subscribe_today.png

 
Local Briefs
LaDuke: Putting Our Minds Together
Monday, July 07 2014
 
Written by Winona LaDuke,
Average user rating    (0 vote)
I like that President Obama traveled to see Sitting Bull’s people at the Standing Rock Reservation [in June]. He is the third sitting president to visit a reservation. After all, our ancestors signed treaties with your ancestors and great nations should reaffirm these relationships for our common good, as should we as people.

There were some strong words said by many. Those words were in Lakota as well as English. Eyapaha Chase Iron Eyes, of Standing Rock, had some very interesting things to say. An attorney, as well as a traditional representative, Iron Eyes talked with depth about many issues which are skirted in the media. Iron Eyes talked about the l868 treaty, a treaty of peace between the Lakota Nation and the U.S., which reserved large parts of the Dakotas for the Lakota nation. The treaty has been violated, and the US Courts have upheld that the land was illegally taken, with a huge payment offered for the Lakota – now amounting to around a billion dollars. It sits in the bank, because the Lakota still believe in the treaty and their land.

“We have a Creator given right to live, die and be buried in our sacred Black Hills,” Iron Eyes told Obama, reflecting the continuing position of the Lakota people, that the Black Hills needs to be returned and suggests, that” a practical solution,” can be found. For instance, co-management, transitioning to Lakota management of the millions of acres of national and state parks in the Black Hills region would be a good step. (Remember that Lakota and Mandans like Gerard Butler, former superintendent of Mount Rushmore National Park and now supervisor at the Badlands National Park, have some experience). And, also remember, that the Lakota have thousands of years of management experience in the area. “The U.S. did not give the Sioux nation any rights,” Iron Eyes said, “We reserved to ourselves specific rights. We never gave up the right to govern ourselves and to exist under our spiritual instructions in our territory.”

Hennepin Theatre Trust Celebrates Andrew Jackson in Musical
Monday, July 07 2014
 
Written by Alfred Walking Bull,
Average user rating    (0 vote)
web-hennepin theatre trust celebrates andrew jackson in musical 1.jpgArt imitated life after a June 19 performance of “Bloody Bloody Andrew Jackson,” a production of the Hennepin Theatre Trust that portrays the exploits of the U.S. president responsible for the Trail of Tears.

In the run up to the performance, New Native Theatre's Rhiana Yazzie organized a protest of the musical after she wrote an open letter about the play. In the letter, she decried the organization's choice of subject matter, “I think it was an unfortunate choice for Minneapolis Musical Theatre to produce this play and I have no doubt they played into the same disconnect the authors did, not considering the effect it could have on real people or that Native Americans might actually be audience members.”

In the production, references to Native American culture included the joke, “Tell me what's the difference between a little homosexual Indian boy and George Washington? Besides the fact you'd murder either of them without thinking twice?" In addition, Yazzie objected to the fact that Native characters were portrayed by non-Native actors who were written as stoic and speaking in a halting manner. Additional references to Native culture included the character of Andrew Jackson (played by Philip C. Matthews), disparaging Native art and music with a declarative, “Your music sucks.”

Native Parents Demand Change in St. Paul School Program
Monday, July 07 2014
 
Written by Sheila Regan, TC Daily Planet,
Average user rating    (0 vote)
native parents demand change in st paul school program.jpgRecent controversies within the St. Paul American Indian community over programs associated with St. Paul Public Schools have led to the director of the SPPS American Indian Education program requesting a reassignment within the district. Questions about the future of the program continue. Among the controversies: adoption of former director Rosemary White Shield’s proposed New Day model, staff restructuring and criticism of how elections of the two Indian Education Parent Committees were conducted. The recent controversies add to ongoing criticism that Indian Ed fails to serve all Native students adequately and that Native students continue to be affected by the achievement gap.

Indian education programming in SPPS can be confusing and complex. Multiple programs, two separate parent committees, reflect a complicated history, diverse funding streams and tangled administrative paths.

According to the SPPS Web site, the American Indian Education Program provides services for any American Indian students who are enrolled members of a tribe, band or other organized group, including Alaskan Native. The program also may provide services to any student who is a child or grandchild of an enrolled member.

The Indian Wars Are Not Over
Monday, July 07 2014
 
Written by Winona LaDuke,
Average user rating    (0 vote)
web-the indian wars are not over 1.jpgOn an overcast, and quiet midday afternoon, 50 or so Anishinaabeg from ricing families and their friends gathered at Big Bear Landing on the shore of Big Rice Lake. It is 138 years to the day of the infamous Battle of the Little Big Horn.

Some would say that the odds were not great for the Lakota at that point and some might say the same now, for the Anishinaabeg. The Ojibwe hold ricing poles, knockers and carry their canoes to the lake, carefully placing them on the edge. Michael Dahl, has called us together to talk about our manoomin, our wild rice and this lake. This lake is the most bountiful wild rice lake in Minnesota – four miles long and two miles wide. A solid bed of wild rice on a good year. There is nothing like it. Really.

It’s an epic moment. The newest version of the Indian Wars is coming towards Rice Lake. This Seventh Cavalry incarnation is a set of fossil fuel and extractive mining proposals, capped by some pipelines – big ones headed every which way across the heart of Indian Country. Kinder Morgan and Enbridge Gateway to the North in what is called British Columbia and into the Salish Sea, Energy East projected to go from West to East to Miq’Mac territory the Keystone XL, Alberta Clipper, Line 9 and the Sandpiper, are all intended to move fossil fuels – fracked oil and tar sands oil across some territories, which have no pipelines.

It Ain't Easy Being Indian
Monday, June 09 2014
 
Written by Ricey Wild,
Average user rating    (0 vote)
ricey wild.jpgMy dear readers it must be very obvious that I love to laugh tell stories and joke and tease. I love other people who do that too and it is they whom I seek and I ignore the haters. This is my world and I get to say who’s in it. That being said there are times that intrude on my contentedness like that awful Lone Ranger movie starring Johnny Depp. At these times I have to reach back to my own memories of being terrorized in every way by the colonials’ descendants.

I’m writing specifically about the recent backlash against rapper Emerson Windy and his “song” and video of him in dressed in redface, eagle headdress and all rapping about “smoking that weed” and using a peace pipe to do it. To be fair, which I try to do even in the face of my extreme disgust at the video, which even used actual pow wow footage in psychedelic graphics. I watched the video of his apology on the Facebook page petition to make him take that disgusting video down.

<< Start < Prev 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 Next > End >>

Results 501 - 520 of 1209

****SPONSORS

bald_eagle_erectors_web_size.jpg  bsbc_ccs_online_logo.jpg
common_bonds_howard_lake_2.jpg commonbondsoct1.jpgcommonbondsoct2.jpg

commonbondsoct3.jpg