Governor Dayton’s Sandpiper comments lack common sense foresight
Friday, October 02 2015
Written by Frank Bibeau,
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It is apparent from Governor Dayton’s recent announcement (in reaction to the Minnesota House Speaker’s allegations of appellate court meddling) that he supports the Sandpiper crude oil pipeline and that the Governor does not understand climate change, pipelines or the associated, compounded, environmental risks for Minnesota.

Sandpiper, if approved, will be the first domino in the next, big, toxic chain reaction set of future pollution dominos. What Governor Dayton fails to understand is that when you support Sandpiper, you are in support of fracking Bakken crude in North Dakota and the highly volatile, toxic gases that are being released and/or burned off. The fact is fracking Bakken crude is not profitable currently or in the foreseeable future.

When Governor Dayton supports Sandpiper fracking, then by extension the Governor supports Enbridge’s other PUC pipeline application for Line 3 co-alignment (in the same new, Enbridge preferred, pipeline corridor from Park Rapids, Minnesota to Superior, Wisconsin) which transports Canadian tar sands, the dirtiest crude oil extraction and one of the single, biggest global environmental hazards and climate change contributors, just upwind from Minnesota.

Worse, when Governor Dayton supports Sandpiper Bakken fracking and Line 3 Tar sands, then he is also supporting old Line 3 pipeline abandonment along the U.S. Highway 2 corridor to Lake Superior. A corridor where other aging pipelines need replacement in the foreseeable future. (FYI, I live within a half mile of U.S. Highway 2 and the 8 pipelines in the corridor where Enbridge’s pipeline abandonment is planned.)

Therefore, Governor Dayton really supports a series of future abandoned pipelines (for free?) across northern Minnesota along U.S. Hwy 2, for what sounds like 22 permanent new Enbridge jobs from Sandpiper? Kalamazoo should be the lesson learned not to sacrifice more of Mother Earth’s gifts and treasurers of nature and water to create a new, crude oil pipeline corridor through virgin lakes, rivers and wild rice country. We need to protect the environment for what will become the next, future, old pipelines to be abandoned, which are easily foreseeable environmental hazards for grandchildren and great-grandchildren to cope with 50-60 years from now.

Apparently Governor Dayton cannot see what the rest of us are able to see and understand. For Governor Dayton and other politicians, campaign contributions are at risk, whether from labor unions or big oil. Fortunately, the third branch of government, the Minnesota Court of Appeals, was also able to see an environmental impact statement (EIS) is necessary before the Public Utilities Commission (PUC) makes long term, important decisions about granting eminent domain for a major pipeline project. Unfortunately, the citizen, environmental intervenors had to appeal the state PUC decision to avoid an EIS, to get the review that was argued for at the PUC Sandpiper proceedings nearly a year ago.

Sandpiper pipeline involves extremely hazardous and ultra-risky activity running crude oil pipelines across the ultrasensitive aquifers, lakes and rivers fresh water sources of ecosystems and environments for three of the four North American continental watersheds (N, E and S) all beginning in northern Minnesota. Sure big oil says it can be done with 99.9999% safety, but lest we forget, before Kalamazoo the largest pipeline oil spill in the U.S. was in Grand Rapids, Minnesota right by the Mississippi River, or the Cohasset oil spill and burn-off in 2003 within a mile of the Mississippi and the big, Clearbrook fire in 2007.

We, the people, have a better chance to protect the environment with an EIS being required, but the desire for big money keeps some people trying to rush through the bureaucratic maze to get to today’s cheese with too little concern for everyone’s tomorrow.

Stop the Sandpiper and you stop the lead domino to a lot of pipeline domino insanity, incredible contributors of climate change impacts and save a lot more of the fresh water environment for those to come. Of course, the grandchildren and great-grandchildren will not be born soon enough to vote for Governor Dayton and give campaign contributions to today’s politicians. They must rely on us, citizen environmental groups and the Chippewa to be the protectors of their environment.

As Winona LaDuke often says “”Let’s make a graceful transition from a fossil fuel economy now and work towards the many, long-term, good paying jobs of environmental protection, solar energy and wind for cleaner air and water.”

