subscribe_today.png

 
Local Briefs
What's New In the Community: July 2014
Monday, July 07 2014
 
Written by The Circle Staff,
Average user rating    (0 vote)

TIWAHE FOUNDATION ANNOUNCES GRANT RECIPIENTS

 

The Tiwahe Foundation is honored to announce that at its June 10 board meeting, 15 grants were awarded to Native American individuals in the Twin Cities seven county metro area through its American Indian Family Empowerment Program Fund. This program awards $70,000-$80,000 annually to American Indian individuals and families seeking financial resources to achieve their goals, shape their future and make positive contributions to their community through three priority areas: Economic Self-sufficiency; Education and Cultural Connections.

Grants range from $500 to $2,500, enough to make a significant impact on grantees and the community and contributing to the self-determination of individuals. Individuals received awards in the following focus areas:

Goal 1: Preserving and Renewing Native Cultural Connections (Learning Native languages, developing kinship ties, traditional and cultural practices). The grantees include: Nancy Cain-Kouri, Melissa Davis and Cleone Thompson.

Goal 2: Educational Achievement (Expenses related to college degrees, certificates, vocational training, GED, and college entrance exams). Grantees for this goal were: Travis Earth-Werner, Savanna Elmquist, John Fairbanks, Miigis Gonzalez, Kevin Head, Mia Mikel, Cynthia Pawlitschek, James Smith, Shantelle Stately, Kelly Suzick and Aaron Thomson.

Linda Lucero was the grantee for Goal 3, which includes economic self-sufficiency through employment, business, entrepreneurial opportunities and expenses related to home-ownership.

AIFEP strives to reverse the social, educational, and economic challenges facing American Indians by investing in human capital, skills, resources and cultural strengths that people possess that allow them to live healthy and productive lives, build strong relationships, and make meaningful contributions to their communities. To learn more, visit www.tiwahefoundation.org.

Regional and Local Briefs: July 2014
Monday, July 07 2014
 
Written by The Circle Staff,
Average user rating    (0 vote)

OGLALA SIOUX TRIBAL COUNCIL SUSPENDS PRESIDENT

PINE RIDGE, S.D. – The Oglala Sioux Tribal Council suspended President Bryan Brewer following allegations that he acted without the council's approval on two occasions and mishandled a $5,000 check.

The council voted 10-5 on June 24 to suspend Brewer until July 17, when a hearing is scheduled to determine whether he should be reinstated or impeached, Councilman Garfield Steele said. Brewer will be given an opportunity to defend himself at the hearing.

"I support the president," Steele said. "I support a lot of things that he's done. He's done good things and the reason why I voted to accept this was to allow him to give his side of the story."

Steele said the complaints against Brewer allege that he signed over the tribe's power of attorney in order to approve bonds without the council's consent, that he approved health benefits for the tribe's former casino manager without the council's consent, and that he mishandled a $5,000 donation a business made to the tribe. Steele did not say what Brewer is alleged to have done with the money.

A tribal judge will oversee the July 17 hearing, with the eventual decision on Brewer's future left to the council. It would take a two-thirds vote of the 19-member council to remove Brewer from office.

National Briefs: July 2014
Monday, July 07 2014
 
Written by The Circle Staff,
Average user rating    (0 vote)

PATENT OFFICE CANCELS WASHINGTON TEAM'S TRADEMARK

WASHINGTON – The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office canceled six trademarks belonging to the Washington football team on June 18, saying they are offensive to Native Americans.

The team, which has said it has spent millions defending trademark over the years, will appeal the decision, a process that could take years. The Patent Office will continue to treat the trademark registrations as though they are valid during the appeals process, according to a spokesperson.

In the meantime, the team can continue to use the logos portraying a Native American profile with feathers. If the decision is upheld, it will be hard for the team to claim ownership of its brand, a crucial step in going after the makers of unlicensed merchandise. Instead, the team will have to illustrate that it has always used the logos, rather than relying official trademark registrations. The decision came in response to a suit brought by five Native plaintiffs.

In May, 49 senators, including Majority Leader Harry Reid, signed a letter to NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell saying that the "team is on the wrong side of history," and that he should endorse a name change. A week later, a coalition of 77 tribal, civil rights and religious groups, including the National Congress of American Indians and the NAACP, signed a letter urging players to campaign to change the team's mascot.

The team adopted its name and logo in 1933, when it was based in Boston. It had been known as the Braves but changed the name to honor William Henry "Lone Star" Dietz, their coach at the time, who was a Native American, according to a legal brief filed by the team in a previous matter.

