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DNR confiscates nets, fish from Dakota activists on Cedar Lake
Friday, June 10 2011
 
Written by By Rupa Shenoy and Laura Yuen Minnesota Public Radio News,
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Conservation officers with the Department of Natural Resources (DNR) seized a gill net and several dozen fish on May 13 from a small group of Dakota Indian activists at Cedar Lake in Minneapolis.
The group was fishing on Cedar Lake one day before the walleye opener to draw attention to an 1805 U.S. treaty that they say gives them the right to fish in Twin Cities lakes regardless of state law. The activists are hoping to push the case into court. No arrests were made, but DNR conservation officers took the names of at least six people and will forward them to the Hennepin County attorney's office for possible charges. Dozens of Dakota Indians and their allies gathered on the beach of the urban lake. They cast a gill net and caught nearly 60 fish in all - including sunfish, crappies and walleye.
Capt. Greg Salo manages enforcement of the Twin Cities metro area for the DNR and said the fish will probably be frozen as evidence. Salo said the DNR will forward a report, including the names of the six individuals who were tending the gill net, to the the Hennepin County Attorney's office for possible charges.
"But I think this is probably going to go on for a while," Salo said. "Anytime you deal with treaty rights, it's not black and white, cut and dried."
In 1805, young army officer Zebulon Pike negotiated a deal that allowed the United States to set up a military post in what is now the Twin Cities. In return Pike gave the Dakota presents and whiskey and promised them free use of the land.
First Lady launches Let's Move! In Indian Country Initiative
Friday, June 10 2011
 
Written by Associated Press,
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First Lady Michelle Obama launched the Let's Move! In Indian Country (LMIC) Initiative at the Menominee Nation in Keshena, Wisconsin on May 25.  The initiative will support and advance the work that tribal leaders and community members are already doing to improve the health of American Indian and Alaska Native children.
LMIC will bring together federal agencies, communities, nonprofits, corporate partners, and tribes with the goal of ending childhood obesity in Indian Country within a generation.
First lady Michelle Obama sent top federal officials to the Menominee Indian reservation in Keshena to launch a specially targeted "Let's Move! in Indian Country" initiative to help Native children who statistically are twice as likely to be overweight as the general population.
SPPS Students In Top 10%
Thursday, May 12 2011
 
Written by by Jacob Croonenberghs,
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SPPS_studentsThree of the six high schools in St. Paul have a Native student in the top 10 percentile.

The American Indian Education Program for the Saint Paul Public Schools (SPPS) has three Native students that are in the top 10% of academic achievement at their high schools.
The students who made the honor roll are: Virginia Godfrey, from Como Senior High School (ranked number 15 out of 373 students); Brook LaFloe, a Johnson High Senior (ranked 13 out of 359 students); and Kyle Reiter, a senior at Harding High School (ranked 3 out of 541 students). The students will all be graduating this year and have plans for post-secondary education. LaFloe (Turtle Mountain Ojibwe) has just been awarded a Gates Scholarship, and Reiter (Michigan Ojibwe) has recieved the Horatio Alger scholarship.
TGIFriday will hold first poetry reading since inception
Tuesday, May 10 2011
 
Written by by Jacob Croonenberghs,
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TGIfriday will hold first poetry reading storyThe Loft-sponsored open writing group, TGIFrybread, will be presenting Minwaajimo (She/He is Telling a Good Story), a public reading at The Loft Literary Center on May 21, from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m.
An event over three years in the making, Minwaajimo will be the culmination of efforts by local Native writers to create an event that celebrates the creativity of Native poems, stories, and other works.
Ardie Medina (Lac du Flambeau Ojibwe) an Associate Development Director at The Loft, hosts the open writing group once a month. TGIFrybread, first formed in 2008, stemmed from an event at The Moonlit Bridge gala. The Loft was sponsoring a table for INROADS scholarship opportunities when a number of prominent writers from the area, including poet and essayist Heid Erdrich, met together at the table and began discussing ways in which writers could begin collaboration on their efforts.
"We thought, 'we have to start getting together on a more regular basis,'" Medina said. "Writers writing together. That is what eventually would become TGIFrybread."
TGIFrybread would grow over the years, bringing in talented Native artists and helping them to foster their writing skills, their presentation, and ultimately helping participants to take their own work seriously.
Dakota shirt returns home after 300 years
Tuesday, May 10 2011
 
Written by by Marianne Combs , Minnesota Public Radio,
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dakota shirt returns homeThe Minneapolis Institute of Arts (MIA) has just acquired a new Native American shirt, and in doing so has returned it to its homeland after an absence of more than 300 years.
"It does not get any better than this, it's amazing," said curator Joe Horse Capture. "This is one of the earliest Native American objects from what we now know as Minnesota that exists. There's no other shirt like this anywhere," says Horse Capture. "But it's not in Europe, it's not in Brooklyn, it's right here at home. So if you're from the local Native American community, you can now see something created by one of your ancestors - something older than the United States of America - right here at the MIA."
While the details of the shirt's history are a little fuzzy, Horse Capture thinks he has a good idea of what happened to it. "At one point when this whole area was known as New France," explains Horse Capture. "The royalty back home in France heard about Native Americans and their culture, and asked explorers to bring examples back with them."
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