subscribe_today.png

 
What's New in The Community


June What's New in the Community
Thursday, June 01 2017
 
Written by The Circle,
Average user rating    (0 vote)

Grand Opening Held for New Redby Community Center

redlakecenter.jpg

(By Michael Meuers) – The new Redby Community on the Red Lake Indian Reservation held a ribbon-cutting ceremony for the new Community Center on May 23. Even though the center is officially open, there is still more work to be done, including adding artwork to the exterior, a playground, and landscaping. Redby’s Community Center is the third center to open thus far. The fourth and final community center will be located at Red Lake. The Shakopee Mdewakanton Sioux Community provided funds for the large gym.

Artists selected for Bde Maka Ska public art project

The Minneapolis Park and Recreation Board and the City of Minneapolis’ Art in Public Places program are collaborating on a public art project in conjunction with construction improvements for Bde Maka Ska. The project focuses on creating a gathering space and public art to honor Mahpiya Wicasta/Cloud Man, and celebrate the history of Heyata Otunwe, a village located on Bde Maka Ska from 1829-1839.

The project was selected by a panel comprised of community members, arts and architecture professionals and the project’s design team. Artists will be working with the project design team on concepts which will be shared with the public in fall 2017. Selected artists include:
• Angela Two Stars (Sisseton Wahpeton Sioux) is a graduate of Kendall College of Art and Design in Grand Rapids, MI with a BFA in Drawing and Printmaking.
• Mona Smith is a visual and multimedia artist of Dakota heritage, co-founder of Healing Place Collaborative, and owner of Allies: Media/Art.
• Sandy Spieler is a visual artist, and founder and director of the annual May Day Parade and Ceremony at Powderhorn Park.

National Sports Center to create new basketball event: Native American Basketball Games

The Minnesota Amateur Sports Commission (MASC) and the National Sports Center (NSC) will create a new basketball tournament that will bring together basketball teams from Native American tribes.

The first annual Native American Basketball Games will be held October 19-22, 2017 at Cass Lake-Bena High School in Cass Lake, Minn. The tournament will be open to 12U, 14U and 18U boys’ and girls’ teams. Players must be Native American, with proof of tribal membership.
Tournament director George Ellis thinks about 25-30 teams will play in the inaugural event. He expects most of the teams will come from Minnesota and the Dakotas, although Ellis is attending the North American Indigenous Games this June in Toronto, and hopes to attract teams from a wider circle after recruiting at that event. The event welcomes teams from all over the US and Canada.

Plans also include a free youth basketball clinic and powow. For more info, see: www.nscsports.org/nativebasketballgames .

$15,000 grant for White Earth Food Sovereignty Assessment

Ogema Organics has received a $15,000 grant from the First Nations Development Institute of Longmont, Colorado. The award will support their White Earth Food Sovereignty Assessment, which will be instrumental in providing critical data of community health and economic needs of tribal membership within th boundaries of the reservation.

The grant will support food sovereignty within the White Earth Reservation through the collection of community information, building transparency, strengthening ties, and targeting community health and economic needs, and ultimately encouraging health and well-being in all aspects of life on the reservation. For more info, see: OgemaOrganics.wordpress.com.


May What's New in the Community
Tuesday, May 09 2017
 
Written by The Circle,
Average user rating    (0 vote)

NACF Mentor Artist Fellowship winners

The Native Arts and Cultures Foundation (NACF) has awarded its first Mentor Artist Fellowship to 12 artists in three regions of the United States: the Pacific Northwest, Southwest and Upper Midwest. The awardees reside in Alaska, Arizona, Minnesota, New Mexico, Oregon, Washington and Wisconsin. Beginning in July, each artist will mentor an emerging American Indian or Alaska Native artist apprentice for one year.

The awardees are accomplished Native artists of 10 years or more in Traditional Arts or Contemporary Visual Arts, and are enrolled in an American Indian tribe or Alaska Native corporation. The Fellowship includes a monetary award of $30,000 per artist for a total of $360,000 awarded in fellowships.

Midwest artists who were awarded Fellowships include:
In Contemporary Visual Arts: Dyani White Hawk, Sicangu Lakota, mixed media. In Traditional Arts: Wayne Valliere, Lac du Flambeau Ojibwe, birch bark canoe making; and Delina White, Leech Lake Ojibwe, regalia/apparel, accessory making.

The Native Arts and Cultures Foundation’s mission is to promote the revitalization, appreciation and perpetuation of American Indian, Alaska Native and Native Hawaiian arts and cultures through grant making, convening and advocacy. NACF has supported a total of 251 awards for Native artists, organizations, and advocacy efforts in more than 30 states and the District of Columbia. For info about the Fellows, visit: www.nativeartsandcultures.org.