The trademark, which was granted in 1967, has been renewed several times, but the Patent Office previously canceled the registration in 1999. A federal judge overturned that decision in 2003, saying there was no proof that the name was disparaging at the time of registration. The team's trademark attorney Bob Raskopf said he believed this decision, like the previous one, would be overturned.

Passing On: Cheryl Gresczyk
Monday, July 07 2014
 
Written by The Circle Staff,
Average user rating    (0 vote)

cheryl gresczyk.jpgCheryl Elizabeth Joyce Geshick Gresczyk

October 10, 1945- June 24, 2014

Cheryl, whose Ojibwe name is Aabitaagiizhigookwe (Half Way to the Sky Woman), 68, of Eden Prairie, MN, entered into the spirt world around midnight on June 24. She had diabetes, lung cancer and heart issues.

Funeral services were held on June 27 at 7 p.m. at Gichitwaa Kateri Parish at 3045 Park in Minneapolis with a funeral Mass on June 28. Burial was held at Immaculate Conception Cemetery in Wright, MN, near the cabin, followed by a gathering and a meal at the cabin. Fr. Jim Notebaart and Fr. Mike Tegeder were two of the celebrants.

Cheryl was born October 10, 1945, in Minneapolis, Minnesota, the daughter of Joseph Geshick and Rose (Marsh) Geshick. Cheryl was a full-blood Anishinaabekwe (Ojibwe) from Bois Forte Reservation. She married Rick Gresczyk on April 6, 1974. She received her bachelor of science degree in Education from the University of Minnesota and her master's degree from St. Thomas College. She was involved with teaching and youth work all of her working years. She and Rick helped start the Office of Indian Ministry and Gichitwaa Kateri Parish in Minneapolis.

She is survived by three sons, Rick Jr. (Nicole) of Oakdale, MN, Rodger (Annie) of Watertown, MN and Randy (Nichole) of New Brighton, MN.

They have three more children adopted in the Ojibwe way. They are Theresa Morrison (Pragedis Castillo) of Eagan, MN, Melvin Brazil-Geyshick (Suzie) of Thief River Falls, MN, and Yoku Aso (Megumi) of Kumamoto, Japan.

Rick and Cheryl were foster parents for many years for Hennepin County and very active in the American Indian community of the Twin Cities. She enjoyed being a loving wife, mother, and grandmother. She enjoyed cards, crossword puzzles, TV, and pets, most recently Waabooz, their poodle. She has two brothers, Joe and Ernie. She has several adopted sisters, Gaye Hallberg of Bloomington, MN, Pat Northrup of Sawyer, MN, and Shirley Krogmeier of Holyoke, CO. She is preceded in death by her parents and several siblings. Her sister, Virginia, was very close to her.

Casketbearers were Leonard Geshick, Randy and Elias White, William BigBear, Jr, Pragedis Castillo and Yoku Aso.

From the Editor's Desk: Privilege Isn't What You Think
Monday, July 07 2014
 
Written by Alfred Walking Bull, The Circle Managing Editor,
Average user rating    (0 vote)
whats_new_-_walfred_walking_bull.jpgThe concept of privilege is one that's both acknowledged and dismissed, depending on which side of cultural identity one hangs one's hat.

For many in the Native American community, both on the reservation and in the urban setting, privilege is something that we see as the cause of our oppression. It's a catch-all for the discrimination we face individually and collectively. Growing up in rural South Dakota, my parents and I were followed around in retail stores in Rapid City, Pierre and Sioux Falls. As tribal nations, we are not consulted in a meaningful way on environmental, legal and cultural issues by governmental powers that have made treaties, compacts with us and exercise authority over us.

For non-Natives, the concept of privilege is one that is easily dusted off shoulders with the argument that they – personally – have done nothing to Natives that damage us individually and collectively. And for the most part, they are entirely correct. Most of the time, the privilege that most of us fight are the privileges of class and economics. However, those privileges do tend to follow color lines, arbitrary as they may seem in this modern age.

Pipelines that cross Anishinaabe, Dakota, Lakota, Apsáalooke and Assiniboine territory – if approved, constructed and expanded – will ultimately make a profit for the multinational corporations that build them and for the fossil fuel industry that will transport through them. Unfortunately, for those tribal citizens who live with the reality of those pipelines in their sacred ground, little to no profit will be seen and even if it is, it will be little comfort when water becomes undrinkable and land becomes sterile from the inevitable spills that do and will happen.

<< Start < Prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Next > End >>

Results 41 - 60 of 755

Ads

circlead.png

 

 

the_circle_160x550.png

Sponsors

logo spot_color - copy.jpg bald_eagle_erectors_web_size.jpg

pcl_leaders_web_size.jpg

api_supply_lifts_web_size.jpg

 

 

eagle_visions.jpg