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Local Briefs
Nick-izms: Rez Born, Urban Raised
Monday, September 08 2014
 
Written by Nick Metcalf,
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jpeg_pic.jpgAs Native people, from a diverse world views, we have a lot more in common than we don’t. ‘Am I Indian enough?’, ‘Living in an urban environment and on the rez, am I indian?’, ‘What is being Indian?’, ‘How do we reconcile our painful histories so we survive, as a people?’

For a culture to survive it must adapt. It must remain relevant with the sociopolitical community constructs that enable it to survive. Twenty years ago I moved to the Twin Cities; it was 1987 when I fell in love with The Cities. I was a wide-eyed kid from the rural Rosebud Reservation in South Dakota, on the end of summer trip for a college prep program, Upward Bound. The Twin Cities pulsated with excitement and called for me to discover it.

With the blessing of my parents and the love of my family, I embarked on new opportunities and the challenge of attending college at the University of South Dakota in Vermillion, S.D. I would return back here to work for ValleyFair for a summer when my love affair with Minnesota deepened.

The vibrant community of social activism pulsated. I come from a family that is active in tribal politics and understands how essential it is to be an active community member. Once I completed my undergraduate, I dreamed of Minnesota. The Twin Cities, the place where AIM began and their call to action brought me here.

Little did I know that my rural reservation upbringing would challenge me. Generations of my family, as many Natives, grapple with assimilation and integration. Over the years, through social activism and being involved with community, I found myself being the lone Native voice at the table. Firstly, I needed to define my voice, pull apart the childhood lessons with the urgency of being in non-Native spaces, ‘speak when you are spoken to,' 'don’t speak over people when they talk,' 'wait your turn to speak,' et cetera.

Regional and Local Briefs: September 2014
Monday, September 08 2014
 
Written by The Circle Staff,
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NO WRONGDOING FOUND IN TASERING OF 8 YEAR-OLD ROSEBUD CHILD

PIERRE, S.D. – Two months after an 8 year-old girl was tasered by a police officer in October of 2013, the Hughes County State’s Attorney Wendy Kloeppner released a report that stated “she was satisfied with an independent investigation, deploying a taser was the best viable way to diffuse the situation,” and no charges would be filed against the officer or the child.

Attorneys for the family, Dana Hanna and Patrick Duffy, said the acts committed by the police were atrocious and that they do not believe the report accurately reflects what happened.

In October of 2013, four Pierre police officers responded to a 911 call about an 8 year-old girl wielding a knife. The call came from the girl's babysitter, who told the dispatcher the girl was trying to cut herself. According to the police report, the officers were on the scene for just two minutes before tasering the youth.


NUCLEAR COMMISSION DECISION DISAPPOINTS LOCAL LEADERS

RED WING, Minn. – Red Wing city officials and leaders of the Prairie Island Indian Community say they are unhappy with a recent Nuclear Regulatory Commission ruling that does little to resolve the ongoing dispute over storage of spent nuclear fuel.

The Prairie Island nuclear power plant is on the Mississippi River in Red Wing and is adjacent to the Indian community. According to reports, the NRC ruling opens the door for on-site nuclear waste storage for 100 years or more. The language also lifts a suspension on licensing additional nuclear facilities even without the creation of a national repository for nuclear waste.

Ron Johnson, president of the Prairie Island Indian Community's tribal council, said in a statement, "… the NRC affirmed a new rule and generic environmental impact statement that concluded that spent nuclear fuel – some of the most dangerous and toxic substances known to mankind – can be safely stored 600 yards from our homes indefinitely if no geologic repository is ever built. No other community sits as close to a nuclear site and its waste storage."

According to the paper, Xcel Energy says it has "38 casks containing nuclear waste near Red Wing and is permitted to store waste in 64 casks when the current operating licenses end in 2033 and 2034."


National Briefs: September 2014
Monday, September 08 2014
 
Written by The Circle Staff,
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VIDEO CALLS OUT FEDEX FOR WASHINGTON TEAM SPONSORSHIP

PAWHUSKA, Okla. – The Native Voice Network released a video on Sept. 7, urging the courier company FedEx to end its corporate sponsorship of the Washington NFL team. The release was timed to coincide with the team's season opener.

Native Voice Network is a coalition of 25 Native American organizations and commissioned the online Native comedy troupe 1491s' Ryan Redcorn to write and produce the clip titled, “FedEx Fail.”

The video features artist and filmmaker Steven Paul Judd and draws comparisons between racism directed at Native Americans and other ethnicities, Redcorn told media.