NAP announces first round of #GenIndigenous Response Fund  

Native Americans in Philanthropy (NAP) has announced the first round of #GenIndigenous Response Fund grantees. The Fund provides grants to selected groups of up to $5,000. Grant focus on strategic communications, education, workforce development, juvenile justice, resiliency, traditional knowledge, sustainability, environmental justice, health, and trauma and healing. The #GenIndigenous Response Fund was established in December 2016 in support of youth organizing and activism responding to current movements.

Grantees include Coalition to Stop Violence Against Native Women, Dream of Wild Health , Little Colorado River Watershed Chapters Association, Lummi Youth Canoe Family, Native Nations Institute, Nature Rights Council, Sacred Pipe Resource Center, Selfridge High School Student Government & Missouri River Education Cooperative collaboration, Standing Rock Community High School Close Up program and Spark*San Francisco Public Schools.
For info, see: www.nativephilanthropy.org for more information.

Leech Lake competing in U.S. Dept. of Energy solar challenge

Leech Lake Financial Services has been selected to participate in the Solar in Your Community Challenge from the United States Department of Energy. The challenge includes a prize of $5 million and is a competition’s goal to expand solar electricity access to low and moderate income families.

Over the next 18 months, Leech Lake’s Team Wasaya (Power of the sunshine in Ojibwe) will be researching and developing innovative approaches that enable low and moderate income families, non-profits and non-federal governments in Leech Lake and Cass Lake to access solar power. The Leech Lake team is comprised of multiple agencies including tribal, state, county and city as well as educational programs, financial foundations and other private sector members.

Mystic Lake and Little Six Casinos receive award for responsible alcohol training program

 The Shakopee Mdewakanton Sioux Community Gaming Enterprise, which includes Mystic Lake Casino Hotel and Little Six Casino, has been awarded the 2017 TIPS Award of Excellence from Health Communications, Inc., the providers of the TIPS (Training for Intervention ProcedureS) Program. Since 2012, Mystic Lake and Little Six have provided the TIPS responsible alcohol training program to team members, helping them build positive prevention and intervention skills.

The SMSC Gaming Enterprise is one of four award recipients nationally in the casino and gaming category for its successful TIPS responsible alcohol training program. Since the SMSC Gaming Enterprise began using the TIPS program, it has provided 473 classes and certified 3,380 team members. Eight Gaming Enterprise staff are currently certified TIPS program trainers.

Leech Lake received DOT grant

The Leech Lake Band of Ojibwe has been awarded more than $900,000 from the Department of Transportation to improve tribal roads.

The $950,175 grant will address transportation safety issues on tribal lands, and will be put toward safety planning, engineering improvements, enforcement and emergency services and education for tribal communities.


April What's New in the Community
Tuesday, April 04 2017
 
Written by The Circle,
Average user rating    (0 vote)

Five Natives selected for Bush Fellowships

Five Native Americans were named 2017 Bush Fellows. In total, twenty-four  leaders were chosen for their records of achievement and their potential to make significant contributions in Minn., No. Dakota, So. Dakota and 23 Native Nations.

• Melissa Boyd (Mille Lacs Indian Reservation, MN) will finish her bachelor degree in elementary education, complete a certificate of contemporary indigenous multilingualism at the University of Hawaii and study behavior design through Stanford School of Medicine.

• Heather Dawn Thompson (Rapid City, SD) will pursue corporate finance training, combining it with a focus on Lakota values of leadership, language and self-sufficiency.

• Vaughn Vargas (Rapid City, SD) will develop new methods to recruit and retain Native American police officers.

• Karina Perkins (Robbinsdale, MN) will build the leadership skills necessary to champion a systemic change to treat addiction with a disease management approach.

• Tomi Phillips (Fort Yates, ND) will pursue a doctorate degree in educational leadership.

The Bush Fellowship provides people with up to $100,000 over 12 to 24 months to pursue learning experiences that help them develop leadership skills and attributes. For more info, see: www.bushfoundation.org/fellowships/bush-fellowship .

 

Heid Erdrich wins McKnight Artist Fellowship

The Loft Literary Center announced the winners of the 2017 McKnight Artist Fellowships for Writers, Loft Awards in Creative Prose and Loft Award in Children’s Literature.  Heid E. Erdrich (Turtle Mountain Ojibwe) was one of the recpients of the creative proses writers’ award.

