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Fond du Lac Follies
Wednesday, November 21 2012
 
Written by by Jim Northrup,
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I was 19 years old.  I had been in the United States Marine Corps for a little over a year. I was a boot. Older Marines were telling me they had worn out more seabags than I had socks, they had more time in the air jumping off the back of six-by trucks than I had in the Corps. When they joined Christ was only a Corporal.
When I heard the order "Mount Out" I didn't know I was going to be taking part in an historical event.  
It was the Cuban Missile Crisis in 1962. I was a part of the 1st Marine Division and we quickly assembled and boarded ships in San Diego. There were 1200 Marines that boarded the USS Henrico, APA 45.  
We were prepared to invade Cuba to remove the Soviet missiles. The TV news said the missiles could reach all the way to Chicago.
We went south along Baja California headed for the Panama Canal. The weather got warmer the further south we traveled. As we sailed along more US Navy ships joined us and we all lined up to go through the Canal. As we were going through the locks and lakes of the Canal I learned it actually runs north and south. I saw jungle for the first time in my life.
Ted Charles, a Navajo friend, and I were two of the Marine infantry who were going to climb down the cargo nets into the little boats that would take us ashore. When the ramps dropped the Marines were going to come charging off the boats, shooting our rifles.
It ain't easy being indian
Wednesday, November 21 2012
 
Written by by Ricey Wild,
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This year the ungrateful, murderous pilgrims of yore will not be in my column. Yooz are welcome.
Personally I like the Thanksgiving holiday, just not how it mythically came to be. I like the "giving thanks" part of it which is done at least once a year by Turtle Island's immigrant descendants and every day by most Indians. By that I mean me, I have been experiencing very awful, painful days so often that I forget to pray and give thanks, but when I do put tobacco down I am always sure to give thanks for what the gifts I have. I always feel better when I do.
Weird things happen to me all the time. Get this; my good ole hoopdie is broken down. This happened a few days after I started back to work fulltime and after I was fired the first day back in the first 15 minutes. I was unfired the next day. Then I breathed a big gusty sigh of relief and gratefulness for the people who helped me. Yooz know who you are. I am thankful for wise, kind, intelligent people. (Good-lookin' too! Ayyy!)
MPS Superintendent Speaks
Wednesday, November 21 2012
 
Written by by Bernadeia H. Johnson, Ed.D. Superintendent of Schools,
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Dear MPS Partners and Friends,
Minneapolis Public Schools (MPS) is deeply grateful for and humbled by the overwhelming support that the citizens of Minneapolis have given the school district. We believe that this support demonstrates that the people of Minneapolis value our work and have confidence that we can make the improvements necessary to raise student achievement. One of our school district's sources of support and funding is the property tax levy.
MPS is committed to using its levy authority to meet the needs of present and future students and to only levy for what schools need. We are proposing a four percent increase in the school district levy, which would take effect for property taxes payable in 2013. The school district currently levies for about $165.7 million. The four percent increase would bring this amount to $172.4 million. The median Minneapolis home value is $171,000. If you own a home at that value, the school portion of your property taxes is expected to increase about $61 per year ($5 per month). The school board will vote on the increase in December.
Community calendar November 2012
Wednesday, November 21 2012
 
Written by The Circle Staf,
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Nov. 1 - 30
Leech Lake Tribal College Native American Heritage
The Leech Lake Tribal College will be hosting a variety of events throughout November to celebrate Native American month. All are free and open to the public. For info, see: www.llojibwe.com/ads/nov12Ad/
nativeHeritageMonth2012_poster.pdf or call 218-335-4220, or email to:
This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
o Nov. 1: OPEN MIC AFTERNOON - Come and share your talents with the college! You can do just about anything. 12-1 pm, Cedar Hall, Room 204.
o Nov. 5: NATIONHOOD SLIDESHOW - The Introduction to Anishinaabe Studies students will show a slideshow at Monday Drum Potluck displaying the 4 elements of nationhood for Leech Lake. 12-1 pm, Cedar Hall, Room 204.
o Nov. 8: LUNCH & LEARN - The Learning Center will be hosting a special Lunch & Learn presentation about topics related to NAHM. For more info, contact Stacie at 218-335-4242 or: This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it 12-1 pm, Cedar Hall, Room 204.
o Nov. 13: WILD RICE COOK OFF - Impress your fellow classmates and LLTC staff by making any Wild Rice Dish you would like! The 1st place winner will receive a gift card! 12-1 pm, Cedar Hall, Room 204.
o Nov. 15: STEM LUNCH & LEARN - The STEM Club will be hosting a special Lunch & Learn presentation about topics related to NAHM. For info, contact Fawn at 218- 335-4219 or: This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it 12-1 pm, Cedar Hall, Room 204.
o Nov. 15 & 16: SILENT AUCTION - Place you bid on fabulous arts and crafts. Items available range from jewelry to leatherwork. Sponsored by LLTC Student Senate.10 am-4 pm, Cedar Hall, Room 204.
o Nov. 20: BEADING/CRAFT HOUR - Bring your beadwork, arts & crafts, or any other items you would like to work on. This is your opportunity to share creative ideas with others as you work on your own projects. 12-1 pm, Cedar Hall, Room 204.
o Nov. 27: LEARN THE HANDGAME - Learn to play the handgame by alumni Tallie Large. One of the original games played by Native people. 12-1 pm, Cedar Hall, Rm 204.
o Nov. 28: INDIGENOUS FOODS - The Wellness Center will be hosting a special presentation about Traditional Indigenous Foods. For info, contact Dawn at 218- 335-4254 or: This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it 12-1 pm, Cedar Hall, Room 204.
o Nov. 29 & 30: ARTS & CRAFTS FAIR - Shop for gifts at the annual Arts & Crafts Fair featuring artists from the area. If you are interested in setting up a booth ($10 per day) contact Roselynn at 218-335-4211. 9-5 pm, Cedar Hall, Room 204.
o Every Tuesday: WELLNESS TALKING CIRCLE - Speak what is in your heart, come to share, or just listen. For info, contact Dawn Plumer at 218-335-4254. Led by Nancy Kingbird. Every Tues. at 12-1pm, CCE-Birch Building.
o Every Friday: OJIBWE STUDY GROUP - Study, learn, and practice Ojibwemowin. For more info, contact Bob at 218-335-4200 or email This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it Every Friday at 12-1 pm, Cedar Hall, Room 204.
Leonard (Robin) Alvin Stately Jr. Wiimitigoozens “little frenchman”
Wednesday, November 21 2012
 
