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What's New in The Community


February What's New in the Community
Wednesday, February 08 2017
 
Written by The Circle,
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Ramsey County Chief Deput Sheriff is Native and a woman

whatsnewfebnativesheriff.jpgJulie Rudie has been appointed Ramsey County Sheriff Jack Serier’s second-in-command. She takes up the role that Serier held until is appointment to sheriff on Jan. 10. Rudie is the first woman to be chief deputy at the Ramsey County sheriff’s office, and is a member of the Lower Sioux Indian Community.  

Rudie began working for the St. Paul Police Department in 1990. She has worked for the Ramsey County sheriff’s office since 2011. She was previously undersheriff of the administration division and now supervises day-to-day operations of the sheriff’s office, with 400 members, 200 volunteers and an annual budget of  $56 million.

“I’m very excited and I’m honored,” Rudie told the St. Paul Pioneer Press.

Rudie has a bachelor’s degree in criminology from the University of Minnesota-Duluth and graduated from the Northwestern University Center for Public Safety’s School of Police Staff and Command.

Ira Jourdain joins Minneapolis School Board

irajourdainwhatsnew.jpgAt its first meeting of the year, the Minneapolis Board of Education welcomed three new Directors who began four-year terms in January: KerryJo Felder, Bob Walser, and Native American Ira Jourdain.

Jourdain was born in Red Lake, Minnesota and is an enrolled member of the Red Lake Band of Ojibwe. Jourdain has four children; two of them are currently enrolled at Bancroft Elementary School. He’s been involved in his children’s schools through volunteer work and serving on various site councils.

It’s his work in human services as a Minnesota Family Investment Program Manager –  helping families overcome challenges like domestic abuse, substance abuse and affordable housing – along with his experience as a Native American parent that compelled Jourdain to run for the school board. He has a keen understanding of what many families face.
Jourdain is a resident of the Kingfield neighborhood in Southwest Minneapolis. His school board term will run from 2017 to 2020.

NACC Names Antony Stately as new CEO

 The Native American Community Clinic (NACC) board of directors unanimously voted to select Antony L. Stately, Ph.D. as the new CEO of NACC. He is replacing Dr. Lydia Caros who is retiring after 14 years. Antony recently served as the Director of Behavior Health Programs for the Shakopee Mdewakanton Sioux Community overseeing the administrative and clinical direction of an interdisciplinary team of psychologists, social workers, and licensed chemical health counselors in a tribal-based outpatient setting. Prior to that, he co-directed the Indigenous Wellness Research Institute at the University of Washington in Seattle.

An enrolled member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin, Stately graduated from South High School and attended Antioch University in Los Angles and received a B.A. in Liberal Arts. From there, he obtained a M.A. in Clinical Psychology and his Ph.D. from the California School of Professional Psychology in Los Angeles.

He has held numerous positions as adjunct faculty and associate clinical professors in Washington and California and has provided consulting services for tribal, state and the federal government on key health issues across Native communities. A lecturer and speaker on mental health, historical trauma, oppression, and substance abuse, Stately is also an accomplished co-author and author on GLBTQ issues, particularly in Native communities.

Stately was chosen after an extensive national search. The board enthusiastically agreed that his expertise in Native health and wellness and his considerable management skills would help NACC build on its success in revitalizing communities and lead the next phase of the clinic’s growth and development. He brings a clear understanding of how the public, private and philanthropic sectors can work together to create better health outcomes in our community and he has a long track record of identifying innovative solutions to difficult challenges. Stately’s has a calm demeanor, quick sense of humor, and a commitment to service and help others. The experience of growing up in South Minneapolis, in the heart of the American Indian community, still informs his view of the world today.

First Nations Awards $310,000 in food grants

First Nations Development Institute (First Nations) announced the selection of 21 tribes and Native American organizations to receive grants to start or expand nutrition education programming in their communities as part of the USDA’s Food Distribution Program on Indian Reservations (FDPIR).

First Nations awarded a total $310,000 to 21 grantees across 12 states. The award amounts vary by grantee. Under this project, the FDPIR programs will expand access to nutrition education programs in Native communities and measure the effectiveness of education interventions. These grants allow tribes to design or expand culturally- and community-based nutrition education projects that encourage individuals and families to improve their nutrition, healthy habits, plus generally broaden access to nutrition education programs.