Instead of pipeline abandonment, the old, badly corrupted Line 3 should be removed first! This is the best opportunity to prevent inevitable environmental risks that will happen over the next couple of centuries when Enbridge no longer exists. Then the same U.S. Hwy 2 corridor, which is already established, can be re-used for the new Line 3 if there is actually a market demand. This way Enbridge, the company that wants to benefit for decades to come, will actually bear some of the environmental clean-up costs to make our environment safer now.

This kind of Line 3 replacement project will probably create 2-3 times as many jobs, all across northern Minnesota for probably a couple extra years, and no new land owners would be impacted within the existing right-of-way corridors, where Enbridge already has leased that parallel U.S. Highway 2. This would eliminate the need for new water crossings and eminent domain across new, untouched aquatic territories and private property.

It makes no good sense to give away our best gifts and treasures from Mother Earth (the nature and water) to only make certain, future, environmental destruction which will require even higher clean-up costs. It’s all foreseeable.

Love Water, Not Oil!

Frank Bibeau is a member of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Pillager Band. He is an attorney for Honor the Earth at the Minnesota PUC for the Sandpiper pipeline proceedings.

From the Editor's Desk: Sovereignty and responsibility
Friday, August 28 2015
Written by Alfred Walking Bull, The Circle Managing Editor,
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awb-office-web.jpgIn this issue, we've explored the acts of Ojibwe citizens who are exercising their treaty rights by harvesting wild rice in off-reservation territory as well as the impacts of other tribes asserting their authority in economic, land and environmental concerns.

One of the more outstanding speeches on the Rosebud Sioux Tribal Council floor while I served as the managing editor of The Sicangu Eyapaha, was given by Rep. Russell Eagle Bear (Black Pipe Community). When a tribal citizens spoke on what the council should do to exercise sovereignty in his name, Eagle Bear countered with, “Take out your wallet, look at your ID, is that a South Dakota ID? When you receive a Social Security check, do you cash it? Yes? Then you are not sovereign.”

It was one of the more bold statements made about the state of tribal and individual sovereignty in America. In two questions, Eagle Bear had reminded us all that we are dependent on a foreign government that dictates our own powers to us in our own territory and either we must accept what is given to us or we must make sacrifices and do what's best to ensure our collective future.

In that spirit of sovereignty, we take a moment to consider this newspaper. This newspaper has been the paper of record for the Twin Cities and regional Native communities for over 35 years. It is an independent body, free from tribal government and private influences. In Western parlance, we consider a newspaper and the journalists it employs members of the Fourth Estate.

GUEST COLUMN: Trahant Reports
Monday, August 03 2015
Written by Mark Trahant,
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mark trahant.jpgPresidential Debate season begins on Aug. 6

What do you do with sixteen candi­dates? It’s a thorny problem for Republi­cans. Why’s that? Because right now one of those candidates, Donald Trump, is loud enough to drown out all the other “major” candidates.

Wouldn’t it be fun if the nomina­tion contest was more like a basketball tournament? Then top-seeded Donald Trump would battle 16th seed Ohio Gov. John Kasich a battle of ideas. Or how about dropping the bunch in the jungle Naked and Afraid. We could even start voting and eliminate a candidate every week, until it’s just the Republican versus a Democrat.

Enough. Back to the chaos. And Don­ald Trump.

As The Washington Post put it on July 26: “For yet another week, Trump talk dominated the Sunday morning political shows, with several devoting roundtable discussions to his disruption of the GOP presidential primary and at least two of his GOP rivals using their clashes with him in recent days as a means of secur­ing interviews on the shows — during which they continued to clash with him.”

On Aug. 6 in Cleveland the first debate is set, an opportunity to raise serious issues. As if. It’s more likely that it will be Trump versus the other nine candidates tossing one liners back and forth.

Of course American Indian and Alaska Native issues don’t get attention this early anyway. Usually that hap­pens late in the campaigns, during the general election, when a position paper is released that outlines the candidate’s official policy. That’s too bad. It would be good to press candidates from both parties about how they see treaties, the federal-Indian relationship, and the management of federal programs that serve Native Americans.

