subscribe_today.png

 
Urban News
The Sioux Chef opening highly anticipated food truck
Monday, May 04 2015
 
Written by Alfred Walking Bull,
Average user rating    (0 vote)

tatanka_truck-web.jpgThe city of Minneapolis is anxiously anticipating the opening of The Sioux Chef’s first venue: Tatanka Truck.

Sean Sherman (Oglala Lakota) made waves over the last year by introducing his unique approach to Indigenous cuisine. Born and raised on the Pine Ridge reservation in South Dakota, he attended college at Black Hills State University. Part of his drive to create an Indigenous cuisine, free of processed sugars, dairy or flour, came from just being a chef in Minneapolis since the early 2000s,

“I had been cooking since I was 13 in the Black Hills, in tourist restaurants. And I thought It was silly that there was no Native restaurants,” Sherman said. “There were fusion recipes like buffalo burgers, wild rice risotto and pumpkin cake,” but nothing truly spoke to traditional Native food.

Sherman’s approach has also been respectful of the regional culture of the Ojibwe and Dakota people and will be reflected in the offerings of Tatanka Truck. “I’ve been surrounding myself with awesome foods and learned how people were preserving things. I learned about the ancestral food cache. For us around here, there’s lots of wild rice, corn products and all the produce that people were growing in the region. The meats are easy. We’re serving bison, turkey, duck, walleye, smoked lake fish and on occasion, rabbit.”


Columbus Statue Celebrates Genocide and Should Be Removed
Monday, May 04 2015
 
Written by Bill Sorem and Michael Mcintee, The Uptake,
Average user rating    (0 vote)

tcdp-columbus statue celebrates genocide and should be removed-web.jpgNative American activist groups in Minnesota would like people to learn the real history of Christopher Columbus and quit putting him up on a pedestal at the State Capitol.

“We all know in 1492 he sailed the ocean blue. And in 1493 he stole all that he could see,” American Indian Movement-Twin Cities Chair Mike Forcia said at a rally held on April 18 outside the Minnesota capitol building, where the statue of Columbus stands.

For more than 83 years a statue of Columbus has gazed from the Capitol toward Minnesota’s Justice Center. For Forcia, real justice would be removing the statue. “We need to deport Columbus,” he said. “We can’t be celebrating genocide anymore.”

Genocide isn’t a word most history books associate with Columbus, but he enslaved Native Americans. As governor of the large island he called Espanola (today Haiti and the Dominican Republic), Columbus’ programs reduced the native population from as many as eight million at the outset of his regime to about three million in 1496.

Minnesota’s legislature is considering a bill that would change the engraving on the statue from “Discoverer of America” to “Christopher Columbus landed in America.” A co-sponsor of the House bill includes Rep. Dean Urdahl (R-Grove City), who taught high school government classes 35 years.


Strengthening Identity: The Cradleboard Project instills history and tradition
Friday, April 03 2015
 
Written by Deanna StandingCloud,
Average user rating    (0 vote)

strengthening identity- the cradleboard project instills history and tradition 2-web.jpgWhen Gavino Limon was 14 months-old, he began his professional career as a champion Grass Dancer, a mere five months after he began walking. Limon is now six years-old and continues his love for dancing as a member of the world famous Native Pride Dance Troop. His parents, Douglas and Rachel Limon believe that having him in a cradleboard during his infancy had a tremendous influence on his advanced large motor skills

Traditionally, tribal people in Minnesota, Wisconsin and the Dakotas used cradleboards for hundreds of years to carry their children. Using whatever materials within the environment, cradleboards were assembled with much care. Depending on the community, cradleboards can be constructed with cedar, oak, cattail, buckskin, animal fur and moss. In essence, a flat wooden board is the base, a frame and a headpiece, sometimes to attach toys. The baby is wrapped tightly to the board, allowing them to feel secure and also sit upright to interact with their world.  In this way, babies became accustomed to the daily activities of their tribe. The cradleboard was the first step in traditional Indigenous education.

Cradleboard advocates assert that children who have been in a cradleboard have a developmental advantage. Babies are able to observe their families and socially interact with their relatives. Parents will often claim that a baby’s leg and neck muscles are strengthened earlier than an infant who has not been placed in a cradleboard.