Erdrich is the author of the memoir-in-recipes Original Local, which tells indigenous foods stories from her family and from tribes in the Upper Midwest. An interdisciplinary artist, she regularly publishes nonfiction essays and collaborates to create performances and poem films as well as prose on visual artists. Erdrich has authored five collections of poetry.  She is working on a book of short prose and cross-genre writing on race, art, and Native Nations.  

The McKnight Artist Fellowships for Writers provide Minnesota writers of demonstrated ability with an opportunity to work on their writing for a concentrated period of time. For more info, see: www.mcknight.org/grant-programs/arts/artist-fellowships .

 

Louise Erdrich’s LaRose Wins National Book Critics Circle Award

Louise Erdrich has won the 2017 National Book Critics Circle Award in fiction for her 15th novel, “LaRose,”. This is the second time the Minneapolis author has won the NBCC award. Her debut novel, “Love Medicine,” won in 1984.

Erdrich said about the award. “I’d like to thank my mother, a strong Native woman. And my 91-year-old father, the son of immigrants. We are all in this together. It is so important right now, as truth is being assaulted not just in this country, but all over the world. Let us dig into the truth. Let us be fierce and dangerous about the truth.”

 

AIFEP annouces awardees

Eleven grants were awarded to Native American individuals in Minnesota through Tiwahe Foundation’s American Indian Family Empowerment Program Fund (AIFEP) from its January grant round.

In the Economic Self-Sufficiency category: 
David Bernie’s grant will help him take his Indigemojis into the Android market (see cover story). And Benjamin Spears’ (Red Lake Ojibwe) grant  will assist in upgrading business equipment for Spears Tree Care of Bloomington.

In the Educational Achievement category:
Brittany Austin (Standing Rock Sioux) will pursue an associate’s degree in Education at Minneapolis Community and Technical College; Jolene Chestnut (White Earth Ojibwe) is pursuing a Master of Tribal Administration and Governance at the University of Minnesota-Duluth; Akikwe Cornell (Sault Sainte Marie) is completing a doctorate in American Studies at the University of Minnesota; Honor Lamont (Oglala Lakota) will pursue an associate’s degree in Human Services at Minneapolis Community and Technical College; Amber Leger (Leech Lake Ojibwe) is pursuing an associate’s degree in Business Management at Minneapolis Community and Technical College; Anne O’Keefe-Jackson (Lower Sioux) is pursuing a master’s degree in Business Administration at Augsburg College; Jason Poitra (Turtle Mountain Ojibwe) will pursue a welding certificate at Dunwoody College of Technology; Samora Redding (White Earth Ojibwe) is pursuing an associate’s degree in Human Services at Minneapolis Community and Technical College; and Sasina Samreth (White Earth Ojibwe) is pursuing a certificate in Accounting at Minneapolis Community and Technical College.

More info can be found at: //tiwahefoundation.org/aifep-fund .

 


March What's New in the Community
Tuesday, March 14 2017
 
Written by The Circle,
Average user rating    (0 vote)

Liberty named U.S. presidential scholarship candidate

whatsnewliberty.jpgMitakamizi Liberty (Leech Lake Band Ojibwe), a graduating senior at TrekNorth High School, has been named one of more than 4,000 candidates in the 2017 U.S. Presidential Scholars Program. He is the son of Leslie Harper and Adrian Liberty, and is the only Minnesota student from outside the Twin Cities area to be named a candidate.

The candidates were selected from nearly 3.5 million students expected to graduate from U.S. high schools in the year 2017. Scholars are selected on the basis of superior academic and artistic achievements, leadership qualities, strong character and involvement in community and school activities.

Annually, up to 161 U.S. Presidential Scholars are chosen from among that year’s senior class, representing excellence in education and the promise of greatness in America's youth. All Scholars are invited to Washington, DC in June for the National Recognition Program, featuring various events and enrichment activities and culminating in the presentation of the Presidential Scholars Medallion during a White House-sponsored ceremony.

A distinguished panel of educators will review the submissions and select 800 semifinalists in early April. The Commission on Presidential Scholars, a group of up to 32 eminent citizens appointed by the President, will select the finalists, and the U.S. Department of Education will announce the Scholars in May.

Paquin named to Northwest Minnesota Foundation board

whatsnewpaquin.jpgMichelle Paquin (Red Lake) has been elected to the Northwest Minnesota Foundation Board of Directors. Paquin is tribal legal advisor for the Red Lake Band of Chippewa Indians and adjunct faculty at Red Lake Nation Tribal College. She is a graduate of the University of Minnesota and William Mitchell College of Law.

Paquin was previously employed with Battered Women’s Legal Advocacy Project, Southern Minnesota Regional Legal Services and as Red Lake Nation Chief Tribal Prosecutor. She has served on the Red Lake Political Education Committee since 2002.

