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From the Editor's Desk: Again We Speak Against Injustice
Monday, November 04 2013
 
Written by Alfred Walking Bull, The Circle Managing Editor,
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from_the_editors_desk_alfred_walking_bull.jpg“Ake” is a word we use in Lakota to express our frustration. It's translated as “again.” Growing up on the Rosebud reservation, I would hear my parents say, “Ake!” when someone unnecessarily repeated themselves, made another promise that may have been suspect or when another frustration took hold in the family or in the community.

Again, we find ourselves discussing the issue of Native American mascots in the American mainstream. Again, we find ourselves having to explain to non-Native people why this is not just a demoralizing but dehumanizing issue for our people. And again, we find ourselves listening to the same ignorance involved with the caricaturization of a minority group of people.

The Washington D.C. team will play the Minnesota Vikings on Nov. 7 and the Native community in Minneapolis, led by the perennially-outspoken American Indian Movement, will protest the Washington team. In fact, the team was met by a similar protest in Denver on Oct. 27.

Again, the fans of the Washington team were effectively amoral when they saw the protests against the name, regurgitating the ignorance with phrases like, “Get over it,” or “We're honoring you.” And again, they are dead wrong.

Native Women Cultivate Leadership Skills
Monday, October 07 2013
 
Written by Alfred Walking Bull,
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Being of service to tribal communities both in the Twin Cities area and in the reservation environment is a priority for the three Native women who will be graduating from Native Americans in Philanthopy’s Circle of Leadership Academy in November. The organization selected a nation cohort of tribal citizens from around the country during its April 2012 Native Philanthropy Institute in Los Angeles. Among those selected were four women from the Minneapolis-St. Paul area who work in the Native community in various positions and organizations. Leslie Apple (Oglala Lakota), Alicia Smith (Yupik), Deanna Standing Cloud (Red Lake Ojibwe) and Anna Ross (Turtle Mountain Ojibwe) were selected for the 18-month program based on their individual goals and projects to improve their community through their own leadership development in philanthropic and non-profit sectors.
Rybak Addresses Achievement Gap for Native Students
Monday, October 07 2013
 
Written by Andrea Cornelius,
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“We've got to act like this is a crisis because it is,” Mayor R.T. Rybak said of the achievement gap, at the beginning of a roundtable discussion about Indian education at the Minneapolis American Indian Center on Aug. 26.

The auditorium at the Minneapolis American Indian Center was full of educators, parents and community members representing such organizations as Division of Indian Work (DIW) and others, who all came with concerns, questions and opinions on ways schools can help more Native American children succeed.

Mayoral Candidates Speak on the Step-Up program for youth
Monday, October 07 2013
 
Written by Brianna Skildum,
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Step-Up is a local summer program that introduces teens to temporary employment and prepares them for future careers. It runs 9 weeks, not including the courses that must be attended before hand. The students are educated about resumes, dress codes, attitudes, bills, pay rates, credit cards, banking, checking, necessary job skills, among other skills. At the start of the summer, students pick out a job and are on the road to cultivating life skills and a stipend of at least $1,000.
Schimmel Sisters Visit Red Lake
Monday, October 07 2013
 
Written by Alfred Walking Bull,
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Beaming with excitement waiting for the Schimmel sisters to come to Red Lake High School gym sits Amber McNeal and her sister Diane. With a big smile on her face Amber says, “Guess What? Last season I told my mom I would be so excited if they ever came to Red Lake to show me some basketball moves and I could get their autograph, and it came true!” Amber McNeal is ten years old and in the 5th grade at Red Lake Elementary where she plays on the basketball team. Amber had her wish come true that Jude and Shoni Schimmel (Umatilla Tribe) would visit Red Lake.
GED Grad Poised for Success
Thursday, September 05 2013
 
Written by Alfred Walking Bull,
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ged grad poised for success eugene needham grayeagle copy.jpgWith recent high school graduation rates in the Native American community in the Twin Cities hovering between 21 and 44 percent, the obstacles seem daunting for students hoping to make a future for themselves in the urban setting. The American Indian Opportunities Industrialization Center’s (AIOIC) Adult Basic Education/GED program helps students achieve academically and professionally.

AIOIC was created in 1979 to respond to high unemployment and poverty rates among Native Americans in the Twin Cities area. In addition to its ABE/GED component, it operates the Takoda Institute that educates students in business, health care and information technology. Its focus is to meld education and job training in a way that is both culturally appropriate and prepares its graduates for a successful transition into a life of achievement.

One of those AIOIC success stories is Eugene Needham-Grayeagle (Standing Rock Sioux Tribe). Born in St. Paul and having moved to Minneapolis at the age of three years-old, his story is a familiar one for Native Americans. “Like a lot of young, Native men going to high school, I started off at South High School. And being young and dumb, messing around with the wrong crowd, I fell back on the classwork and everything,” said Needham-Grayeagle.
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