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Powwow for Hope a Success
Friday, July 17 2015
 
Written by The Circle Staff,
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powwow for hope a success-ivy vaino.jpgOver 3,000 people attended the 4th Annual Powwow for Hope: Dancing for Life, Love & Hope on May 2 in Minneapolis.

The Native American community event raised over $70,000 to help prevent and fight cancer. The American Indian Cancer Foundation is honored by all the contributions that made the 2015 Powwow for Hope a huge success.
Powwow for Hope activities included: an outdoor lacrosse clinic for the youth, rock climbing, tours of the Shakopee Mdewakanton Sioux Community mobile mammography unit, survivor and caregiver specials, a presentation by Make a Wish Foundation and a jingle dress healing song.
Powwow for Hope teams played a dynamic role in fundraising for this event. A total of 34 teams raised $35,182.50. The American Indian Cancer Foundation acknowledges and appreciates each and every one of the Powwow for Hope teams.

Special recognition to the top fundraising teams:

  • Top Overall and Top Family: Team Rivera, $4,908.00

  • Top Organization: DIW (Division of Indian Work) - Two Steppers, $3,390.00

  • Top School: American Indian Magnet School, $1,872.98

  • Top Individual: Ivy Vainio, $1,810.00

Minneapolis Native Youth invited to White House
Monday, June 08 2015
 
Written by Deanna StandingCloud,
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A group of four Twin Cities Native American youth were invited to the White House for the first Tribal Youth Gathering, marking an achievement for students and an organization that is dedicated to preserving and promoting research and understanding among Native youth.

The Native Youth Alliance of Minnesota is a non-profit established in 2014. Following the 2008 Minnesota Summit on Afterschool Learning Opportunities, the Native American community took note of the disparity that research and data does not reflect Native youth.

This realization began groundbreaking work that began with a conversation to develop an Indigenous Youth Research and Development Center in 2009. Native leaders throughout the state of Minnesota really came forth with the idea that this work has never been done before.

LeMoine LaPointe, NYAM board member investigated the issue, “I was told that Native American people are statistically insignificant.” He felt that proved there was much to be done in Indian Country.

NYAM convened community conversations with various tribal communities throughout the state to collect stories directly from Native people about how they envision the Indigenous Youth Research and Development Center transforming their communities. Native leaders and youth came together on May 29 in Saint Paul, Minn. to delve deep into what research means traditionally for Native communities.

Many ideas emerged from the conversation and it is just the beginning of the work. Sierra Villebrun (White Earth), Abel Martinez (Ho-Chunk) and Lupe Thornhill (Red Lake) participated in the discussion. Villebrun is a junior at South High All Nations and has been involved with Native Youth Alliance of Minnesota as a part of the Art of Indigenous Resistance community mural project along with Martinez, a sophomore also at South High All Nations; Thornhill is from St. Paul and facilitated the conversation.


Analysis finds minorities arrested at a higher rate than whites in Mpls.
Monday, June 08 2015
 
Written by Brandt Williams, MPR News,
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analysis_finds_minorities_arrested_at_higher_rate_than_whites_in_mpls-web.jpgAn analysis released May 28 by the American Civil Liberties Union gives the most detailed picture yet of racial disparities in the treatment of low-level offenders by Minneapolis police.

Those arrested for non-felony offenses in Minneapolis are far more likely to be people of color than to be white.

The ACLU analyzed arrest data collected over nearly three years. Most of the arrests for low-level offenses occurred during traffic stops. Following FBI practice, the ACLU counts as an arrest encounters where people are merely stopped, ticketed and released.

Minneapolis police officers made nearly 100,000 non-felony arrests between Jan. 1, 2012, and Sept. 30, 2014. African-Americans and Native Americans were arrested at rates nearly nine times higher than the rate for whites.

African-Americans make up less than 19 percent of the city's population, and Native Americans just 2 percent. The arrest numbers don't include separate categories for Asians and Hispanics.

The disparity didn't come as a surprise to Henry Jackson, 55, as he stood across the street from Target Field with a handful of tickets.

Buying and selling tickets is legal, but Jackson, who's African-American, has been arrested for trespassing in the neighborhood three times since 2012.

The latest arrest happened outside nearby Target Center in January, as he was selling tickets for a Timberwolves game. He had stepped inside Target Center to warm his hands, he said, when two police officers cited and released him.

Jackson said white ticket sellers could do the same thing "all day long" without being stopped, "but it seems like they got us singled out."

Jackson was convicted, ordered to pay a $50 fine and given a stayed sentence of 90 days in the workhouse on the condition that he stay out of Target Center for a year. Now he can't enter the venue, even as a paying customer.


The Sioux Chef opening highly anticipated food truck
Monday, May 04 2015
 
Written by Alfred Walking Bull,
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tatanka_truck-web.jpgThe city of Minneapolis is anxiously anticipating the opening of The Sioux Chef’s first venue: Tatanka Truck.

Sean Sherman (Oglala Lakota) made waves over the last year by introducing his unique approach to Indigenous cuisine. Born and raised on the Pine Ridge reservation in South Dakota, he attended college at Black Hills State University. Part of his drive to create an Indigenous cuisine, free of processed sugars, dairy or flour, came from just being a chef in Minneapolis since the early 2000s,

“I had been cooking since I was 13 in the Black Hills, in tourist restaurants. And I thought It was silly that there was no Native restaurants,” Sherman said. “There were fusion recipes like buffalo burgers, wild rice risotto and pumpkin cake,” but nothing truly spoke to traditional Native food.

Sherman’s approach has also been respectful of the regional culture of the Ojibwe and Dakota people and will be reflected in the offerings of Tatanka Truck. “I’ve been surrounding myself with awesome foods and learned how people were preserving things. I learned about the ancestral food cache. For us around here, there’s lots of wild rice, corn products and all the produce that people were growing in the region. The meats are easy. We’re serving bison, turkey, duck, walleye, smoked lake fish and on occasion, rabbit.”


Columbus Statue Celebrates Genocide and Should Be Removed
Monday, May 04 2015
 
Written by Bill Sorem and Michael Mcintee, The Uptake,
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tcdp-columbus statue celebrates genocide and should be removed-web.jpgNative American activist groups in Minnesota would like people to learn the real history of Christopher Columbus and quit putting him up on a pedestal at the State Capitol.

“We all know in 1492 he sailed the ocean blue. And in 1493 he stole all that he could see,” American Indian Movement-Twin Cities Chair Mike Forcia said at a rally held on April 18 outside the Minnesota capitol building, where the statue of Columbus stands.

For more than 83 years a statue of Columbus has gazed from the Capitol toward Minnesota’s Justice Center. For Forcia, real justice would be removing the statue. “We need to deport Columbus,” he said. “We can’t be celebrating genocide anymore.”

Genocide isn’t a word most history books associate with Columbus, but he enslaved Native Americans. As governor of the large island he called Espanola (today Haiti and the Dominican Republic), Columbus’ programs reduced the native population from as many as eight million at the outset of his regime to about three million in 1496.

Minnesota’s legislature is considering a bill that would change the engraving on the statue from “Discoverer of America” to “Christopher Columbus landed in America.” A co-sponsor of the House bill includes Rep. Dean Urdahl (R-Grove City), who taught high school government classes 35 years.


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