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Ricey Wild reflects on her mortality and her final wishes. When her time comes, she would like to be a tree.

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The Musical redefines masculinity

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It ain't easy being indian
Sunday, February 19 2012
 
Written by Ricey Wild,
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When I was a little brown kid the remedy for having skinned one's knee or other abrasions was to summon a neighborhood dog and have them lick the wound. Rather like Republican health care plans. It was said, I don't remember by whom, that dogs have cleaner mouths than humans and I in my ignorance went along with it. It was much later when I realized that dog's can also lick their hind ends and what is so antiseptic about that? Ick. I love my dog, The Mitz, but she knows to limit her puppy kisses to my ears. Every so often she sneaks in a kiss on my face but I worry more for her because of all the cosmetic products I apply there.
It occurs to me that I write like I'm an old, old woman telling stories about my youth like it was last century. Oh wait! It was last century. I don't ever want to be age seven or even 25 again, but what I do miss is my mobility and ease of movement. Oh, the long gone days of skipping, hopping, jumping and practicing for the Olympics by doing backbends and cartwheels! Alas! Alas!
Fond du Lac Follies
Sunday, February 19 2012
 
Written by Jim Northrup,
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A NOTICE to the Tuscon Unified School District.
I have checked your list of banned books and cannot find any of my titles there.  I am hoping some one can take care of this oversight.
My titles are:  1. Walking The Rez Road, 1993, Voyageur Press.  2. The Rez Road Follies, Canoes, Casinos, Computers, and Birch Bark Baskets, 1997 Kodansha Press, reprinted by the University of Minnesota Press.  3. Anishinaabe Syndicated, 2011, Minnesota Historical Society Press.  4. Rez Salute, due out Fall 2012, Fulcrum Publishing.  
Just for background information I have been writing the Fond du Lac Follies for newspapers for over 22 years.  I have written opinion pieces for other newspapers and have also written two plays.
I am Anishinaabe, a member of the Fond du Lac Band of Lake Superior Chippewa, Enrollment # 3166.  I live on the Fond du Lac Reservation established by the Treaty of 1854 in what is now called Minnesota.
My grandfather, Joseph A. Northrup, was also an author and I can't find his name on your list of banned books.  Among other materials he wrote a book called Wawina back in the 1930s. He was also a member of the Fond du Lac Band of Lake Superior Chippea.  Would you please consider banning his book also?

Native Issues in the Halls of Government
Sunday, February 19 2012
 
Written by Mordecai Specktor,
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Down the memory hole
Arizona became notorious in 2010, with the enactment of a punitive anti-immigrant law, SB 1070 – known as the Support Our Law Enforcement and Safe Neighborhoods Act. The law allows local police to question a person’s immigration status based on “reasonable suspicion,” if a person is stopped for another criminal violation. As I wrote in my July 2010 column, the law had been decried as an invitation to racial profiling; it was feared that Latinos, or anyone with brown skin, would become the targets of law enforcement authorities under the new law.

Dr. Annette Named CEO Of Blandin Foundation
Monday, January 09 2012
 
Written by Jacob Croonenberghs,
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dr_annette_named_ceo_of_blandin_foundation.jpgThis last December the Blandin Foundation held a banquet in honor of their new President and CEO Dr. Kathleen Annette. The arrival of Dr. Annette, a member of the White Earth Band of Ojibwe, as the executive head of the organization marks an important turning point in the organization's history.
Founded by Charles K. Blandin, the foundation has offered communities in Minnesota over 5,600 grants totalling $336 million in value in the nearly seventy years of its existence. Focused in the Grand Rapids area, the foundation seeks to build strong economies in rural Minnesota, and emphasizes the even distribution of benefits and burdens within the tight-knit communities which it serves.
Succeeding Jim Hoolihan, who left the position of CEO this last October, Dr. Annette  served on the Foundation's board from 1991 to 2003, and headed the Foundation's American Indian Advisory Committee since 2004.
Dr. Annette was the first woman from the Minnesota Ojibwe Nation to become a physician. She was also the first woman in the Bemidji Indian Health Service to serve as an area director. To her, responsibility and leadership are second nature.
"I started my practice years ago on the Leech Lake Reservation, and lived my entire life in northern rural Minnesota. What is different about people who live on the reservation? We have extra responsibility, is what I've always thought," Annette said.
Important to Dr. Annette is the leadership programs the foundation provides. Teaching and developing community leader's skill sets, and helping community leaders to work together towards a common goal are some of the values the foundation emphasizes through its leadership training.
Metro State students protest lack of Native classes offered in 2012
Monday, January 09 2012
 
Written by By Jacob Croonenberghs,
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metro-students-protest-native-classes-cut.jpgThis last December students of Metro State University held a protest rally to decry the lack of Native American Studies classes on their campus. Specifically, the students came together to protest the fact that two classes; 'American Indian Spirituality' and the class 'Genocide, Survival, and Recovery' were not being offered in the spring of 2012, the 150th anniversary of the War of 1862.
December 7th students gathered around the New Main building to hold a peaceful rally that included student speakers, professors, community leaders and representatives from the American Indian Movement (AIM).
One of the professors involved with the protest, Dr. Chris Nunpa, took the time to explain the grievances of the student body. "I had talked to the ethnic chair department, and told them these classes should be taught in the year 2012, in that it represents important years in the history of the Minnesota Dakota peoples as well as the state of Minnesota itself," Nunpa said.
Dr. Nunpa is a Professor of Native Studies, and would have been scheduled to teach the two classes at Metro State. When students learned that they would not be attending classes with Dr. Nunpa this semester, they sprung into action.
Students who helped to organize the event included Shannon Geshick, Zack Anderson, Matthew Sanchez, Keith Van Beek, and Di Roberge, among others. Word about the rally was spread through social media such as Facebook and Twitter, and the event attracted nearly a hundred protesters.
"Stop marginalizing Indigenous students, Indigenous professors, and Indigenous viewpoints! Create a Department of Indigenous Studies at Metro State!" one Facebook organization proclaimed.
WHATS NEW IN THE COMMUNITY:
Monday, January 09 2012
 
Written by The Circle Staff,
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MAICC honors community members at 25th Anniversary dinner
The Minnesota American Indian Chamber of Commerce (MAICC) celebrated 25 years of service at their Annual Dinner & Awards Banquet December 8, 2011 at the Mystic Lake Casino Hotel, Shakopee, MN. Highlights of the event included awards to American Indian organizations for outstanding contributions to their communities and a scholarship presentation to a American Indian student.
The annual awards dinner recognized the achievements of five American Indian businesses and community organizations. The honors included:
The Spirit of the People Award: Andy Arlotta, Co-Owner and Vice President of the Minnesota Swarm. For a variety of lacrosse programs that not only introduce youth to this traditional American Indian sport but also emphasize healthy life skills and the importance of education. 
The Turtle Award: Theresa Foster (White Earth Band of Ojibwe) Foster Mayers Associates, LLC. Foster was recognized for her volunteer time, energy and service work to support and promote the Minnesota American Indian Chamber of Commerce and its efforts to promote American Indian business. She is the owner of a Land Surveying and Wetlands Delineation firm in Minnesota.
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