subscribe_today.png

 

Citizen Journalism

Citizen JournalismCreate your free account and submit your own stories to The Circle website.Register for free and start publishing!

Article Guidelines

Watch the video to learn how!

Minnesota tribes press concerns over pipeline plan, wild rice
Monday, June 08 2015
 
Written by Dan Kraker, MPR News,
Average user rating    (0 vote)

mn_tribes_press_concerns_over_pipeline_plan_wild_rice-web.jpgSeveral Minnesota Indian bands are upset about what they say is a lack of consultation over a proposed controversial oil pipeline across northern Minnesota.

This week, the Mille Lacs and White Earth Ojibwe bands are holding their own public hearings on plans for the Sandpiper line, a $2.6 billion pipeline that would pump North Dakota crude 300 miles across Minnesota to its terminal in Superior, Wis., and eventually to refineries around the Great Lakes.

The tribal hearings are happening as the Minnesota Public Utilities Commission readies a major ruling on the project's need.

While the route preferred by Canadian pipeline company Enbridge Energy does not cross any Indian reservations, it does cross a large area of lakes and forests in northern Minnesota where treaties give tribes the right to hunt, fish and gather.

Tribal members say they are especially concerned about potential impacts on their right to gather wild rice. A three-hour meeting Enbridge hosted last week on the Fond du Lac Reservation was sometimes tense and emotional.

"If the wild rice dies, we die," said Michael Dahl, who drove four hours from the White Earth reservation to attend the meeting. "Shame on you," he shouted to Enbridge representatives.

Tanya Aubid, a Mille Lacs Band of Ojibwe member who lives near the Rice Lake National Wildlife Refuge near McGregor, Minn., broke down in tears as she talked about how a pipeline spill near Rice Lake would be devastating.

Ojibwe migration stories tell of how the people were told to keep moving until they came to a place where food grew on the water.

"Wild Rice is very much an integral part of our lives," she said. "It's there for us for our ceremonies, for basic daily living, and something we've had here for thousands and thousands of years."

Linda Coady, Enbridge's director of sustainability, told tribal members she'd relay their concerns to the company's senior leadership. While she didn't make any promises, Coady said she hopes Enbridge and tribes can forge a less adversarial relationship.

"There are very strong feelings; there are obviously a lot of concerns about the potential impact of a spill in relation to wild rice," she said.

"On some of the issues, we have shared values, common goals," she added. "No one wants to threaten the wild rice in Minnesota."

Enbridge has hired a tribal relations consultant. But several bands say neither Enbridge nor the state have done enough to consult with tribes.


41 indicted in drug trafficking ring on 2 Indian reservations
Monday, June 08 2015
 
Written by Laura Yuen and Jon Collins, MPR News ,
Average user rating    (0 vote)

41_indicted_in_drug_trafficking_ring_on_2_indian_reservations-web.jpg A federal grand jury has indicted 41 people in connection with a drug trafficking ring focused on two Indian reservations in Minnesota.

Authorities say the ring distributed drugs including heroin, methamphetamine, oxycodone and others in and around the Red Lake and White Earth Indian reservations starting in April 2014. Drugs were obtained in Detroit, Chicago and Minneapolis.

Heroin and prescription drugs have blazed a horrific path on the reservation, said Randy Goodwin, White Earth director of public safety. He said even newborn babies have been exposed to heroin because of their mothers' addictions.
"Many lives, families, and communities have been damaged or destroyed from this poison," Goodwin said. "Lives have been lost from overdose. Families have been destroyed. Our elders have been victims of threats, abuse, and theft."

Prosecutors describe Omar Sharif Beasley, 37, as the ringleader of the operation, alleging that he "recruited sources, supervisors, managers, distributors, facilitators, couriers, drivers." A former federal fugitive, Beasley has a history of drug convictions. For the past month, he has been held at the Anoka County jail on an unrelated charge of violating his probation.

Others charged include residents of North Dakota, Chicago, Milwaukee and the White Earth and Red Lake reservations.

Each suspect has been charged with conspiracy to distribute the drugs. Other charges for some of the suspects include drug possession with intent to distribute, illegal possession of a firearm and distribution of heroin, methamphetamine and prescription painkillers.

The indictment was filed last week but unsealed on May 27.

 


Analysis finds minorities arrested at a higher rate than whites in Mpls.
Monday, June 08 2015
 
Written by Brandt Williams, MPR News,
Average user rating    (0 vote)

analysis_finds_minorities_arrested_at_higher_rate_than_whites_in_mpls-web.jpgAn analysis released May 28 by the American Civil Liberties Union gives the most detailed picture yet of racial disparities in the treatment of low-level offenders by Minneapolis police.

Those arrested for non-felony offenses in Minneapolis are far more likely to be people of color than to be white.

The ACLU analyzed arrest data collected over nearly three years. Most of the arrests for low-level offenses occurred during traffic stops. Following FBI practice, the ACLU counts as an arrest encounters where people are merely stopped, ticketed and released.

Minneapolis police officers made nearly 100,000 non-felony arrests between Jan. 1, 2012, and Sept. 30, 2014. African-Americans and Native Americans were arrested at rates nearly nine times higher than the rate for whites.

African-Americans make up less than 19 percent of the city's population, and Native Americans just 2 percent. The arrest numbers don't include separate categories for Asians and Hispanics.

The disparity didn't come as a surprise to Henry Jackson, 55, as he stood across the street from Target Field with a handful of tickets.

Buying and selling tickets is legal, but Jackson, who's African-American, has been arrested for trespassing in the neighborhood three times since 2012.