These benefits prompted the Limons to have their baby in a cradleboard. Before their son was born, Doug and Rachel Limon wanted to have their new baby in a cradleboard, but had difficulty finding anyone in the community that could help teach them to make one. After finding an elder in Leech Lake to help them, they had Gavino in the cradleboard.


Out & About: March 2015
Wednesday, March 11 2015
 
Written by Deanna StandingCloud,
Average user rating    (0 vote)

A Conversation with Eve, Winona and Louise

“Until we can trust our own hearts, we cannot have a revolution.”

Eve Ensler’s words permeated throughout the auditorium at the Women’s Club in Minneapolis on Feb. 17 as Honor the Earth, One Billion Rising and Women’s Congress partnered to organize a powerful discussion: Extreme Extraction and Violence Against Native women.

The conversation centered around the disregard for the planet and natural resources by major oil corporations and how it directly correlates to the violence experienced by Indigenous women in North and South America.

The panel conversation not only engaged those who attended but empowered every individual to action, because the issue of violence against Native women belongs to everyone. The evening was filled with revolutionary imagery, music, refreshments and good company.

extreme extraction and violence 2-web.jpg

extreme extraction and violence 1-web.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Top left: Chasity Brown performs a selection of her songs. (Photo by Deanna StandingCloud)

Top right: Winona LaDuke, Patina Park, Eve Ensler and Louise Erdrich deliver a powerful panel discussion about environmental justice and it's connection to violence against Indigenous women. (Photo by Deanna StandingCloud)

 


Celebrating local and Indigenous foods: Dinner on the Farm and the Sioux Chef
Friday, February 06 2015
 
Written by Ann Treacy, TC Daily Planet,
Average user rating    (0 vote)

dinner_2-web.jpgIt’s a good time to be a foodie. There are lots of food happenings around town, you just need to know where to look. Dinner on the Farm is a good place to start.

During the summer, Dinner on the Farm hosts chef-planned and prepared dinners on farms. They are fun family-friendly events that also often include good, local beer or wine. There’s special pricing for kids so please don’t tell the organizers, but I have seen my kid eat her weight in beef then wash is down with a gallon of strawberries and cream as she chases cows in the field at these events. The dinners are summer highlights. It’s a fun way to learn about a local farm (local may mean up to two hours from the Twin Cities), an emerging chef and often local breweries or other specialty food producers are included. The only way to find out about them is sign up. (Pssst – signing up is free!)

During the winter, Dinner on the Farm hosts Underground Dinner Parties – in art galleries, breweries, Tiki rooms, haunted houses and other fun places. These are less family friendly as they often have a higher level of alcohol content; they also involve a lot less driving. It’s a fun way to meet other foodies. (Be warned it’s not a place to pick up foodies since mingling is minimal and most folks come in groups but with a little effort and sometimes wine you get to meet the most interesting people!)

This last weekend the underground dinner turned to brunch at the Dogwood Coffee Roastery. I heard the coffee was amazing. I’m not a coffee drinker but I was introduced to Spruce Soda Ginger Beer drinker. I have been looking for something to replace Diet Coke; this is on the shortlist. It’s sweet but not syrupy or sugary. And it’s all natural.

The brunch included dry salamis from Red Table. I will forego bacon with brunch any and every there’s dry meats from Red Table on the buffet. Rise provided the bagels; they feature only locally grown and organic ingredients. Soft on the inside, a bite on the outside. Holds spreads and jams well!


<< Start < Prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Next > End >>

Results 1 - 9 of 106

Ads

03-16-15 - 05-15-15 college of st. scholastica.jpg

03-15 mmcd.jpg

03-15-angel tax.jpg 160x120_b.jpg

Sponsors

bald_eagle_erectors_web_size.jpglogo spot_color - copy.jpg 

pcl_leaders_web_size.jpg

api_supply_lifts_web_size.jpg

 

 

 

 

Login to The Circle

Not a member yet?
Create your free account.





Lost Password?
No account yet? Register
Register with The Circle News and submit your own stories. You report the latest!

Syndicate