subscribe_today.png

 

Citizen Journalism

Citizen JournalismCreate your free account and submit your own stories to The Circle website.Register for free and start publishing!

Article Guidelines

Watch the video to learn how!

Red Lake Tribal Council to research feasibility of marijuana
Friday, February 06 2015
 
Written by Michael Meuers, Red Lake News,
Average user rating    (0 vote)

red_lake_tribal_council_to_reseach_feasibility_of_marijuana.jpgRED LAKE, Minn. – Although the subject was not on the printed agenda for the Red Lake Tribal Council at the regularly scheduled monthly meeting on Jan. 13, recent acts by the federal government concerning Indian tribes, hemp and marijuana prompted several tribes to explore the feasibility of growing medical marijuana and industrial hemp.

Red Lake Chairman Darrell G. Seki, Sr., added the agenda item shortly after the call to order. He said he felt the federal ruling should at least be discussed. Seki cited several tribes that are looking deeper into the issue and mentioned fewer yet that were actually taking action.

Immediately, Red Lake citizen and Gardening Tech at Red Lake Traditional Foods David Manuel asked to address those assembled and spoke of the economic advantages to getting involved with at least industrial hemp and possibly medical marijuana. “Give me one of those three green houses near the elementary school for a year and I'll give you five million dollars," Manuel said. He offered no plan nor statistics for that claim.

Nearly everyone on the 11-member tribal council weighed in, including several chiefs and Red Lake members seated in the audience. Discussion ran the gamut from favorable to cautionary for both industrial hemp and medicinal marijuana.

Council member Roman Stately said toward the end of the discussion, that he "knew very little about either hemp or marijuana. We need a feasibility study. Lets learn about it.” Several council members and citizens agreed that they just were unfamiliar with the issue and that the tribe should explore the matter from a legal, economic and other issues surrounding the federal memo.

It was then moved and seconded, then passed unanimously to direct Red Lake Economic Development and Legal Departments to conduct a feasibility study and fact-finding mission on the issue and report back to council at an unspecified time.

Seki emphasized that whatever the outcome, no resolutions or tribal laws will be enacted without consultation with the membership both in informational meetings and eventually in a referendum … a vote of the entire nation. “Whatever we do, it will be done very carefully,” he said.

Seki, who holds informational and brainstorming sessions in each of the four Red Lake communities from time to time, said that for the next series of community meetings will be conducted over a two week period in February, that he will add the issue to the agenda and encouraged all Red Lake members to participate in that and all issues of concern to the tribe.


Red Lake Chairman and Treasurer travel to DC
Friday, February 06 2015
 
Written by Michael Meuers, Red Lake News,
Average user rating    (0 vote)

red lake washington dc-web.jpgWASHINGTON, D.C. – Red Lake Tribal Chairman Darrell G. Seki, Sr., and Treasurer Annette Johson, along with others met with members of the Minnesota Congressional delegation on Jan. 28 in Washington, D.C. to discuss a number of issues of concern to the Red Lake Band.

According to a tribal spokesperson, Seki and Johnson met with Minnesota's Sens. Amy Klobuchar and Al Franken. Reps. Collin Peterson, D-Moorhead, and Rick Nolan, D-Duluth.

Red Lake's lack of criminal jurisdiction over non-band members was the primary focus of the visits with the Congressional delegates. Tribal officials said they would like to have jurisdiction to prosecute non-members who bring drugs onto the Red Lake Reservation.

“All Congressmen were shocked to hear of our troubles with drug dealers and were very responsive to the Band's issues that were raised,” tribal spokespersons said. "Sen. Amy Klobuchar even suggested that a tribal summit – to include all of Minnesota's eleven tribes – would be in order, to discuss this and other topics of mutual concern to Indian Nations."

Seki and Johnson also met with the Bureau of Indian Affairs Assistant Secretary Kevin Washburn (Chickasaw) about the BIA's push to move funding from "one time funding" to a grant-based approach, a move that the Red Lake Band strongly opposes.

Other issues addressed by the Red Lake delegation included Red Lake's concern regarding insufficient funding for tribal roads, specifically the calculation formulas used by the federal government which allow tribes with smaller land bases to receive equal or even more funding. The Enbridge Pipeline was also discussed.