The regional recipients are: Red Lake Band of Chippewa Indians, Red Lake, Minnesota, $10,000; Spirit Lake Tribe, Fort Totten, North Dakota, $20,000; Oneida Tribe of Indians of Wisconsin, Oneida, Wisconsin, $20,000; Menominee Indian Tribe of Wisconsin, Keshena, Wisconsin, $26,000; REDCO (Rosebud Economic Development Corporation), Mission, South Dakota, $15,000; and Thunder Valley Community Development Corporation, Porcupine, South Dakota, $15,000. 

First Nations has been working to restore Native American control and culturally-compatible stewardship of the assets they own – be they land, human potential, cultural heritage or natural resources – and to establish new assets for ensuring the long-term vitality of Native American communities. For more info, see www.firstnations.org.


January Whats New
Monday, January 09 2017
 
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ICWA Personal Stories Video Project Launch

 Recognizing the need for Indian Child Welfare Act (ICWA) public education materials that can be distributed widely and throughout social media channels, the National Indian Child Welfare Association (NICWA) partnered with award-winning Producer/Director Karen Odyniec and Producer Milo Daemgen to produce four short-form digital stories that are informative.
 The multi-part digital storytelling series, The Heart of ICWA, features Native families sharing their stories of family upheaval, perseverance, healing, and resilience in the face of threats to their well-being. In this series, families convey firsthand what happens when the basic protections of ICWA are followed and the devastating consequences when families and children are deprived of these basic rights.  
 Over the next month, these videos will be launched on NICWA’s YouTube channel and shared over social media.  For more info, see: www.nicwa.org.

NAP launches Generation Indigenous Response Fund

 Native Americans in Philanthropy (NAP) is launching a response fund to support youth organizing and activism that requires immediate action at Standing Rock. This new Generation Indigenous Response Fund will be housed at The Minneapolis Foundation and will bridge funders and organizers to support Native American youth organizing and its commitment to systemic change and social justice in Indigenous communities.
With the Native American youth-led movement at the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation in North Dakota against the Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL) taking a national stage, NAP and The Minneapolis Foundation recognize that we are living in a pivotal moment for youth-led movements. “Across the country, and at Standing Rock, young people are playing leading roles in social justice movements that advance a vision for a just society. Now is a critical moment to support Native American youth who are showing a readiness to organize in building lasting movements for social change,” said Sarah Eagle Heart, CEO of NAP.
The NAP GenIndigenous Response Fund will provide grants up to $5,000 to youth organizing groups responding to the current moment in ways that build long-term power for Native youth. The fund will provide grants to Native American-led organizations playing leadership roles at Standing Rock while considering efforts to support the long term engagement of Native American youth leaders in advocacy efforts. The grant will focus on strategic communications; education; workforce development; juvenile justice; resiliency; traditional knowledge; sustainability; environmental justice; health & well-being; as well as trauma & healing. For more info, see: nativephilanthropy.org.

'Warrior Nation' wins Denver Public Library history prize

“Warrior Nation: A History of the Red Lake Ojibwe," written by Anton Treuer, has won the Denver Public Library’s Caroline Bancroft History Prize. The annual prize is “awarded to the author of the best book on Colorado or Western American History published during the current year”.
"Warrior Nation" explores 250 years of the history of the Red Lake Nation. It offers a chronicle of the Red Lake Nation, and a compelling perspective on a difficult piece of U.S. history.
Treuer conducted oral histories with elders across the Red Lake reservation, learning the stories carried by the people. For the book, the Red Lake band for the first time made available its archival collections, including the personal papers of Peter Graves, a political strategist and tribal leader for the first half of the 20th Century, which tell a story about the negotiations over reservation boundaries.
The winning book collects a $1,000 prize. “Warrior Nation” won the Award of Merit from the American Association for State and Local History in June, and was a finalist for Minnesota Book Award and the Hogander Book Award.

Minnesota Groups Honored for Improving Lives

Some of Minnesota’s human-service groups and agencies have been selected to receive the 2016 Commissioner's Circle of Excellence Awards from the Minnesota Department of Human Services.
Emily Piper, state commissioner of human services, said these are groups that help support healthy people, stable families and strong communities. Among this year’s winners is the White Earth MOMS program, which works with pregnant and parenting women and their partners to reduce the number of babies born with neonatal opioid withdrawal syndrome.
Other groups honored this year include the Minnesota Indian Women’s Resource Center, the Fond du Lac Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Human Services Division, Carlton County Public Health and Human Services, the Korean Center, Morrison County’s Accountable Community for Health, the Food Group and The Arts Center of St. Peter.

