Citizen Journalism

Citizen JournalismCreate your free account and submit your own stories to The Circle website.Register for free and start publishing!

Article Guidelines

Watch the video to learn how!

Mascot Protest Spurs Continued Momentum
Friday, January 09 2015
Written by Art Coulson,
Average user rating    (0 vote)

mascot protest spurs continued momentum-tcf crowd-web.jpgIn the weeks since thousands of native people and their allies converged on TCF Stadium to protest the Washington NFL team’s offensive name, those involved in the #NotYourMascot march and rally have continued the conversation with a focus on maintaining momentum toward a name change.

“Five hundred and twenty-two years of stereotypes is difficult to eradicate,” Robert DesJarlait, a Red Lake elder, said. He carried the eagle staff to lead the People’s March from the American Indian OIC to the stadium on the University of Minnesota campus on Nov. 2 as an organizer for Save Our Manoomin. “We need to use education as a means of dislodging decades of stereotypes. [Washington owner Daniel] Snyder's team is just the starting point. But it's the beginning of the process to eradicate such imagery and restore pride and human dignity to Native people.”

Organizers of the march said while the Washington team name is the most racially offensive, their battle to end the use of native mascots in sport does not end there.

“We need to go after not just the NFL, but the NHL and major-league baseball also,” Jason Elias, a march organizer and member of AIM-Twin Cities said. “I think it's too bad we missed an opportunity this last summer to protest the All-Star game when it was here in Minneapolis. One thing I would like to say is that I would like to give credit and thank Vernon Bellecourt who is the founding father in the fight against Native mascots. He truly deserves the credit.”

Elias plans to continue the battle by focusing on schools and using anti-bullying policies to target those who wear native mascot gear to school.

#NotYourMascot is a coalition of grassroots organizations including Idle No More-Twin Cities, AIM-Twin Cities, AIM Patrol of Minneapolis, United Urban Warrior Society, Idle No More-Wisconsin, Protect Our Manoomin, Twin Cities Save the Kids, Minnesota Two Spirit Society and several other organizations.

The march and rally for the Minnesota-Washington football game, which drew a crowd of between 3,500 and 5,000 people from across North America who marched on the stadium from several directions, was the largest so far to protest the use of native mascots by sports teams. Organizers vowed to protest at each of the remaining Washington football games this season. On Nov. 23, hundreds of protesters took to the streets in San Francisco before the San Francisco-Washington game.

Photography helps Native youth enrich their lives
Friday, January 09 2015
Written by Deanna Standing Cloud,
Average user rating    (0 vote)

photography helps native youth enrich their lives.jpgBefore the cold winter season claimed its place in the Twin Cities area this year, six Native American high school students from across the area were able to enjoy a memorable experience.

On an October afternoon, participants in the Mazinaakizige: American Indian Teen Photography Project and their mentors connected with the elements on a canoe journey down the Mississippi River.

The students were armed with 35 mm film cameras and anticipation for whatever this journey may have brought. Second year participant, Breanna Green shared about her experience, “Being on the water is healing and so calming.”

Participants and mentors alike carefully moved along one of the largest rivers in the world across the glistening sparkle of the reflection of the sunlight with wonderment and curiosity. This incredible opportunity was the perfect environment for connection to the natural world, the basis for creative thought which is fertile ground for photographic practice.

On Nov. 22, six Native American high school students celebrated the completion of their participation in the Mazinaakizige: American Indian Teen Photography Project at the Minneapolis Photography Center. Rainey Rock (White Earth Ojibwe), Sage Mills (Lakota), Breanna Green (Red Lake Ojibwe), Andrew Fairbanks (White Earth Ojibwe), Lupe Thornhill (Red Lake Ojibwe) and Elizabeth Santana (Hunkpapa Lakota) invited their families to their very own gallery opening featuring their work. Hoka Hey drum group, a collective of young Native men, recognized the students and families with an honor song. Dozens of supporters from the Native arts community came to support the young artists as well to share food, stories and prayer for this project.

The word “Mazinaakizige” is an Ojibwe word meaning, “the act of creating pictures.” Mazinaakizige: American Indian Teen Photography Project launched a pilot program three years ago in collaboration with the Minneapolis Photo Center and the Minnesota Historical Society with sponsorship from the Arts and Cultural Heritage Fund.

DNR tightens winter walleye rules for Upper Red Lake
Friday, January 09 2015
Written by John Enger, Minnesota Public Radio News,
Average user rating    (0 vote)

Minnesota anglers fishing Upper Red Lake this winter will face tougher regulations on their walleye catch.

Effective Dec. 1, anglers can only hold or keep keep three walleye, the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources said Monday.

All walleye 17 to 26 inches long must be immediately released and only one walleye in possession may be longer than 26 inches, the DNR said.

The rule changes come following record walleye harvests the past winter and summer and are not a sign of biological problems in the northwest Minnesota lake, the agency added.

"The current walleye fishery is in excellent shape, but the great fishing has attracted considerably more angling pressure, which resulted in walleye harvest exceeding the safe harvest range for the first time since walleye angling reopened in 2006," Gary Barnard, the DNR's Bemidji area fisheries supervisor, said in a statement.

