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Youth from the Twin Cities Native American Lacrosse Club, parents and admirers welcomed the MN Swarm's new Onondaga player Read more ...

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Photography helps Native youth enrich their lives

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Militarizing Fossil Fuels and Guarding the Pipeline
Wednesday, July 31 2013
 
Written by By Winona LaDuke with Frank Molley,
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militarizing_fossil_fuels.jpg Someone needs to explain to me why wanting clean drinking water makes you an activist, and why proposing to destroy water with chemical warfare doesn’t make a corporation a terrorist.

I was in South Dakota in late June, which is sort of a ground zero for the XL Keystone Pipeline – the pipeline owned by a Canadian Corporation which will export tar sands oil to the rest of the world. This is the heart of the North American continent. Bwaan Akiing is what we call this land – Land of the Lakota. There are no pipelines across it, and beneath it is the Oglalla Aquifer wherein lies the vast majority of the water for this region. The Lakota understand that water is life, and that there is no new water.

Tar sands carrying pipelines (otherwise called “dilbit”) are sixteen times more likely to break than a conventional pipeline, and it seems that some ranchers and Native people – in a new Cowboy and Indian Alliance – are intent upon protecting that water.

AICDC Buys Ancient Traders Market
Wednesday, July 31 2013
 
Written by By Jamie Keith,
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aicdc_buys_ancient_traders.jpgThe American Indian Community Development Corporation (AICDC) acquired Ancient Traders Market from its most recent owner, the Twin Cities branch of the Local Initiatives Support Corporation (LISC) on May 31. The $2.2 million purchase was part of a multi-year plan and partnership between the two organizations to reestablish Native ownership of the building and support further community and economic developments in Minneapolis’s Phillips Neighborhood.

“It really is an important acquisition for us as it relates to the American Indian Cultural Corridor and the economic strength and vitality of the community,” said AICDC Chief Executive Officer Michael Goze.

AICDC’s role in such initiatives was outlined in the American Indian Community Blueprint, which was created by the Native American Community Development Institute in 2010. The Blueprint’s introduction states that the document “establishes a community-development framework for asset-based, solution-oriented strategies designed to advance American Indian interests and opportunities” in the Twin Cities.

What's New In The Community
Wednesday, July 31 2013
 
Written by The Circle Staff,
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whats_new_-_walfred_walking_bull.jpgWalking Bull joins The Circle staff
The Circle has hired a new Managing Editor. Alfred Walking Bull will start work July 1st and undergo a two month training period while he learns all aspects of running the monthly newspaper. Walking Bull comes from the Rosebud Sioux Tribe in South Dakota where he was the editor of the tribal newspaper, the Sicangu Eyapaha. Before that he was the Communications Consultant for the Native Youth Leadership Alliance, and a Field Organizer for the South Dakota Democratic Party. He also worked for the Argus Leader and for the Aberdeen American News. He attended the University of South Dakota. Walking Bull takes over the newspaper operations from long-time editor Cat Whipple who is stepping down after 13 years. Her last day will be August 31st.

National George Morrison exhibit opens
Wednesday, July 31 2013
 
Written by By Jamie Keith,
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The exhibition “Modern Spirit: The Art of George Morrison” began the first leg of its multi-year national tour this month at Plains Art Museum in Fargo, North Dakota. The exhibit contains eighty pieces of the prolific Ojibwe artist’s work, from paintings and drawings to multimedia sculptures and collages. “Modern Spirit: The Art of George Morrison” marks the first time a comprehensive collection of Morrison’s art has toured the United States.

The goals of the exhibition are to educate people across the country about Morrison’s work and contributions to the field of modern art as an Indigenous artist and teacher.

Ojibwe Language Camp draws over 1,000 participants
Wednesday, July 31 2013
 
Written by Photos by Ivy Vainio,
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language_camp_-_beading_quills.jpgThe Nagaajiwanaang Ojibwe language camp was held June 13-16 at the Kiwenz Campground in Sawyer, Minn. There were over 1,200 people registered for the camp this year, with some coming from as far away as Norway and Germany.  The language camp offered different activities including a canoe race, a mini powwow, moccasin making, birch bark basket making, flute making, tanning hides, canoe races, and other traditional Ojibwe cultural skills. This is the fifth year the language camp has been held. For the first time this year, Fond du Lac Transit provided rides for reservation residents. The camp was started by Jim and Pat Northrup.

Marjorie Anderson, first woman to lead Mille Lacs band, dies at 81
Wednesday, July 31 2013
 
Written by By Rupa Shenoy Minnesota Public Radio,
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marge_anderson_passes_on.jpgThe first woman to lead the Mille Lacs Band of Ojibwe in Minnesota has died. Marjorie Anderson died June 29 of natural causes, the band said. She was 81. Anderson served the tribe in east central Minnesota from 1991 to 2000. She was elected to another four-year term as chief executive in 2008. Anderson was head of the band when it successfully sued to retain hunting and fishing rights that were promised in 19th century treaties. Anderson was secretary-treasurer of the band before becoming chief executive. Tadd Johnson, who served as legal counsel for the band under Anderson, said the band adopted executive, legislative and judicial branches and separated business decisions from political ones. “A lot of those ideas were new to Indian Country in the 1980s when the band came up with them, and then Marge followed through. She was a great stickler for details and parliamentary procedure and following the rules,” Johnson, who heads the American Indian Studies Department at the University of Minnesota-Duluth, told MPR’s Morning Edition. Anderson received awards for her leadership in Indian gambling, tribal self-governance and tribal treaty rights. In the early 1990s she was a leader in the fight to gain tribal control of federal funds allocated for American Indians.
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