Dec. What's New in the Community
Tuesday, December 06 2016
 
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MHS Announces New Director of American Indian Initiatives

The Minnesota Historical Society (MNHS) has appointed Joe D. Horse Capture as the new director of American Indian Initiatives. MNHS created the leadership position to help develop and implement a vision and strategy for American Indian programs and services in collaboration with American Indian communities throughout the state and beyond.

“MNHS has been building relationships with American Indian communities,” said Stephen Elliott, director and CEO. “We welcome the leadership Joe Horse Capture will provide in developing existing relationships and building new ones between MNHS and American Indian communities to better interpret and share our history.”
Horse Capture is an enrolled member of the A’aninin (Gros Ventre) Tribe of Montana. Since 2013 he has been a curator for the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of the American Indian.

Prior to that he served for 15 years as a curator of Native American arts at the Minneapolis Institute of Arts. His work history has allowed him to build strong working relationships with many tribes. “This type of collaborative work is what I enjoy the most, and I have come to believe collaborative efforts should be paramount among the priorities of cultural institutions,” he said. Horse Capture’s start date is Dec. 5, 2016.

The Minnesota Historical Society is a non-profit educational and cultural institution established in 1849. For info, see mnhs.org.

Watermark hires Native Am. Gallery Program Director  

The Watermark Art Center in Bemidji, Minn. has hired Karen Goulet (White Earth Ojibwe) as Program Director of the Native American Gallery. Goulet recently completed her role as the program coordinator of Gizhiigin Arts Initiative, a tribal entity serving artists on the White Earth reservation. In addition to her work as an arts leader, Goulet is also a multi-discipline artist who has been showing art both nationally and internationally for twenty years.

Goulet has longstanding ties to the region, with both her parents growing up and attending school in Bemidji.
As Program Director of the Native American Gallery, Goulet will be responsible for the development and orientation of Watermark’s Native American Gallery and related programming. She will also act as community liaison to cultivate relationships with Native American artists and tribal members.

Goulet earned her BA in Fine Arts and Cultural Education from The Evergreen State College, her MFA in Sculpture from The University of Wisconsin – Madison, and her M Ed from University of Minnesota Duluth. Throughout her career, she has worked primarily in education, most often with Indigenous institutions and programs.

Heid Erdrich’s new collection named the 2016 Winter Book

Heid Erdrich’s (Turtle Mountain Ojibwe) new collection has been named 2016 Winter Book by the Minnesota Center for Book Arts. “every-blest-thing-seeing-eye” features poetry and prose, and explores the complex conversations between artists and viewers. “every-blest-thing-seeing-eye” features poetry and prose by Erdrich, a poet, writer, and faculty mentor for Augsburg College Low-residency MFA. The Winter Book was produced in two editions, with illustrations by Jim Denomie, Aza Erdrich, Eric Gansworth, Dyani Whitehawk, Louise Erdrich, Adrea Carlson, and Jonathan Thunder.

Artists, staff and board at MCBA will celebrate the handmade book on December 10. at 7 pm. Readings by Heid E. Erdrich will be followed by a book signing and public reception with light refreshments in MCBA’s Studios and Gallery. Free and open to the public.
MCBA’s annual Winter Book publication was created to preserve and promote the traditional crafts of bookmaking (hand papermaking, letterpress printing, printmaking and hand bookbinding), and the contemporary exploration of the book as art. Since 1988, Winter Book has engaged artists, designers, papermakers, printers, bookbinders and community volunteers in producing a handmade, limited edition artist’s book featuring poetry by a Minnesota author or editor. The hand craftsmanship of each Winter Book makes it a collected series, included in museum and rare book library collections across the country.