The latest arrest happened outside nearby Target Center in January, as he was selling tickets for a Timberwolves game. He had stepped inside Target Center to warm his hands, he said, when two police officers cited and released him.

Jackson said white ticket sellers could do the same thing "all day long" without being stopped, "but it seems like they got us singled out."

Jackson was convicted, ordered to pay a $50 fine and given a stayed sentence of 90 days in the workhouse on the condition that he stay out of Target Center for a year. Now he can't enter the venue, even as a paying customer.


Sights & Sounds: Two Rivers Gallery Re-Opening
Tuesday, May 19 2015
 
Written by Alfred Walking Bull,
Average user rating    (0 vote)

MINNEAPOLIS – The Two Rivers Gallery in the Minneapolis American Indian Center re-opened on May 15 to the welcome of many in the community.

Highlights of the evening included poetry by R. Vincent Muniz, Jr., Ardie Medina with music by drum group Red Bone as well as a silent auction off some of the gallery's previous shows.

 


France delegation promotes Native products
Monday, May 04 2015
 
Written by Jon Lurie,
Average user rating    (0 vote)

france delegation promotes native products-web.jpgThe idea of becoming a Native American trade ambassador came to Diane Gorney during one of her recent excursions to France. “Walking down the streets in Paris people kept coming up and offering to buy the jewelry right off of me,” says the Minneapolis resident and White Earth descendant.

Gorney refused to sell the stunning beaded earrings, necklaces and bracelets she had purchased from Ojibwe artists back home. From those interactions, however, she came to understand the appetite French people have for all things Native American. In their hunger Gorney saw an opportunity to help her Ojibwe people. She investigated the availability of American Indian items such as traditional art and jewelry, and hand-harvested Minnesota wild rice.

The “Native American art” Gorney found in Parisian shops was of poor quality and manufactured in China. Gorney’s search for wild rice led her across the French capital. French cookbooks and menus frequently reference an ingredient called “riz sauvage (translation: wild rice),” so Gorney was mystified when she couldn’t find it in stores. Finally, at an obscure kosher market, Gorney ran across riz sauvage, but found the product nothing like the natural cereal grain which flourishes upon Minnesota’s northern waters.

The graphic on the packaging of France’s leading brand of riz sauvage, Tilda Giant Wild Rice, lends the impression the black rice is harvested by Native Americans. Its box cover contains an image of two American Indians poling a birch bark canoe through a wild rice bed. But a closer look reveals the truth: the product marketed in France as Native American wild rice is actually Indonesian, paddy-cultivated, black basmati rice, packaged and distributed by a Britain-based food brand selling in over 50 countries.

Gorney, a former art teacher, soon returned to Paris with a suitcase full of White Earth wild rice. She handed out one-pound bags to chefs and others whom she hoped would spread the word about the nutritious, delicious and sacred grain. “I wanted them to share, but people loved it so much they kept it for themselves. So my efforts were dead on arrival.”


Education and tribal administrator named to multi-state development post
Monday, May 04 2015
 
Written by Lee Egerstrom,
Average user rating    (0 vote)

c. kay-web.jpgAn experienced tribal and education administrator from the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe has been named the new executive director of the three-state Common Enterprise Development Corporation based at Mandan, N.D.

Cheryl Ann Kary (Hunkuotawin) succeeds long-time North Dakota public and private economic development leader Bill Patrie, nationally known for helping start several value-added agricultural businesses and services firms in North Dakota that involved several Indian organizations.

Patrie will remain working at the nonprofit consultancy during a transition period.

“I wouldn’t say I want to be a bridge between Indians and non-Indians,” she said in an interview. “I look at my new role as a resource link for people wanting to do things.”

Kary previously worked with adult education, student recruitment, public relations, and as vice president for community development at Sitting Bull College at Fort Yates. She was executive director of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe for two years. She also served as curriculum development director and trainer at the Native American Training Institute, and research director of United Tribes Technical College, both in Bismarck

She echoes views of Patrie, the executive director since it’s founding in 2009. Both say persistent poverty and health problems on reservations and in other communities aren’t a “people failure,” but rather a “systems failure.”

Farm poverty has at least been partly overcome by “system change,” Patrie said, whereby farm families now keep more of the value of their production at home and working in their state and local economies. Over the years, he helped create more than 30 such cooperatives including the Fort Berthold Agricultural Cooperative at New Town and the Twin Buttes Land Owners Energy Cooperative at Twin Buttes.

Common Enterprise, or CEDC, is a nonprofit consultancy providing technical assistance to start-up enterprises mutually or cooperatively owned on and off reservations in North Dakota, South Dakota and Minnesota. Tribally-owned enterprises are by definition membership-owned and thus sibling organizations with agricultural and food co-ops, mutual insurance and finance companies, credit unions and other forms of community enterprises owned and operated for the common good by members.

At CEDC, Patrie worked with local groups involving North Dakota reservations, 11 North Dakota counties, and others on developing a cooperative health care system; various community development projects; with North Dakota, South Dakota, Minnesota and Manitoba agricultural groups in developing value-added processing enterprises; and on rural and reservation housing projects.

Prior to starting CEDC, Patrie served 16 years as rural development director for the North Dakota Association of Rural Electric Cooperatives. He later was director of cooperative business strategies for the multi-state Northcountry Cooperative Development Fund and Foundation. CEDC is a spin-off development consultancy still linked with Northcountry.


<< Start < Prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Next > End >>

Results 53 - 78 of 544

Sponsors

bald_eagle_erectors_web_size.jpg metrostate_logo_color_web.jpg

Login to The Circle

Not a member yet?
Create your free account.





Lost Password?
No account yet? Register
Register with The Circle News and submit your own stories. You report the latest!

Ads

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Syndicate