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National Briefs


NCAI RESPONDS TO HUCKABEE'S ANNOUNCEMENT GAFFE
Thursday, May 07 2015
 
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brian_cladoosby-ncai-bw-web.jpgWASHINGTON, D.C. – Former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee's comparisons of Islamic terrorism to the cowboys and Indians stereotype drew fire from the National Congress of American Indians on May 7.

In his presidential run announcement on May 5, Huckabee said, “When I hear our current president say he wants Christians to get off their high horse so we can make nice with radical jihadists, I wonder if he can watch a western from the ‘50s and be able to figure out who the good guys and the bad guys really are.”

NCAI President Brian Cladoosby released the following response in reaction to Governor Mike Huckabee’s quote: “This week I learned about Governor Huckabee’s speech announcing his candidacy for U.S. President and was dismayed to hear him compare Native Americans to jihadists.”

“There are many things we have left behind from the 1950’s, including overt racism and sexism. We hope that the old trope of the Indians as the bad guys in Western movies is also left behind. It is hurtful when public officials use stereotypes of Indians as the 'bad guys.' Even if it is a metaphorical expression, racial stereotypes should be avoided. It is particularly hurtful to suggest that Americans should reflexively identify images of Native people defending our homelands as the 'bad guys.'”


National Briefs: May 2015
Monday, May 04 2015
 
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OBAMA INVITES NATIVE YOUTH TO WHITE HOUSE ON JULY 9

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. – President Barack Obama reached out to Native youth on April 25, inviting them the first-ever White House Tribal Youth Gathering this summer.

In a video message delivered to the 32rd annual Gathering of Nations powwow in New Mexico, Obama said he was inspired by the youth he and First Lady Michelle Obama met during their visit to the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe in June 2014. The historic trip was his first to Indian Country as president.

"Their resilience, pride and optimism in the face of incredible obstacles moved us deeply," Obama said of the youth from the reservation, whom he later invited to Washington, D.C., in November. "I know that many Native youth share the same experiences."

Obama is hoping that same spirit will return to the nation's capital on July 9, when his administration hosts the inaugural Native youth event. He urged powwow participants to join Generation Indigenous and engage their communities through the Youth Challenge. Applications are due May 8 so Native youth only have two more weeks to complete the challenge. The conference is open to Native youth ages 14-24 from "rural or urban communities," the White House said.

The goal is to select some 800 Native youth to attend the gathering, whose theme is "Two Worlds, One Future: Defining Our Own Success." The event will be held at the Renaissance Downtown Hotel.

The youth will meet with administration officials and the White House Council on Native American Affairs, an inter-agency body chaired by Interior Secretary Sally Jewell. Additional details will be shared as the event approaches, so it's likely the conference will also include a visit to the White House by some participants.

Although Obama wasn't at the powwow, two representatives of the White House were there – Raina Thiele, who is Alaska Native, and Jodi Gillette, a member of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe. Thiele works in the Office of Intergovernmental Affairs and Gillette serves as the president's senior advisor for Native American Affairs.


National Briefs: April 2015
Thursday, April 02 2015
 
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NAVAJO TEEN'S SHORT FILM HOSTED AT THE WHITE HOUSE

WASHINGTON, D.C. – Navajo student Keanu Jones was selected as one of 15 young filmmakers across the country to participate in the second annual White House Student Film Festival.

Jones, an 18 year-old senior at Flagstaff Arts and Leadership Academy, said he hopes his three-minute film on his family’s daily struggles helps raise awareness about the fight for water and other natural resources taken from reservations.

The American Film Institute helped select the videos, which were on the theme of “the impact of giving back.” Students behind the 15 winning films, some as young as age 6, were at the White House on March 24 where they got to screen their movies for an East Room audience of filmmakers and celebrities, including Steve McQueen, the Oscar-nominated director behind “12 Years a Slave,” and Academy Award-winning actress Hillary Swank.

“These aren’t just great films, but they’re a great example of how young people are making a difference all around the world,” Obama said to applause from the audience.

Obama used the event to unveil his “Call to Arts” initiative through the Corporation for National and Community Service to help inspire and mentor young artists across the country. The program will work with the American Film Institute, the Screen Actors Guild and the American Federation of Television and Radio Artists, whose members have pledged to provide 1 million hours of mentorship to young artists over the next three years.

Keanu’s film, “Giving back the Navajo Way,” told of the Navajo tradition of serving elders despite the sometimes-arduous work needed to do so in Indian Country. Keanu said “simple necessities Americans enjoy like electricity, automatic heaters and running water” may be non-existent in the rural area of Arizona where he is from.

