 612-235-4970, www.AllMyRelationsArts.com.


April 5

Food and Farm Conversations

Please join us to connect with people, share ideas and create community. Local, healthy food prepared by Austin Bartold and the Waite House Kitchen. Child care available. Free event, space is limited, RSVP to Lannesse Baker at 612-721-9886 or email This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it 11 a.m.-2 p.m., All Nations Indian Church, 1515 E 23rd Street, Minneapolis, MN


Starting April 7

Dakota Language Immersion Early Childhood Program

Wicoie Nandagikendan will offer a Dakota Language Program Immersion experience for preschool children from 9:30 a.m. to noon for children 18 months to 5 years-old. For more information contact Diane Seurer, Four Directions Family Center, 2438 18th Ave. South, Minneapolis, MN, 612-722-0766 or email This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it


April 9 deadline

Construction Trade Training

Summit Academy OIC is accepting applications for construction jobs for the new football stadium and for free construction trade training. Training for pipefitters, plumbers, ironworkers and sheet metal workers begins in April for 20 weeks. No out of pocket costs.

For more information, contact Tiffany Hand, Little Earth Employment Director, 612-455-2831.


April 9

Circle of Generations

Dakota Language with Neil McKay, 4-5 p.m.; Manido Bimibatoowin (Spiritual Running): First Nations Unite; Outfit Repair/Tips with Wayne Reyes and Miskwa DesJarlait; Naagadawendamowin, Wiiyawimaa, Aabiziijigan (Mind, Body, Medicine) with Linda EagleSpeaker and Donna LaChapelle; Makizin-ataagewin/Han'pana (Moccasin Games) with Grady Renville; Teaching Circle, 5 to 7:30 p.m. Minneapolis American Indian Center, 1530 E. Franklin Ave., Minneapolis, MN. For more information, call Stephanie Thompson at 612-879-1768 or email This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it


April 10

Circle of Generations Ojibwemowin (Ojibwe Language)

Joe Spears, 5-6 p.m., Minneapolis American Indian Center, 1530 E. Franklin Ave., Minneapolis, MN. For more information, call Stephanie Thompson at 612-879-1768 or email This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

April 15

Celebrating Equity and Diversity in Faculty Publications

Join us for a reading in celebration of equity and diversity in University of Minnesota faculty publications. Refreshments will be provided. Brenda Child will read from her recent book “Holding Our World Together: Ojibwe Women and the Survival of the Community.” Zenzele Isoke will read from her book “Urban Black Woman and the Politics of Resistance.” 4:30 to 6 p.m., Elmer L. Andersen Library, Room 120, 222 21st Ave. South, Minneapolis, MN.

 


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