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The Arts
Book Review: Northrup has outdone himself in Anishinaabe Syndicated
Tuesday, April 12 2011
 
Written by Jacob Croonenberghs,
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Anishinaabe Syndicated: A View from
the Rez
By Jim Northrup  
Introduction by Margaret Noori  Ph.D.
Paperback, 248 pages
Publisher: Minnesota Historical Society Published January 1, 2011

arts_story_northrup_bookJim Northrup is somewhat of a folk hero; he tells the stories Natives want to hear from the press, from politics, and from the reservation. He is a remarkable man: story teller, BS'er, poet and performer. He is a character worth reading about and a columnist we recognize. His latest book, Anishiinaabe Syndicated: A View from the Rez, is the third of his autobiographical novels and a thrilling look into the past; a personal history from the viewpoint of reservation life.
From the front lines of fighting for spearfishing rights to the recounting of 9/11, a day he'll never forget (though the story may not be as you might expect), Northrup tells an elder's tale of current events intermingled with personal ponderings between the years of 1990 to 2001.
Northrup is an award-winning Native American author. His column, Fond du Lac Follies, earned the best column of the year in 1999 from the Native American Journalists Association and gave Northrup the writer of the year award in 2001 from the Wordcraft Circle of Native Writer's and Storytellers.
Northrup has written for a number of anthologies and penned the books Walking the Rez Road (awarded a Minnesota Book Award as well as Northeast Minnesota Book Award) and Rez Road Follies: Canoes, Casinos, Computers and Birch Bark Baskets (nominated for the Minnesota Book Award).
Now we have a collection of some of Northrup's best reports from the 'rez, as he calls his home, the Fond Du Lac reservation. The results of his writing are at the same time nostalgic and sarcastic, insightful and irreverent as Northrup asks us to question the world we live in.
As Northrup puts it, "I've heard many questions over the years as I have travelled... people's questions are sometimes silly, sometimes dumb, sometimes cruel. I respond in kind."
"Dakota 38" documetary remembers the 38 Dakota executed in 1862
Friday, February 11 2011
 
Written by Mark Steil Minnesota Public Radio News,
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dakota 38 documentaryThe largest mass execution in U.S. history occurred 148 years ago, when 38 Dakota warriors were hanged from a single scaffold in Mankato.
 The shock waves of that mass execution still reverberate today among the Dakota people. A new documentary film remembers the 38, and also a group of Dakota who ride on horseback each year at this time to Mankato to commemorate the executions of Dec. 26, 1862.
 The U.S.-Dakota War played out along several all too familiar themes of U.S. history: broken treaties and unfulfilled promises. The war started in August of 1862 and when it was over six weeks later, hundreds of Indians, settlers and soldiers were dead along the Minnesota River valley.
 Filmmaker Silas Hagerty said his introduction to the war came five years ago. At a traditional sweat lodge ceremony, an Indian spiritual leader told Haggerty about his dream.
"Dakota Music Tour" will feature Native composers/musicians and the Mankato Symphony Orchestra
Thursday, January 13 2011
 
Written by The Circle Staff,
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"Dakota Music Tour" – a 90-minute musical response to the Dakota-American events of 1862 in Minnesota – will feature four concerts that will reach out to Dakota and non-Dakota communities in southern Minnesota.
The tour will begin in Mankato, Minnesota, which was the site of the largest mass execution in American history when 38 Dakota men were hung on December 26, 1862.

This Is Displacement showcases a range of contemporary Native artists
Thursday, January 13 2011
 
Written by The Circle staff,
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THIS IS DISPLACEMENT: Native Art Show Opens January. 9th
Plymouth Congregational Church
Public reception: January 24 at 6 p.m.
 
Plymouth Congregational Church, 1900 Nicollet Ave. (at Franklin) in Minneapolis, is exhibiting  the Native art show “This is Displacement: Native Artists Consider the Relationship Between Land & Identity,” in its Howard Conn Fine Arts Center Gallery.this is displacement native american
Curated by Emily Johnson (Yup’ik) and Carolyn Lee Anderson (Diné) “This is Displacement: Native Artists Consider the Relationship Between Land & Identity” is a group exhibit by a range of contemporary Native artists that consider what displacement from Native homelands means to their identity and their work.  
The exhibit features two and three-dimensional art, short films/video, recorded sound art (music/stories/sound collage) and written work.
As curators, Johnson and Anderson chose to define displacement broadly, not just as a negative outside force but also as an intense connection to a place other than one’s homeland. The group art exhibit offers audiences multiple Native views of displacement, and encourages a dialogue with the audience on the intersections of art and identity.
Co-curator Anderson, a painter, states, “I am curating this exhibit because displacement is an especially challenging issue in my life. I was born and raised in Minnesota, but my maternal heritage is Diné (Navajo). I feel at home here in Minnesota, but I also have an intense longing to be in the Southwest and learn about my culture and language. It’s as if half of my heart is here in Minnesota, and the other half is in Dinétah.” 


Native performing arts groups formed to advocate inclusion
Friday, October 15 2010
 
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Concerned over a lack of voice and inclusion a group of prominent American Indian writers, directors and performers has joined together to form two new organizations that will promote and advocate for greater visibility and a stronger presence within the American mainstream theater industry. Tribal two new organizations are called the National American Indian Theater and Performing Arts Alliance and the American Indian Playwrights Guild.
“The American Indian community in America possesses an amazing roster of creative talents, particularly in theater and the performing arts,” said Hanay Geiogamah, a playwright-director and founder of Project HOOP, the national American Indian theater and performing arts advocacy program located at the University of California in Los Angeles.
“We feel strongly that it is time American Indian people take full and complete control of ours stories and images in all theater and performing arts initiatives,” Geiogamah said. “These two organizations will also create leverage for fundraising in an effort to provide critical support for American Indian artists and theater and performing arts organizations.”
Mark Anthony Rolo, a Bad River Ojibwe playwright and University of Wisconsin-Madison lecturer, said the Playwrights Guild will help American Indian dramatists in protecting and promoting the artistic and financial value of their work.
“We want the mainstream theaters and funders to understand and recognize that our playwrights are the original, creative source of American Indian theater,” Rolo said. “The works they produce give voice to tribal communities and tribal people in all parts of the country, and we want the theater industry and funders to support our work.”
The Playwrights Guild would serve Indian playwrights similar to the national New York-based Dramatists Guild, which represents a wide array of American dramatists. Geiogamah said that the organizations will develop programs and services that will help strengthen and promote the work of American Indian theaters, performing arts groups and related groups in tribal communities across the nation.
“An important goal of the Alliance will be to promote a larger pubic appreciation and understanding of American Indian theater and the related performing arts. The Alliance will also promote, support and honor artistic talent and accomplishments,” Geiogamah said.
A who’s who of prominent American Indian theater artists joined in the founding session for the new organizations, including leading playwrights: Bruce King, Oneida-Ojibwe author of the acclaimed Evening at the Warbonnet; William YellowRobe Jr., Assiniboine Sioux, whose work includes the well-known drama Grandchildren of the Buffalo Soldiers; Marcie Rendon, White Earth Anishinabe playwright based in Minneapolis and author of Songcatcher; Dianne Yeahquo Reyner, Kiowa tribal member who is the artistic director of the Kansas City-based American Indian Repertory Theater and author of Weaving the Rain, as well as Geiogamah and Rolo.
Geiogamah’s plays include Body Indian and Foghorn. Rolo’s works include What’s An Indian Woman to Do? and The Way Down Story.
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