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Urban News
Urban News
Wednesday, October 17 2012
 
Written by The Circle Staff,
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Getting Out The Native Vote

Native Vote Launches National Grass-roots Media Campaign
The National Congress of American Indians launched a national grassroots media campaign in September alongside leading national Native media organizations to encourage Native people to register to vote and participate in the 2012 national election.
The new campaign titled "Every Native Vote Counts" is part of the organization's ongoing non-partisan voter outreach effort, Native Vote. Native Vote works with community organizers, non-profits, urban Indian centers, tribal governments, and regional organizations to create a strong and permanent infrastructure for election training that highlights voter registration, election protection policies, and voter education.   
With a goal of turning out the largest Native vote in history in 2012 NCAI reached out to members of the media to participate in the campaign and hopes these critical partners are joined by many more in the coming weeks.
The Dakota War of 1862, refuges in Canada
Sunday, June 10 2012
 
Written by By Kathy Henderson,
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It is well known that in the aftermath of the U.S.-Dakota War of 1862 when the Dakota people were being rounded up and confined at Fort Snelling, some chiefs fled with their bands into the Dakota Territory and Canada. And in most history books, that's where the story ends - at the Canadian border.
But the often-overlooked story about what happened on the other side of the 49th parallel deserves telling, for it comes with ancient silver medals and an amazing account of refugee status based on oaths of perpetual obligation made to the Dakota people a half century before. As Minnesotans commemorate the 150th anniversary of the U.S.-Dakota War of 1862, it took a visit to the Manitoba Museum in Winnipeg, Manitoba Canada to spotlight this little-known chapter of Dakota history.
The sign in the museum's Grassland Gallery exhibit area simply states:  "Following the Sioux Uprising in Minnesota in 1862, many Dakota families moved north into British territory. In recognition of their longstanding allegiance to the British Crown, they were granted reserve lands beginning in 1874, although they did not sign treaties. By the mid-1870s, there were over 1,000 Dakota living in camps near Portage la Prairie, along the Assiniboine River, at Oak Leaf and near Fort Ellice."
What! Canadian Dakotas. Allegiance to the British Crown! How did all this happen?
The Dakota people have had a long history of crisscrossing the border and had at various times since 1821 established trading relationships with the Hudson Bay Company (HBC) at Fort Garry. Fort Garry was not a military post, but a fur trading post near the confluence of the Red and Assiniboine rivers, where Winnipeg, Manitoba, is located today.
However, this time the arrival of the Dakota at the fort was different. In the aftermath of the U.S.-Dakota War of 1862, the Dakotas came to Forth Garry as refugees, not trading partners, and they arrived with silver medals that displayed the image of King George III and claims to sanctuary based on promises made to their forefathers for their allegiance and service to the British during the War of 1812.
Running Wolf Fitness Center member loses 60 lbs, regains health
Sunday, June 10 2012
 
Written by by Connie Norman,
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We here at the Running Wolf Fitness Center would like to share one of our success stories with the community. Salvador Pacheco (White Earth Ojibwe/ Hispanic) lives and works in the Phillips neighborhood and heard we were re-opening the Running Wolf Fitness Center in the neighborhood. So in September he went to the Native American Community Clinic (NACC) and got his fitness exam, which entitled him to recieve a free 6 month membership at Running Wolf Fitness Center.
During the exam Salvador learned that he had a high total cholesterol of 236. He determined to set goals to improve that through dietary change. Several of the changes he made included cutting butter from his diet and eating high fiber oatmeal.  Pacheco said the toughest part of the diet change was giving up Pepsi.
After changing his diet and working with a NACC Dietician his cholesterol went down 100 points in about 6-8 weeks.
Salvador started his membership at Running Wolf Fitness Center November 1st. He came every morning at 10 am when Running Wolf opened and set goals with the trainer named Q. When he started Salvador said that he could only do about 5 minutes on the Nustep (Recumbent bike).
Campaign launched to address abysmal Indian attendance rates
Thursday, May 17 2012
 
Written by By Alleen Brown,
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When Roxanne Broden's daughter started school, Broden didn't understand how important the first years are. It was just kindergarten, what was the big deal if her daughter missed some days? Broden was young herself, she had her daughter when she was a teen. Now her kid is older, and she worries that those early absences will impact her girl's academic future.
Last year, only 34 percent of American Indian students in Minneapolis attended school 95 percent of the time or better, missing fewer than nine days. That's less than any other demographic. At the mostly Indian Anishinabe Academy only 27 percent met that benchmark.
Olympic gold medalist Billy Mills talks life lessons to Native students
Sunday, February 19 2012
 
Written by The Circle Staf,
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billy_mills_1.jpgOlympic gold medalist Billy Mills spoke on Jan. 13 to  Native American youth in grades 6-12 during Native American Youth Day at Hoversten Chapel, Foss Center at Augsburg College.
Billy Mills, also known as Makata Taka Hela, is the second Native American to win an Olympic gold medal. He won in the 10,000 meter race at the 1964 Tokyo Olympics. He is still the only American to ever win an Olympic gold medal in this event. His 1964 victory is considered one of the greatest Olympic upsets. A former United States Marine, Mills is a member of the Oglala Lakota (Sioux) Tribe.
billy_mills_2.jpgAbout 250 students from a number of metropolitan school districts attended the event, including students from Minneapolis, St. Paul, Robbinsdale, Anoka, Centennial, Osseo and others.
During his presentation Mills shared lessons he has learned throughout his life. He interwove those lessons with stories from his personal life, including about growing up an orphan by age 12, going to Haskell Indian Boarding School, being in the U.S. Marines, training for and competing in the 1964 Olympics, and from his extensive world travels.
Four key lessons Mills shared with the students included:
o It is the journey, not the destination, that shapes our lives.
o Life is choreographed by the daily decisions we make.
o billy_mills_3.jpgOne of the greatest challenges we face is overcoming perceptions we hold of others, and overcoming perceptions others hold of us.
o A true sense of unity with others can emerge from connecting to diverse peoples from throughout the globe.
oPracticing the values of traditional Lakota ways - bravery, fortitude, wisdom and generosity - can help you achieve your dreams, and can heal a broken spirit.

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