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A gag order on White Earth's Chairwoman on talking about reform efforts leads her to tell her side of the story.

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For Minnesota's American Indian Month, columnist and recent TEDx presenter Nick Metcalf writes about the realities of being Native in today's society.

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The Art of Resistance

Twin Cities Native community members come together for an evening of defining the Native experience through art.

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Bdote Charter School to Open in 2014
Monday, November 04 2013
 
Written by Laura Waterman Wittstock,
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The first new charter school to feature Dakota and Ojibwe language immersion will open will open in Fall 2014. Named Bdote Learning Center, with the prominent word “Bdote” that signifies the birth or origin place of the Dakota people where the Mississippi and Minnesota Rivers meet.

The new K-8 charter school was made possible by the Minnesota Department of Education’s approval and support of the charter school authorizer Innovative Quality Schools. The school’s board is on the fast track to make preparations for the first students in grades K-3. Although a site has not been selected, a search is underway in the Minneapolis area. In the interim, Bdote’s offices will be located at the Division of Indian Work in South Minneapolis. Grades K-3 will begin in 2014, to be followed with one grade per year to eighth grade in 2019.

Lacrosse Resurges As a Cultural Tradition
Monday, November 04 2013
 
Written by Art Coulson,
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Baaga’adowewag dagwaaging. They are playing lacrosse in the fall. lacrosse resurges as a cultural tradition.jpg

Clutching sticks and bouncing hard rubber balls off of walls, youth from reservation communities across Minnesota and Wisconsin gathered at Bemidji State University and at Bug-O-Nay Ge-Shig School at Leech Lake in early October for two days of lacrosse skills training. While there, the 50 or so young people and family members of all ages heard stories from a number of players and coaches about the deep and enduring connections of native people to the Creator’s Game.

The Minnesota Ojibwe Lacrosse league, founded by Bemidji High School basketball coach Dan Ninham, Oneida, is working with tribal communities to return the game of lacrosse to Native homelands. Lacrosse, played by Native peoples for thousands of years, is both one of the oldest games in America and the fastest growing.

The Youth Lacrosse Skills Camps are free and open to all K-12 students, thanks to sponsors such as the National Indian Gaming Association, Leech Lake Band of Ojibwe, BSU American Indian Resource Center, Minnesota Ojibwe Lacrosse and Paul Bunyan Broadcasting.

From the Editor's Desk: Again We Speak Against Injustice
Monday, November 04 2013
 
Written by Alfred Walking Bull, The Circle Managing Editor,
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from_the_editors_desk_alfred_walking_bull.jpg“Ake” is a word we use in Lakota to express our frustration. It's translated as “again.” Growing up on the Rosebud reservation, I would hear my parents say, “Ake!” when someone unnecessarily repeated themselves, made another promise that may have been suspect or when another frustration took hold in the family or in the community.

Again, we find ourselves discussing the issue of Native American mascots in the American mainstream. Again, we find ourselves having to explain to non-Native people why this is not just a demoralizing but dehumanizing issue for our people. And again, we find ourselves listening to the same ignorance involved with the caricaturization of a minority group of people.

The Washington D.C. team will play the Minnesota Vikings on Nov. 7 and the Native community in Minneapolis, led by the perennially-outspoken American Indian Movement, will protest the Washington team. In fact, the team was met by a similar protest in Denver on Oct. 27.

Again, the fans of the Washington team were effectively amoral when they saw the protests against the name, regurgitating the ignorance with phrases like, “Get over it,” or “We're honoring you.” And again, they are dead wrong.

Native Women Cultivate Leadership Skills
Monday, October 07 2013
 
Written by Alfred Walking Bull,
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Being of service to tribal communities both in the Twin Cities area and in the reservation environment is a priority for the three Native women who will be graduating from Native Americans in Philanthopy’s Circle of Leadership Academy in November. The organization selected a nation cohort of tribal citizens from around the country during its April 2012 Native Philanthropy Institute in Los Angeles. Among those selected were four women from the Minneapolis-St. Paul area who work in the Native community in various positions and organizations. Leslie Apple (Oglala Lakota), Alicia Smith (Yupik), Deanna Standing Cloud (Red Lake Ojibwe) and Anna Ross (Turtle Mountain Ojibwe) were selected for the 18-month program based on their individual goals and projects to improve their community through their own leadership development in philanthropic and non-profit sectors.
Rybak Addresses Achievement Gap for Native Students
Monday, October 07 2013
 
Written by Andrea Cornelius,
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“We've got to act like this is a crisis because it is,” Mayor R.T. Rybak said of the achievement gap, at the beginning of a roundtable discussion about Indian education at the Minneapolis American Indian Center on Aug. 26.

The auditorium at the Minneapolis American Indian Center was full of educators, parents and community members representing such organizations as Division of Indian Work (DIW) and others, who all came with concerns, questions and opinions on ways schools can help more Native American children succeed.

Mayoral Candidates Speak on the Step-Up program for youth
Monday, October 07 2013
 
Written by Brianna Skildum,
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Step-Up is a local summer program that introduces teens to temporary employment and prepares them for future careers. It runs 9 weeks, not including the courses that must be attended before hand. The students are educated about resumes, dress codes, attitudes, bills, pay rates, credit cards, banking, checking, necessary job skills, among other skills. At the start of the summer, students pick out a job and are on the road to cultivating life skills and a stipend of at least $1,000.
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