NVN spokeswoman Chrissie Castro said what matters most is the mental wellness and stability of Native American children. Castro cited the American Psychological Association’s call to ban Indian mascots on the grounds that such images and language have a negative impact on a Native American child’s self-esteem. "FedEx doesn't think this is a particularly important issue," Castro wrote in a press release. “We do. How can you put a price on our children’s mental health? … We’ve received a lot of negative backlash from proponents of the Washington Team retaining its name. I just have to ask myself, ‘When did America’s pastime become more important than America’s children?’"

September 2014 Calendar
Monday, September 08 2014
 
Written by The Circle Staff,
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Through Nov. 15

On Fertile Ground: Native Artists in the Upper Midwest”

Join us to celebrate the wealth and diversity of Native artists from this region. This exhibition will take place once annually over a period of three years. Each show will highlight 15 different artists, ultimately providing a comprehensive overview of 45 artists from Minnesota, Wisconsin, North Dakota and South Dakota.

2014 artists include: Judith Allen, Wendy Boivin, Alexandra Buffalohead, Julie Buffalohead, Nelson Chasing Hawk, Jim Denomie, John Hitchcock, Wanesia Misquadace, Karen Savage, Nelda Schrupp, James Star Comes Out, Jodi Webster, Dennis White, Jennifer White, and Monte Yellow Bird.

Exhibition Events: Gallery Talk with James Star Comes Out, Oct. 17, 6-7:30 p.m.

All My Relations Gallery, 1414 E. Franklin Ave., Minneapolis, MN. Hours: Tuesday-Friday, 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Saturday-Sunday, 11 a.m.-3 p.m.; Closed Mondays. For more information, call 612-235-4970 or visit www.AllMyRelationsArt.com.


Sept. 9

Circle of Generations Community Staff Building Project

Allen. 2 to 3 p.m.; Minneapolis American Indian Center, 1530 E. Franklin Avenue, Minneapolis, MN. For more information, call Mi-zi-way Mi-gi-zi DesJarlait, Cultural Resource Coordinator at 612-879-1785 or email This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it


Sept. 10

Fare for All Sale

Fare for All is a smart way to save up to 40 percent off fresh fruits, vegetables and frozen meats. We pass on our bulk savings to anyone who wants to stretch their food budget. Fare for All is here in Minneapolis at Little Earth of United Tribes’ Gymnasium one Wednesday per month.

1 to 3 p.m., Little Earth Gym, 2501 Cedar Ave. S., Minneapolis, MN.


Sept. 10

Circle of Generations Teaching Circle

Dakota Language with Neil McKay, 4-5 p.m.; Teaching Circle, 5-7:30 p.m.; Tipi Painting with Endaso Giizhik (Robert Desjarlait); Mazinigwaasowin (Beading) with Angela Kappenman; Nagamowin miinawaa Niimiwin/Wacipi Dowan (Singing and Dancing) with Ringing Shield, Zach RedBear and Alana Dickenson; Community Staff Building Project, Allen.

Minneapolis American Indian Center, 1530 E. Franklin Avenue, Minneapolis, MN. For more information, call Mi-zi-way Mi-gi-zi DesJarlait, Cultural Resource Coordinator at 612-879-1785 or email This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it


Sept. 11

Circle of Generations Ojibwemowin

Ojibwe Language with Joe Spears, 5-6 p.m. Minneapolis American Indian Center, 1530 E. Franklin Avenue, Minneapolis, MN. For more information, call Mi-zi-way Mi-gi-zi DesJarlait, Cultural Resource Coordinator at 612-879-1785 or email This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it


Sept. 12-14

Bob Brown Memorial/Mendota's 15th Annual Traditional Wacipi

Emcee: Mitch Walking Elk; Arena Director: Windy Down Wind; Host Drum: Scotty Brown Eyes; Co-Host Drum: Luttle Thunder Birds; Men's Head Dancer: Nick Anderson; Women's Head DancerL Mary So Happy.

Friday: Lighting the Sacred Fire, followed by potluck dinner, 5:05 p.m. Saturday: Dancer registration, 11 a.m.; Grand Entry/Honored Guests, 1 p.m.; dancer registration, 5 p.m.; Grand Entry/Honored Guests; Registered dancers payout, 8:45 p.m. Sunday: Dancer registration, 11 a.m.; Grand Entry/Honored Guests, 1 p.m.; Closing Ceremony and Feast, 5:30 p.m.; Registered dancer payout, 5 p.m.