November Whats New in the Community
Monday, November 07 2016
 
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Four Native women running for MN office

Four Native American women are running for Minnesota offices this November.
• Incumbent Susan Allen (Rosebud Sioux) is a Democratic-Farmer-Labor member of the Minnesota House of Representatives, representing District 62B. She was elected in a January 10, 2012 special election to the fill the vacancy created by Jeff Hayden.
• Peggy Flanagan (White Earth Ojibwe) is a Democratic-Farmer-Labor member of the Minnesota House of Representatives, representing District 46A. She was first elected to the chamber in a special election on November 3, 2015.
• Attorney Jamie Becker-Finn (Leech Lake Ojibwe) is running for Minnesota House District 42B (DFL). She currently work as an Assistant Hennepin County Attorney at the Domestic Abuse Service Center.
• Mary Kunesh-Podein is running for House of Representatives, District 41B. She has been a teacher for 22 years, is chair of the Park, Recreation and Environment Board in New Brighton, and building steward and member of the negotiations team for the Robbinsdale Federation of teachers Union.

Election day is November 8th. To find out where to vote in your area and information on who is running, see: http://www.sos.state.mn.us/elections-voting.

 

Mpls IHB Receives MSPI Generation-Indigenous Award

On September 29th, the White House, IHS Principal Deputy Director Mary L. Smith announced Methamphetamine and Suicide Prevention Initiative (MSPI) funding awards to 42 Tribes, tribal organizations, IHS federal programs, and Urban Indian organizations. The four-year awards are part of the White House’s Generation Indigenous initiative to focus on improving the lives of Native youth.

The Indian Health Board of Minneapolis (IHB) is one of these new awardees.­ IHB specializes in healthcare for the urban American Indian community in the Twin Cities, and the $138K of new annual funding will be used in IHB’s Counseling and Support Clinic to integrate traditional and western mental health practices for healing historical and personal trauma, fostering resiliency, and promoting family engagement among Native youth up to age 24. The grant’s ultimate objective is to reduce suicide in Native youth, which is why drumming is central to the program.

“The drum is our mother’s heart, and we seek its sound for spiritual comfort and optimal safety,” explains Richard Wright (Leech Lake), IHB’s Chemical Health Specialist and resident elder. Planning work will begin in November; drum-making and drumming groups will start in early 2017. The program is called Dewe’igan, Zhewindindiwin (Drum Teachings for Success).

 

Jeffers Petroglyphs to change name, community input requested

The Jeffers Petroglyphs are 5,000 sacred carvings made by American Indian ancestors thousands of years ago on a ridge in southwestern Minnesota. This ridge was a destination for many American Indians, including ancestors of the Dakota, Cheyenne, Ojibwe, Ioway, Omaha, Otoe, Ponca, Mandan, Arapaho, Crow and Hidatsa. The current name of this historical site, “Jeffers Petroglyphs”, reflects the name of the family who once owned the land where the carvings are located.

The Minnesota Historical Society (MNHS), which is responsible for the site’s preservation, invites the community’s input as it explores renaming this historic site. If a new name is chosen, it will showcase the importance of this special place to all people, but especially American Indians, and it will better tell the story of the carvings and the people who made them.

American Indian people are especially urged to attend an upcoming meeting; and all people are welcome. The gathering will be moderated by facilitator and consultant Everett Black Thunder (Oneida/Sisseton/Wahpeton Oyate). Snacks and beverages will be provided.

The event will take place on Nov. 19 at the Jeffers Petroglyphs, 27160 County Road 2, Comfrey, MN. Those who are unable to attend in person can provide feedback via email to This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it or by calling 651-259-3130.

Letters can also be sent to: Minnesota Historical Society, ATTN: Jeffers Name Input, 345 Kellogg Blvd. W, St. Paul, MN 55101. (A previous gathering to discuss this topic was held in late October in Minneapolis.)


October Whats New
Tuesday, October 11 2016
 
Written by Catherine,
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Tom Goldtooth To Receive Top Sierra Club Award

tomgoldtooth.jpgTom Goldtooth, a Native American environmental leader known nationally for his tireless efforts to defend Indigenous rights to a healthy environment and his dedicated work against fossil fuel projects like the Keystone XL pipeline has received the Sierra Club’s 2016 John Muir Award.
 Goldtooth, of Bemidji, Minn., has spent more than 40 years helping Native American and indigenous communities worldwide address issues such as environmental protection, climate change, energy, biodiversity, environmental health, water, and sustainable development. Tom and his son Dallas have both been leaders on domestic and international efforts to keep fossil fuels in ground and foster indigenous-based environmental protection initiatives. Tom’s tireless work to elevate tribal opposition to the Keystone XL tar sands pipeline was key to the project’s ultimate rejection by the Obama Administration. Tom has served as the Executive Director of the Indigenous Environmental Network since 1996 and is now helping lead and coordinate the ongoing tribal opposition to the Dakota Access pipeline.
 The majority of the awards were presented at a ceremony in Oakland, CA on Sept. 10. For more information on the Sierra Club awards program, visit www.sierraclub.org/awards.