 

PHOTO: Red Lake Chairman Darrell G. Seki, Sr. and Treasurer Annette Johnson visit with U.S. Senator Amy Klobuchar, D-Minn. (Photo by Michael Meuers)


Celebrating local and Indigenous foods: Dinner on the Farm and the Sioux Chef
Friday, February 06 2015
 
Written by Ann Treacy, TC Daily Planet,
Average user rating    (0 vote)

dinner_2-web.jpgIt’s a good time to be a foodie. There are lots of food happenings around town, you just need to know where to look. Dinner on the Farm is a good place to start.

During the summer, Dinner on the Farm hosts chef-planned and prepared dinners on farms. They are fun family-friendly events that also often include good, local beer or wine. There’s special pricing for kids so please don’t tell the organizers, but I have seen my kid eat her weight in beef then wash is down with a gallon of strawberries and cream as she chases cows in the field at these events. The dinners are summer highlights. It’s a fun way to learn about a local farm (local may mean up to two hours from the Twin Cities), an emerging chef and often local breweries or other specialty food producers are included. The only way to find out about them is sign up. (Pssst – signing up is free!)

During the winter, Dinner on the Farm hosts Underground Dinner Parties – in art galleries, breweries, Tiki rooms, haunted houses and other fun places. These are less family friendly as they often have a higher level of alcohol content; they also involve a lot less driving. It’s a fun way to meet other foodies. (Be warned it’s not a place to pick up foodies since mingling is minimal and most folks come in groups but with a little effort and sometimes wine you get to meet the most interesting people!)

This last weekend the underground dinner turned to brunch at the Dogwood Coffee Roastery. I heard the coffee was amazing. I’m not a coffee drinker but I was introduced to Spruce Soda Ginger Beer drinker. I have been looking for something to replace Diet Coke; this is on the shortlist. It’s sweet but not syrupy or sugary. And it’s all natural.

The brunch included dry salamis from Red Table. I will forego bacon with brunch any and every there’s dry meats from Red Table on the buffet. Rise provided the bagels; they feature only locally grown and organic ingredients. Soft on the inside, a bite on the outside. Holds spreads and jams well!


Passing On: Wilmer Mesteth
Friday, February 06 2015
 
Written by The Circle Staff,
Average user rating    (0 vote)

Wilmer Mesteth wilmer mesteth-web.jpg

1957-Jan. 16, 2015

Oglala Lakota spiritual leader Wilmer Mesteth died unexpectedly at midnight on Jan. 16.

He will be remembered as a man who was as generous with his time and spiritual teachings. Mesteth served his people in every possible way. Those who are mourning his passing are remembering his guidance, direction and leadership.

According to his daughter Rachel, Mesteth underwent surgery for a double hernia on Jan. 8 and was recovering at the Prairie Winds Hotel in Pine Ridge, S.D.. In the afternoon, he was visiting with his adopted brothers when he called his wife with concerns that he was having a heart attack.

Mesteth lived in the Cheyenne Creek community and was married to Lisa Mesteth. He taught at Oglala Lakota College for over 20 years, where he was a cultural instructor. He taught traditional songs, dance, traditional herbs and foods, language and history. OLC student Lilly Jones said about Mesteth, “He treated everyone the same. Whether it was a Hollywood film crew or a student, he was always so respectful and humble.”

Mesteth also participated in the Big Foot Rides and the Crazy Horse Rides, and supported the Northern Cheyenne Fort Robinson Run.

Survivors include his wife Lisa Standing Elk-Mesteth and children Juan Mesteth, Lonnie Mesteth, Ronnie Mesteth, Hoksila Mesteth, Dakota Mesteth and Rachel Mesteth, all of Pine Ridge, S.D.; brothers Gilbert Mesteth and Phil Iron Cloud of Pine Ridge and Phillip Mesteth of Ethete, Wyo.; sisters Mary Ann Mesteth-Witt, Lynette Mesteth-Murray of Parmelee, S.D., Ruth Mesteth-Gray Horse and Letitia American Horse of Ethete, Wyo., Dennis Mesteth-Spoon Hunter of Fayetteville, N.C. Wilmer had 19 grandchildren. Numerous hunka children, brothers and sisters.

Wilmer was preceded in death by his parents Gabriel Mesteth, Sr., Rosalyn Red Shirt-Mesteth and his siblings Daniel Mesteth, Gabriel Mesteth, Jr., Orlin Mesteth and Theresa Mesteth.