This is a traditional wacipi, not a competition. Sponsored by the Mendota Mdewakanton Dakota Community. Giveaway and donations needed and appreciated. $5 entry button donation, no one turned away. No drugs, alcohol, firearms or pets allowed.

St. Peter's Church Grounds, 1405 Sibley Memorial Highway, Mendota, MN. For more information, call 651-452-4141, email This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it or visit www.mendotadakota.com.

 

Sept. 13
11th Annual Wild Rice Festival

Wild Rice Pancake Breakfast, 8 to 11 a.m.; Food Concessions by Pow Wow Grounds, noon-4 p.m.; Free entertainment and activities, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Harriet Alexander Nature Center, 2520 N. Dale St., Roseville, MN 55113.
For more information, call 651-765-4262 or visit www.WildRiceFestival.org.

 

Sept. 13

NorthPoint Health & Wellness Center 3rd Annual Fit-4-Fun Family Fitness Event
This on site event will include a family oriented one- or three-mile walk or run. Other events include a neighborhood bike ride, aerobics, music, dancing, prizes, healthy food options, health and wellness information, and most importantly fun.

10 a.m., NorthPoint Health & Wellness Center, 1313 Penn Ave. N., Minneapolis, MN. For more information, call Tanya Williams at 612-543-2560.


Sept. 13

Gathering in Winona Traditional Powwow

One day with day money for all dancers. Dance specials in adult men and women’s traditional, adult men and women’s fancy, adult men’s grass and adult women’s jingle. Guimaraes-DeCora Family Ho-Chunk Women’s Applique Special, 18 and older. First prize: $300; second prize: $200; third prize: $100; fourth prize: $50. Invited drums only. Camping available, vendors on site.

Grand Entry, 1 and 7 p.m. Unity Park, Winona, MN (off Hwy 43). For more information, call Valerie DeCora Guimaraes at 507-289-7401 or email This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it

What's New In the Community: September 2014
Monday, September 08 2014
 
Written by The Circle Staff,
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AMERICAN INDIAN CANCER FOUNDATION ANNOUNCES NEW BOARD MEMBERS

The American Indian Cancer Foundation, a national nonprofit committed to eliminating cancer and its impact on American Indian families, announced the new members that will join its board of directors in October 2014: Andrew Adams III, JD (Muscogee Nation), Bret R. Benally Thompson, MD (White Earth Ojibwe), Mary Fairbanks, DNP (White Earth Ojibwe), Mark Fox, JD (Mandan Hidatsa Arikara Nations), Margo Gray (Osage Nation), Samuel A. Moose, MTAG (Mille Lacs Band of Ojibwe) and Kalina Newmark (Sahtu Dene First Nations).

These individuals bring an impressive set of energy, passion, partnerships and skills to the board that will help the foundation advance its mission. In addition to their service with the American Indian Cancer Foundation, the new members serve in many professional and volunteer capacities devoted to improving and strengthening American Indian communities.

The AICAF Board of Directors is made up of 12 American Indian leaders from across the United States. The seven founding board of directors who successfully launched this foundation have served their maximum terms. The current board of directors led the process to identify and elect new board members to join the AICAF board of directors and guide the next phase of the organization’s development.

“We are so honored to welcome the new additions to the American Indian Cancer Foundation Board of Directors. Their individual and combined dedication and service to serving American Indian communities are well known and respected across the nation. Their drive is just what we need as we work to expand our capacity to address cancer issues in American Indian communities across the country” said Kristine Rhodes, executive director of the American Indian Cancer Foundation.

The U.S. has celebrated declining rates of cancer mortality over the past two decades, yet American Indians face increasing cancer mortality compared to other populations.

Today, many American Indians face alarming inequities in cancer incidence and mortality. Cancer rates vary by tribe, region, and gender. But according to a 2014 American Journal of Public Health special issue, cancer is now the No. 1 cause of death for American Indian men and women in many states and for all American Indian women in the United States.

The American Indian Cancer Foundation (AICAF) is a 501(c)3 nonprofit organization established to address the tremendous cancer burden faced by American Indians. Its mission is to eliminate the cancer burdens on American Indian families through education, prevention, early detection, treatment and survivor support. AICAF supports transformational interventions that engage communities in the discovery of best practices. AICAF believes that communities possess the wisdom to discover the solutions to effectively address challenges but are often looking for resources and support. The American Indian Cancer Foundation strives to be a partner trusted by tribes and organizations working toward effective and sustainable cancer solutions.

For more information, visit www.AmericanIndianCancer.org.

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