 

 

AIFEP awards grants to eleven recipients

Eleven grants were awarded to Native American individuals in the Twin Cities through Tiwahe Foundation’s American Indian Family Empowerment Program Fund (AIFEP). The  grants are made in partnership with the Two Feathers Fund of The Saint Paul Foundation. AIFEP strives to reverse the social, educational and economic challenges facing American Indians by investing in human capital, skills and cultural strengths through three priority areas: cultural connections, educational achievement and economic self-sufficiency.

During the January 2017 grant round, the following individuals received awards in the Educational Achievement category:
• Brittany Austin (Standing Rock Sioux) to support her education at Minneapolis Community and Technical College. Brittany is pursuing an Associate’s Degree in Education.
• Jolene Chestnut (White Earth Ojibwe) to support her education at the University of Minnesota-Duluth. Jolene is in her final year of the Master of Tribal Administration and Governance Program.
• Akikwe Cornell (Sault Sainte Marie) to support her education at the University of Minnesota. Akikwe is completing a doctoral program in the Department of American Studies.
• Honor Lamont (Oglala Lakota) to support her education at Minneapolis Community and Technical College. Honor is pursuing an Associate’s Degree in Human Services.
• Amber Leger (Leech Lake Ojibwe) to support her education at Minneapolis Community and Technical College. Amber is pursuing an Associate’s Degree in Business Management.
• Anne O’Keefe-Jackson (Lower Sioux) to support her education at Augsburg College. Anne is pursuing a Masters of Business Administration.
• Jason Poitra (Turtle Mountain Ojibwe) to support his education at Dunwoody College of Technology. Jason is pursuing a one year welding certificate.
• Samora Redding (White Earth Ojibwe) to support her education at Minneapolis Community and Technical College. Samora is pursuing an Associate’s Degree in Human Services.
• Sasina Samreth (White Earth Ojibwe) to support her education at Minneapolis Community and Technical College. Sasina is pursuing a certificate in Accounting.
 The awardees in the Economic Self-Sufficiency category are:
• David Bernie (Yankton Sioux) to bring Indigemojis, an Indigenous Sticker Emoji app, to the Android market. Indigemojis launched for iOS August of 2016 and includes categories such as Women Warriors, Francis Frybread, Indian Love, Pow Wow and Activism.
• Benjamin Spears (Red Lake Ojibwe) to upgrade business equipment for Spears Tree Care. Benjamin has worked as a Certified Arborist for the Minneapolis Parks and Recreation Board for over a decade and runs his own business providing consultation and diagnosis, trimming, removal and disease control.

FM radio station will operate from Waite House in Mpls

A low-power FM radio station owned by Pillsbury United Communities  (PUC) and operated out of the Waite House Community Center in Minneapolis, will officially launch with online streaming and a mobile app on March 20th. Over-the-air broadcast will begin later this summer on 98.9 FM (KRSM-LP).

The radio station hopes to provide a platform to raise up the stories of the community and enable marginalized and erased voices to be present in the media. The station will be a voice for the South Minneapolis community, broadcasting news, music, and community issues in multiple languages. Anyone interested in starting a radio show is encouraged to visit the stations’ website (www.krsmradio.org) to view a calendar of upcoming free trainings and fill out an application. No experience is necessary.
 

With online streaming and a mobile app, the station will launch with over 30 diverse programs covering topics like health and wellness, entrepreneurship, local politics and community organizing, as well as music shows and culturally-specific programming. The station’s schedule will also feature syndicated content like Democracy Now (including a rebroadcast of their popular Headlines segment read in Spanish), and a number of recordings about language, history, and culture recorded by radio stations located on reservations in White Earth and Leech Lake.
The Southside Media Project will allow community members to share their stories, report on the news, and discuss issues that are most important to them, while also providing training and internships for people interested in communications, media, and journalism.


February What's New in the Community
Wednesday, February 08 2017
 
Written by The Circle,
Average user rating    (0 vote)

Ramsey County Chief Deput Sheriff is Native and a woman

whatsnewfebnativesheriff.jpgJulie Rudie has been appointed Ramsey County Sheriff Jack Serier’s second-in-command. She takes up the role that Serier held until is appointment to sheriff on Jan. 10. Rudie is the first woman to be chief deputy at the Ramsey County sheriff’s office, and is a member of the Lower Sioux Indian Community.  

Rudie began working for the St. Paul Police Department in 1990. She has worked for the Ramsey County sheriff’s office since 2011. She was previously undersheriff of the administration division and now supervises day-to-day operations of the sheriff’s office, with 400 members, 200 volunteers and an annual budget of  $56 million.