Dr. Arne Vainio Recognized as Unsung Hero with $10,000 Award

arnevainio.jpgThe McKnight Foundation and the Minnesota Council of Nonprofits (MCN) have selected Dr. Arne Vainio of Cloquet as one of four recipients of the 2016 Virginia McKnight Binger Unsung Hero Awards.
Dr. Vainio is a member of the Mille Lacs Band of Ojibwe and a physician at the Min-No-Aya-Win Human Services Clinic on the Fond du Lac Ojibwe Reservation. Dr. Vainio spends long hours serving his patients at the clinic, as well as traveling to reservations across America to discuss native health, suicide and native traditions. His passion for health led to bringing his popular "Mad DR. Science Project” to many classrooms, with the goal of inspiring young Native Americans to take up careers in health and science.
Dr. Vainio received a cash prize of $10,000 from the McKnight Foundation and MCN during an awards luncheon at the McKnight Foundation in Minneapolis on September 9. Award recipients will also be recognized at the 2016 MCN Annual Conference on October 6 in Duluth, MN.
Since 1985, The McKnight Foundation has recognized Minnesotans who have improved the quality of life for individuals and the community around them through the Virginia McKnight Binger Awards in Human Service. In 2015, MCN partnered with McKnight to coordinate and present the first-ever Unsung Hero Awards, honoring individuals doing life-changing work in communities across Minnesota with little or no recognition.

Patricia Deinhart-Bauknight is New Wicoie Nandagikendan ED

Patricia Deinhart-Bauknight is the new executive director of Wicoie Nandagikendan.  Patricia has worked in Indian Country for many years. She was a Program Officer at The Saint Paul Foundation and Northwest Area Foundation.  Patricia has also worked as executive director of Whittier Alliance and Whittier Housing Corporation.  For 10 years Patricia was president of the Volunteer Network in Chicago providing management and technical assistance to emerging community organizations throughout the City.
Most recently, she was a partner in The Urban Design Lab, a Northside business, focused on designing and implementing community engagement processes to meet specific project needs; conducting research to develop and evaluate programs; facilitating community strategy development; grant writing and management consulting.

Audra Tonihka named one of the Top Women in Finance of 2016

Finance & Commerce have announced their Top Women in Finance awards. Top Women in Finance honorees were judged for their leadership and service to their community, professional accomplishments and dedication to the profession. Among the honorees is Audra Tonihka of White Earth Investment Initiative, Midwest Minnesota CDC. Tonihka is an enrolled White Earth tribal member who grew up in the community of White Earth and received a bachelor’s degree in business management. Prior to joining the White Earth Investment Initiative staff, she served as a loan officer for the tribal credit union.
Finance & Commerce will recognize this year’s Top Women in Finance at a Nov. 17 event. This is the program’s 16th year of honoring women in finance, business and other sectors.
For more info, see: http://finance-commerce.com/2010/08/top-women-in-finance.

Watermark Art Center awarded $47,951 for Native programming

Watermark Art Center is a recipient of an Art Access grant from the Minnesota State Arts Board. Watermark has been awarded $47,951 for program development relating to its Native American gallery and efforts to foster strategic, long-term engagement with regional Native American artists.
“We are thrilled about what this means to future programming at the art center, as well as for area Native American artists,” said Watermark Executive Director Lori Forshee-Donnay.
“Receiving an Arts Access grant provides Watermark the opportunity to further implement the ongoing efforts of our Native American Gallery committee. This opportunity is significant for the Watermark and for the region.”
The grant will expedite Watermark’s plans for the dedicated Native American Gallery by providing funding for a program director, outreach and artist development, and design and construction of gallery cases to display artwork, culminating in a guest artist juried exhibit in 2017.
Funding for the Arts Access grant was made possible through an appropriation by the Minnesota State Legislature and Cultural Heritage Fund passed by the Minnesota voters on November 4th, 2008.
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