“I’ve never really thought that making a simple three-minute film would even take me to the White House or to see Obama,” Keanu said.

 

HO-CHUNK NATION RAISES MINIMUM WAGE TO $2.75 ABOVE FEDERAL

MADISON, Wis. – The Ho-Chunk Nation of Wisconsin has raised its minimum wage to $10 an hour.

The amount is $2.75 above the federal level. It will go into effect in July.

“The cost is high but the return is much greater,” President Jon Greendeer said in a statement. “We can wait until the perpetual debate is resolved or we can just take action ourselves. We chose to make our move and I feel it’s the right one.”

 

 
National Briefs: March 2015
Wednesday, March 11 2015
 
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SENATE FAILS TO OVERRIDE KEYSTONE XL VETO

WASHINGTON, D.C. – The U.S. Senate failed on March 4 to override President Barack Obama's veto of legislation approving the Keystone XL oil pipeline, leaving the controversial project to await an administration decision on whether to permit or deny it.

The Senate mustered just 62 votes in favor of overriding the veto, short of the two-thirds needed. Thirty-seven senators voted to sustain Obama's veto. The Senate action means the House of Representatives will not vote on override. Sen. John Hoeven (R-N.D.) said pipeline backers will try again to force Obama's hand, by attaching Keystone approval to another bill this year.

The proposed TransCanada pipeline would carry 830,000 barrels a day of mostly Canadian oil sands crude through Montana and South Dakota to Nebraska, en route to refineries and ports along the U.S. Gulf Coast. It has been pending for more than six years over the objection of tribes, landowners and environmental activists.

Republicans support building the pipeline, saying it would create jobs. Obama questioned Keystone XL's employment impact and raised concerns about its effects on climate change.

Obama last month vetoed the bill authorizing the pipeline's construction, saying it had bypassed a final State Department assessment on whether the project would benefit the United States. The department is handling the approval process because the pipeline would cross the U.S.-Canadian border.

Once that State Department assessment is in, expected in the coming weeks or months, Obama is expected to make a final decision on permitting for the project.


OGLALA SIOUX TRIBE WANTS TOURNAMENT MOVED OUT OF RAPID CITY

PINE RIDGE, S.D. – Leaders of the Oglala Sioux Tribe are asking the Lakota Nation Invitational board of directors to move the popular event out of Rapid City, S.D.

Tribal leaders are upset by an incident, in which 57 students from the American Horse School on the reservation were allegedly had beer poured on them and racial slurs made about them by white patrons at a Rapid City Rush hockey game last month. They also believe city authorities have not handled the situation well, which resulted in only one misdemeanor of disorderly conduct charge against one person.

Bryan Brewer, a former OST president, founded LNI in 1977 and still sits on the board of directors, he believes leaving Rapid City isn't the right response to the controversy.

But current tribal leaders say they will encourage the tribe and its citizens to boycott LNI if it takes place in Rapid City this December. The tournament, which injects $5 to $6 million into the city's economy, is held at the Rushmore Plaza Civic Center, the venue where the children were victimized.

 


'Drunktown's Finest' set for theaters nationwide
Tuesday, February 10 2015
 
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drunktowns_finest-web.jpgALBUQUERQUE, N.M. — “Drunktown’s Finest,” a film by Navajo filmmaker Sydney Freeland, will be released to theaters across the country this spring.

According to a press release, the film’s executive producer Robert Redford will present the film in New York City at the Quad Cinema on Feb. 20 and in Los Angeles at the Arena Cinema on Feb. 27 and in the following weeks to select markets across the nation.

"Drunktown's Finest" premiered at the 2014 Sundance Film Festival and has since won a number of awards, including the Grand Jury Prize for Best Dramatic Narrative and HBO Best First Feature awards at Outfest 2014, as well as Best Film at the American Indian Film Festival in San Francisco. The film has screened at over 50 film festivals around the world, hailed by Twitch as “a compelling snapshot of contemporary Navajo life.” Filmmaker Magazine lauded Navajo writer/director Freeland for her “authentic voice.”

The film follows three young Navajo — a college-bound Christian girl raised by white parents, a rebellious and lost father-to-be and an aspiring transgender model — as they struggle to escape the hardships of life on the reservation. As the three find their lives becoming more complicated and their troubles growing, their paths begin to intersect. With little in common other than a shared heritage, they soon learn that the key to overcoming their obstacles may come from the most unlikely of sources, each other.

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