“I’m very excited and I’m honored,” Rudie told the St. Paul Pioneer Press.

Rudie has a bachelor’s degree in criminology from the University of Minnesota-Duluth and graduated from the Northwestern University Center for Public Safety’s School of Police Staff and Command.

Ira Jourdain joins Minneapolis School Board

irajourdainwhatsnew.jpgAt its first meeting of the year, the Minneapolis Board of Education welcomed three new Directors who began four-year terms in January: KerryJo Felder, Bob Walser, and Native American Ira Jourdain.

Jourdain was born in Red Lake, Minnesota and is an enrolled member of the Red Lake Band of Ojibwe. Jourdain has four children; two of them are currently enrolled at Bancroft Elementary School. He’s been involved in his children’s schools through volunteer work and serving on various site councils.

It’s his work in human services as a Minnesota Family Investment Program Manager –  helping families overcome challenges like domestic abuse, substance abuse and affordable housing – along with his experience as a Native American parent that compelled Jourdain to run for the school board. He has a keen understanding of what many families face.
Jourdain is a resident of the Kingfield neighborhood in Southwest Minneapolis. His school board term will run from 2017 to 2020.

NACC Names Antony Stately as new CEO

 The Native American Community Clinic (NACC) board of directors unanimously voted to select Antony L. Stately, Ph.D. as the new CEO of NACC. He is replacing Dr. Lydia Caros who is retiring after 14 years. Antony recently served as the Director of Behavior Health Programs for the Shakopee Mdewakanton Sioux Community overseeing the administrative and clinical direction of an interdisciplinary team of psychologists, social workers, and licensed chemical health counselors in a tribal-based outpatient setting. Prior to that, he co-directed the Indigenous Wellness Research Institute at the University of Washington in Seattle.

An enrolled member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin, Stately graduated from South High School and attended Antioch University in Los Angles and received a B.A. in Liberal Arts. From there, he obtained a M.A. in Clinical Psychology and his Ph.D. from the California School of Professional Psychology in Los Angeles.

He has held numerous positions as adjunct faculty and associate clinical professors in Washington and California and has provided consulting services for tribal, state and the federal government on key health issues across Native communities. A lecturer and speaker on mental health, historical trauma, oppression, and substance abuse, Stately is also an accomplished co-author and author on GLBTQ issues, particularly in Native communities.

Stately was chosen after an extensive national search. The board enthusiastically agreed that his expertise in Native health and wellness and his considerable management skills would help NACC build on its success in revitalizing communities and lead the next phase of the clinic’s growth and development. He brings a clear understanding of how the public, private and philanthropic sectors can work together to create better health outcomes in our community and he has a long track record of identifying innovative solutions to difficult challenges. Stately’s has a calm demeanor, quick sense of humor, and a commitment to service and help others. The experience of growing up in South Minneapolis, in the heart of the American Indian community, still informs his view of the world today.

First Nations Awards $310,000 in food grants

First Nations Development Institute (First Nations) announced the selection of 21 tribes and Native American organizations to receive grants to start or expand nutrition education programming in their communities as part of the USDA’s Food Distribution Program on Indian Reservations (FDPIR).

First Nations awarded a total $310,000 to 21 grantees across 12 states. The award amounts vary by grantee. Under this project, the FDPIR programs will expand access to nutrition education programs in Native communities and measure the effectiveness of education interventions. These grants allow tribes to design or expand culturally- and community-based nutrition education projects that encourage individuals and families to improve their nutrition, healthy habits, plus generally broaden access to nutrition education programs.

The regional recipients are: Red Lake Band of Chippewa Indians, Red Lake, Minnesota, $10,000; Spirit Lake Tribe, Fort Totten, North Dakota, $20,000; Oneida Tribe of Indians of Wisconsin, Oneida, Wisconsin, $20,000; Menominee Indian Tribe of Wisconsin, Keshena, Wisconsin, $26,000; REDCO (Rosebud Economic Development Corporation), Mission, South Dakota, $15,000; and Thunder Valley Community Development Corporation, Porcupine, South Dakota, $15,000. 

First Nations has been working to restore Native American control and culturally-compatible stewardship of the assets they own – be they land, human potential, cultural heritage or natural resources – and to establish new assets for ensuring the long-term vitality of Native American communities. For more info, see www.firstnations.org.


<< Start < Prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Next > End >>

Results 1 - 9 of 125

****SPONSORS

bald_eagle_erectors_web_size.jpg  bsbc_ccs_online_logo.jpg

mia.jpg commonbondsmapleterrace.jpg commonbondsoakridge.jpg commonbondswesttonka.jpg