Urban News
NACC Weight Loss Challenge participants lose 610 lbs.
Saturday, August 13 2011
Written by Andrea Cornelius,
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nacc weight loss winner.jpgThis past April over 200 participants of all ages entered a 12 week weight loss challenge at the Native American Community Clinic (NACC) in Minneapolis. The person who lost the most weight would win a grand prize of $500.00, provided by Ucare. Enrollment only cost $1.00 (all of which went towards the second place prize) and anyone was able to participate whether you were a patient at NACC or not. Participants kept food journals, counted calories, exercised regularly and weighed in weekly.
Shannon Fahey, a registered dietician at NACC, worked one on one each week with participants on goal-setting, exercise routines, and nutrition information - after evaluating their food journals at the weigh-ins.
Although the weigh-ins were held weekly, Fahey and staff were available anytime participants needed, thereby creating a highly individualized program.
A collective total of 610 pounds were lost at the end of the program, which ended in June 29. Kasa Hohenstein was the first place winner, having lost 16% of her body weight. James Seals came in second place, having lost 13% of his body weight. Participants lost between 8-15 pounds, making an average loss of 5.7% of body weight in total.
Gibbs House Teaches Dakota Language
Friday, July 08 2011
Written by Jacob Croonenberghs,
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gibbs_house_teachers_dakota.jpghe Gibbs Museum hosted a their first Dakota Language camp for youth grades 1st through 4th this summer from June 27th to July 1st. During the week-long camp students enjoyed seasonal themes as they learned about the life of the Dakota people who walked the trails of the museum's grounds, and were introduced to a language that is not usually taught at elementary school levels.
The Gibbs Museum was opened in 1954 under the Ramsey County Historical Society (RCHS). Listed in 1974 under the National Register of Historic Places, the museum has worked closely with the University of Minnesota's Dakota language program.
Located next to the University's soccer fields, The Gibbs Museum is a picture of 19th century life. There are traditional Dakota bark lodges and tipis at the site, as well as the excavated sod house, or 'soddy' that Jane and Heman Gibbs lived in. The area is covered by prairie grasses, and native crops such as corn, squash, and beans dot the fields.
"This museum focuses on place history," said Terry Swanson, a historian who has worked with the Gibbs Museum for five years. "When Priscilla Farnham (RCHS Executive Director) came to this site, we weren't really telling the story of Jane Gibbs. After studying the history of this place, she thought we needed to focus on how important the people and the history of this land they lived on really were. I think that's at the heart of what we do here."
The story of the Gibbs museum began in 1835, when Jane DeBow (eventually Jane Gibbs) moved west with a missionary and his wife. They settled near Lake Calhoun, where there was a band of Dakota living on the shores of the lake. The settlement she grew up in was Cloud Man's village.
Ethnic Cultural Tourism Conference to be held in July
Friday, July 08 2011
Written by Art CoulsonSeveral organizations focused on promoting tourism in the American Indian community and i,
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Several organizations focused on promoting tourism in the American Indian community and in other communities of color will gather with their colleagues from around the state at Black Bear Crossings on the Lake for the inaugural Ethnic Cultural Tourism Destinations (ECTD) Conference.
The conference, which will be held  on July 13 from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. at Black Bear Crossings, 1360 North Lexington Parkway, St. Paul, will feature a mix of local and nationally known speakers on topics that are applicable to any community.
Among the planners of this conference were David Glass, of Black Bear Crossings and the American Indian Economic Development Fund, and Janice LaFloe of the American Indian Family Center.
"We had great participation from the local American Indian community," said Lisa Tabor, organizer of the conference and executive director of CultureBrokers Foundation. 
The conference is being planned by the ECTD Collaborative, a group of community developers, tourism professionals, businesses, residents, agencies and elected officials working together to capitalize and leverage St. Paul's ethnic cultural assets for the economic benefit of ethnic populations. Through promotion of cultural tourism as an economic development tool, the conference will help people capitalize on local assets while expanding their economies through new visitors to their neighborhoods.
Wild Rice In Danger
Friday, June 10 2011
Written by Jacob Croonenberghs,
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cover story wild rice in danger.jpgProposed sulfide limit increases
in Minnesota's lakes would
endanger natural wild rice growth.

At the State Capitol, Governor Mark Dayton vetoed legislation that, among other measures, would have threatened the growth of wild rice on Minnesota's lakes and rivers. For weeks, debate on the budget had been stalling an omnibus environmental, energy, and natural resource financing bill named HF 1010. The legislation proposed budget cuts across the board, which would have affected the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources (MDNR) in such areas as staff levels, salaries of state employees, and reduction of water quality tests for Minnesota's lakes.
One particular amendment to the bill concerned the treatment of wild rice that grows naturally in Minnesota. The bill called for increasing the sulfide limit in Minnesota's bodies of water, endangering natural wild rice growth and threatening the way of life for many in Northern Minnesota.
Opposition to the bill begun at the grass-roots level. An open member group, Protect our Manoomin, speaks against the dangers of tampering with the delicate balance of wild rice stands, the beds harvested on the lakes of Northern Minnesota. The group has organized protests and rallies to bring attention to the issue, and has allied itself with other organizations concerned about the well-being of Minnesota's lakes and their ecosystems.
World Peace and Prayer Day
Friday, June 10 2011
Written by The Circle Staff,
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World Peace and Prayer Day (WPPD) will once again bring people of all faiths and spiritual beliefs together to pray for healing for Mother Earth. World Peace and Prayer Day began on June 21, 1996 to bring attention to the earth's need for healing. It has evolved into a honoring of sacred sites around the world.
WPPD will take place June 18-21 at Fort Snellling and around the Mendota area. A Sacred Horse Ride will begin June 6th at Pickerel Lake in South Dakota and will arrive at the ancient site of Bdote near Mendota, Minnesota.
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