Much of Upper Red Lake is owned by the Red Lake Band of Ojibwe. It's been managed jointly by the band and the DNR since the walleye population there hit an all time low 15 years ago.

Red Lake band Fisheries Director Pat Brown said the lake has made a great comeback. "The lake is probably in better shape than it ever has been," he said. "The lake just continues to become healthier."

The new walleye limits don't apply to tribe members fishing reservation waters.

While the off-reservation portion of Upper Red Lake saw a large walleye harvest this year, Brown said tribe members took many fewer fish then they could have.

"We're about 100,000 pounds under what we could safely take out of the reservation waters," he said. "So we may actually relax our regulations a little bit."

DNR officials remain concerned about the walleye population in Mille Lacs Lake in central Minnesota. Numbers there remain the lowest seen in decades and DNR officials say it will take time for the population to recover, though a fall survey showed some hopeful signs.

The DNR's been encouraging anglers to catch northern pike instead of walleye at Mille Lacs. As part of that effort, officials on Monday announced they would loosen rules for catching and spearing pike this winter on Mille Lacs.

Anglers and spearers can keep 10 northern pike, of which only one may be longer than 30 inches. Also, northern pike season will be extended from mid-February to the last Sunday in March.

The lake's walleye fishing regulations will not change this winter, the DNR emphasized.

Minnesota Public Radio News can be heard on MPR's statewide radio network or online at

Mille Lacs walleye lawsuit against DNR heads to appeals court
Tuesday, January 13 2015
Written by John Enger, Minnesota Public Radio News,
Average user rating    (0 vote)

Disgruntled resort owners and citizens' groups argued before a three-judge panel of the Minnesota Court of Appeals on Nov. 20 that the state Department of Natural Resources has mismanaged Mille Lacs Lake.

In April, resort owner Bill Eno, several other local residents and the non-profit advocacy groups Proper Economic Resource Management and Save Mille Lacs Sport Fishing filed suit against the DNR.

Citing a 1998 state constitutional amendment to preserve fishing heritage, they argued that department did not consider it when formulating its latest walleye regulations, which include an extended ban on night fishing.

"The DNR ... could not have designed better plans to destroy the Mille Lacs Lake walleye fishing heritage than the plans that the DNR implemented since 1998," attorney Erick Kaardal wrote in the lawsuit.

The lawsuit seeks to force DNR lake managers to rethink fishery management techniques and listen more closely to local opinion. The three-judge panel is expected to rule on the lawsuit within 90 days.

Eno, who has owned Twin Pines Resort on the western shore of Mille Lacs for two decades, said he has watched DNR regulations tighten, even as walleye numbers decrease. He said the department has crippled the lake's walleye population, and his business.

When the DNR announced regulations temporarily banning night fishing early this spring, Eno had to call dozens of regular customers to cancel their night reservations. The rules hit his business hard, because he makes a lot of his money running fishing launches from 8 p.m. to midnight.

The DNR later re-opened night fishing, but for Eno, the ban was the last straw.

Thank You!
Friday, November 14 2014
Written by Alfred Walking Bull,
Average user rating    (0 vote)

Warroad Warriors Rededicated
Saturday, November 01 2014
Written by Jon Lurie,
Average user rating    (0 vote)

web-warroad 1.jpgIn its 30 year quest to influence teams to change their names, mascots and logos from those that are offense to Native Americans, the National Coalition Against Racism in Sports and Media is making strides. Thousands of high schools and colleges across the country have felt the pressure and given up names which encourage stereotyping of indigenous people.

NCARSM, which is based in Minneapolis, still has work to do before the thousands of offensive team names still in use are relegated to the annals of history. The organization’s current strategy is to go after the National Football League's Washington team, a nationally prominent team whose name is a racial slur and whose tradition of mocking Native American people is seen as particularly vile.

“We believe that when the Washington team changes, everyone else will follow,” NCARSM board member Clyde Bellecourt said. He also said the Washington team has a tradition of upholding institutional racism that goes far beyond the current disagreement over its name. The team was last in the National Football League to allow – in October of 1961 – non-white players on its roster, a move that prompted their former supporters, the American Nazi Party, to protest outside RFK Stadium.

But as NCARSM focused its efforts on organizing a major rally against the Washington team (who play the Minnesota Vikings at TCF Bank Stadium on the campus of the University of Minnesota Nov. 2) one of its board members, the organization alleges, Alan Yelsey – without the knowledge or blessing of others within the organization – was mailing threatening letters to schools with disparaging team names. Yelsey and NCARSM have since parted ways.

<< Start < Prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Next > End >>

Results 79 - 104 of 539


adobe designs-web 1.jpgbald_eagle_erectors_web_size.jpgpcl_leaders_web_size.jpg metrostate_logo_color_web.jpg

Login to The Circle

Not a member yet?
Create your free account.

Lost Password?
No account yet? Register
Register with The Circle News and submit your own stories. You report the latest!