Written by Jenny,
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passing_on_leonard_stately.jpgSeptember 22, 1952 - October 15, 2012.

Leonard (Robin) Alvin Stately Jr. Wiimitigoozens, age 60, of Redby, Minnesota journeyed to the Spirit World on Monday, October 15, 2012. He was born on September 22, 1952 in Red Lake to Leonard Alvin Stately Sr. and Vivian Frances Thunder. He was joined in marriage to Robyn Lynn Isham. They were marriaged by Native American custom for thirty six years. Leonard was a heavy equipment operator and teacher. He was a member of AIM. He was an avid hunter and fisher. He was a proud dad and grandfather. He liked spending time with his children and hunting with his sons. He liked going for rides around the horn, and he was known for driving slow around the community. He loved taking slow rides with the love of his life. He loved to make his babies smile. Survived by his wife Robyn Lynn Stately; sons: Robin John, Golden Eagle, Rain and Zachary Stately; daughters: Angel, Billie Jo, Rachelle, Leader, Bear, Sky, Antasia, Money and Terynn Stately, Star Taylor, an honorary daughter: Kathryn Fisher; thirty three grandchildren and seven great grandchildren; brothers: Guy and Bruce Stately, Theodore Graves, Gordon Johnson, Keith Defoe, Gary Thunder and Keith Lussier Sr.; sisters: Marlene Stately, Diane Roy, Tina Stately, Angela Hernandez and Suzanne Northbird; many other relatives and friends. Preceded in death by his mother and father: Vivian and Leonard Stately, brothers: David, Maurice and Alvin, an infant set of twins and numerous nieces and nephews. Funeral service for Leonard were held October 19 at The Redby Community Center in Redby, Minnesota. An all night wake was held October 17-18 at The Redby Community Center. Interment is at The Family Cemetery in Redby, Minnesota

MN VOICES | Robert Albee, diabetes activist
Tuesday, November 20 2012
 
Written by BY BERLINE PIERRE-LOUIS, TC DAILY PLANET,
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diabest_breakfast_story.jpgNovember 08, 2012
Robert Albee is a retired school teacher and Minneapolis resident who was diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes in 1995. I met Albee on a cold and rainy morning for a monthly Diabetes Breakfast in the culturally diverse Phillips neighborhood at the Phillips Community Center.
On that Thursday morning traffic all around the Twin Cities screeched to a very slow halt as the unexpected heavy rain came during rush hour. The rain was no deterrent to 35 participants who showed up to eat a hearty breakfast burrito bowl layered with beans, eggs, sausage, lettuce, fresh cilantro, tomato and a side of fresh apple slices.
Participants crowded around tables with hot coffee in hand to hear a psychologist and nurse practitioner from the Native American Community Clinic talk about diabetes and how it can affect their mental health. Topics at past breakfasts have included foot care, dental hygiene, and nutrition. The approach that Albee and his wife Sharon took in forming their two-year-old group, A Partnership of Diabetics (A-POD), is one of sharing in community with other diabetics. In addition to a monthly diabetes breakfast with speakers, A-POD holds weekly meet-up style groups. Each meeting starts with members recording their blood pressure and weight. During the meetings, members share their successes, struggles, and tips for better management of a sometimes very complex disease. Albee says about 100 people per month attend the breakfast and/or meet-up groups.
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