Two night wake services were held on Jan. 21 at the Lakota Dome, Prairie Wind Casino, Pine Ridge, S.D., and Jan. 22 at the Mesteth family residence, Cheyenne Creek, S.D.. The funeral was held at Jan. 23 at the Mesteth family residence. Arrangements were handled by the Sioux Funeral Home of Pine Ridge.



From the Editor's Desk: Look before leaping into cannabis
Thursday, February 05 2015
 
Written by Alfred Walking Bull, The Circle Managing Editor,
Average user rating    (0 vote)

whats_new_-_walfred_walking_bull.jpgAnyone who sits through any tribal council meeting knows well the time and measure of deliberation of any issue in Indian Country. In South Dakota tribal councils, the tradition of consensus – even when put against the formalism of Roberts Rules of Order – tends to give way to all persons with an opinion on any given matter being discussed.

Too often, as Indian people, we prefer the romantic notion of swift, decisive action. It comes from our times of war with the encroaching enemy, be they other tribes or a growing country of European immigrants. We harken back to the idea that in order to be Indian, we must act aggressively and without doubt. True enough, given the mode of war but when it comes to nation-building, planning and economic development, seemingly endless meetings and discussions are better advised.

As Red Lake Nation – along with other tribes across the country – follow the lead of the U.S. Department of Justice's implied permission at the close of 2014 to pursue the cultivation and sale of hemp and marijuana, there are many questions that need to be asked and real answers given before motions to legalize should even be made.

Marijuana is not the silver bullet. The growth and sale of cannabis on Indian reservations are not the great sustainer we would like them to be. We know this because we have seen this model before with Indian gaming.

While many in Minnesota and across the country who did not grow up on the reservation like to point to financial windfalls and continued profitability of Indian gaming, those cases are the exception and not the rule. For many tribes, most of which are out of the way and in the most inaccessible regions of this country for basic emergency services – a gift from the largess of the federal government, to be sure – the profitability of gaming is low. The Native American Rights Fund reports that of the 560 tribal nations, only 224 operate gaming establishments. The National Indian Gaming Commission in its Gaming Revenue Reports from 2009 to 2013, show that the average of only 26 operations showed revenue in the $11 million. Split among the citizens of each tribal nations how they see fit to disperse it, either through per capita payments or investment in their infrastructures, it is still a long way to go for most tribes.


Native Lives Matter: A Solution to Police Violence in Indian Country
Tuesday, January 13 2015
 
Written by Jon Lurie,
Average user rating    (0 vote)
native lives matter-web.jpg“Black Lives Matter!” The chant has echoed through America’s streets since Aug. 9, the day unarmed teenager Michael Brown was shot and killed by a white police officer in Ferguson, Mo. The Brown case focused attention on longstanding problems in black communities: racial profiling and police violence against young black men.

The perceived lack of justice in these and many other cases sparked major demonstrations, including a Dec. 20 rally at the Mall of America that drew more than 3,000 protesters.

But as millions rallied around the cause of human rights for African-Americans, many Indigenous people wonder if America thinks their lives matter. For every Michael Brown, for every Eric Garner, they say, there is a victim of police violence in Indian Country whose name you probably don’t know.

“It's imperative to understand that this issue is not just about black people and white people. Despite the available statistical evidence, most people don't know that Native Americans are most likely to be killed by police, compared with other racial groups. Native Americans make up about 0.8% of the population, yet account for 1.9% of police killings,” Simon Moya-Smith, an Oglala Lakota journalist, wrote in a CNN editorial last month.

“There is no outcry against what’s happening in Native American communities,” Lemoine LaPointe, a Lakota educator and community organizer from Rosebud, S.D. who lives in the Twin Cities said. “These very same atrocities that have been happening in the Black community have been happening to Native American people and without protest. It has to stop.”

While police and military violence against Native American people has been occurring for hundreds of years, LaPointe said a recent rash of incidents could have been avoided if police officers had been trained to use violence as a last resort. He refers to the following as cases where lives might have been saved had responding officers deployed nonlethal tactics.

<< Start < Prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Next > End >>

Results 53 - 78 of 523

Sponsors

adobe designs-web 1.jpgbald_eagle_erectors_web_size.jpglogo spot_color - copy.jpgpcl_leaders_web_size.jpg api_supply_lifts_web_size.jpg

Login to The Circle

Not a member yet?
Create your free account.





Lost Password?
No account yet? Register
Register with The Circle News and submit your own stories. You report the latest!

Syndicate