From the Editor's Desk: Learning lessons from the past, going forward
Monday, August 03 2015
Written by Alfred Walking Bull, The Circle Managing Editor,
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awb-office-web.jpgEvery six months, Isaac Iron Shell, Sr. would take his cattle to the stock mar­ket and sell what he could. Shortly there­after, his wife, Susan Standing Bull-Iron Shell would sit with her six children and go through the Sears-Roebuck and JC Penny catalogs and they would pick out dresses, shoes and coats for the coming six months. Like clockwork, my grandparents provided for their five daughters and son in prepara­tion for Christmas and the school year at the St. Francis Mission on the Rosebud reserva­tion.

My mother, aunts and uncle were among the more fortunate and privileged on the res­ervation in those days, both parents worked hard through the year, farming, ranching, canning, drying and providing for the pros­perity of their children and grandchildren.

The school year, however, was fraught with its own difficulties. My grandfather knew the stories from his relatives about how the Jesuit priests and nuns would abuse children, emo­tionally, physically and sexually. The story my mother told me was that while both my grandparents were devout Catholics, they re­mained true to their traditions and practiced Wolakota in secret. Living that dual existence also taught them to understand the darker aspects of the Black Robes and work within that particular system of oppression. Grand­father Iron Shell became a senior catechist in his younger days, proclaiming the Word of Christ, facilitating liturgy and playing the fiddle and organ for the monthly Mass in Up­per Cut Meat Community.

He did these things, according to my moth­er, to ensure his children would not be sub­ject to the physical and sexual abuse of the missionaries. It was quid pro quo with no written agreement, only a tacit understanding and faith that whatever humanity remained in the predators at the mission would honor the covenant he made with them to leave his daughters alone. While removed from the darker corners of the boarding school experi­ence, my mother and her sisters and brother still received their fair share of emotional and psychological abuse. In one instance that haunted her until the early 1990s, my mother was forced to watch as a bride of Christ incin­erated kittens in front of her class to, as my mother put it, “remind us who was in charge and how they didn’t fear anyone.”

Letters: Welcome Back to MPS Native Families
Monday, August 03 2015
Written by Deanna StandingCloud,
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It’s hard to believe we’re approaching yet another school year here in Minneapolis. Native families will spend this month scrambling to hold onto remnants of summer living while preparing their children for focusing on their academics.

As the Family Engagement Coordinator for Minneapolis Indian Education, I would like to extend an invitation to connect with me about ways to help our children be successful in school. I’m a Minneapolis parent myself.  I don’t claim to have all the answers, but I have a solid understanding of how Minneapolis Public Schools work.

On behalf of the Minneapolis Indian Education Department, I would like to extend the opportunity to connect with me as the Family & Community Engagement Coordinator to make your child’s school year successful. Being at school is far more important for our Native students than their non-Native counterparts. There is data that shows that in order to be successful in school and graduate on time, Native families must make it a priority to be in school on time every day. There are many community resources to support you make attendance a top priority. The Division of Indian Work, one of our community partners works with students at Anishinabe Academy in the Be At School program, as well as the Check & Connect project mentors who provide practices to support their consistent attendance. Please feel free to connect with these resources at Anishinabe Academy.

Another exciting offering this year is Middle Schools with 10 or more Native students in their school will have Native student groups that meet weekly to learn more about Native culture and history, as well as meeting their fellow students in the school. Families in Middle School, check with your school’s Family Engagement Liaison to learn more about when these Native student groups meet.

The Minneapolis Indian Education Parent Committee will also be hosting our Fall Gathering sometime in October. We will once again be offering informational sessions along with educational activities for the students who attend. Lunch & door prizes will also be available. Last year, we had craft activities with the students as well as our portable planetarium so students could experience star stories.

I encourage you to reach out to me as we gear up for a new academic year in Minneapolis. Like our Facebook page

Please feel free to contact me at the Indian Education Department at 612-668-0612 or via email at This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it I look forward to working with you this year!


Deanna StandingCloud

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